Journal of the House of Commons
December 1584

Sponsor

History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Author

Sir Simonds d'Ewes

Year published

1682

Pages

334-346

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'Journal of the House of Commons: December 1584', The Journals of all the Parliaments during the reign of Queen Elizabeth (1682), pp. 334-346. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43705 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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December 1584

On Tuesday the first day of December five Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the first being the Bill concerning Parsonages impropriate to be disposed to charitable and pious uses, was after the second reading and sundry Arguments about it, committed to Mr Treasurer, Sir John Higham, Mr Sollicitor, Mr Recorder, Mr Heale, Mr Skinner, and others who were appointed to meet this Afternoon at one of the Clock in the Exchequer-Chamber; and the Bill was delivered to Mr Treasurer one of the said Committees.

Upon a motion for a Committee of some few of this House, being learned in the Laws, to peruse all such Statutes as are to have their continuance but unto the end of this present Session of Parliament, divers of the House were appointed to collect the Titles of all such Statutes; to the end that upon view and consideration to be severally had of them by the House, it may further be considered which of them are still to be continued, and which not. The names of which persons so appointed were as followeth, viz. Mr Recorder of London, Mr Sollicitor General, Mr Morrice, Mr Sandes, Mr Henry Beamond, Mr Waterhouse, Mr Fanshaw, Mr Richard Lewkenor, Mr Cromwell, Mr Thimbleby, and Mr Hamman.

On Wednesday the second day of December three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the second being the Bill for reformation of disorders in common Informers, was upon the second reading committed to Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr Alford, Mr Henry Beamond, and others who were appointed to meet on Friday next at one of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Exchequer Chamber. And the third and last Bill concerning Actions upon the Case to be tried in their proper Counties, was upon the second reading committed unto Mr Dale one of the Masters of Requests, Mr Sollicitor, Mr Attorney of the Court of Wards, and others, who were appointed to meet upon Saturday next being the fifth day of this instant December, at two of the Clock in the Afternoon, in the Exchequer Chamber.

This Bill had been much argued upon, before it was committed; and it seems some Arguments being not liked, divers of the House had endeavoured by coughing and spitting to shorten them. Whereupon Sir Francis Hastings made, a Motion (that as upon like occasion offered, others had moved, that words of note, as Town-Clerk and such like, should not offensively be applied to the persons of such as had formerly spoken) that in like manner it were now to be wished that in respect of the gravity and honour of this House, when any Member thereof shall speak unto a Bill, the residue would forbear to interrupt or trouble him by unnecessary coughing, spitting or the like.

On Thursday the third day of December, Six Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the fourth being the Bill concerning Hue and Cry was read the second time, and committed unto Sir Richard Greensield, Sir Henry Cock, Mr Richard Lewkenor and others, who were appointed to meet to Morrow at one of the Clock in the Afternoon in the open Exchequer Court.

The fifth Bill also was brought into the House by Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, being a new Bill for the better and more reverend observation of the Sabbath day, which had been framed by the Committees appointed to consider of the old Bill on Friday the 27th day of November foregoing, and had this day its first reading.

Nota, That though the old Bill was altered, and this new Bill concerning the Sabbath, framed by the Committees appointed on the said 27th day of November as asoresaid, were now brought into the House and read; yet it did not pass the two Houses without much dispute and great difficulty, being committed and amendments upon amendments added unto it, ut vide on Wednesday the 17th day of March following.

The last Bill of the said six being for a Bank of general Charity to be appointed for the relies of common necessary was put to the Question upon the first reading and rejected. Quod nota, because it is not usual a Bill to be put to the Question upon the first reading.

Upon the report of Sir James Crost Comptroller of her Majesties Houshold, and Mr William Howard, of the great disorder of Serving-men and Boys in hurting and misusing of other Persons, and of whom Mr Comptroller and Mr Howard did see and take two of the said disordered persons; It was Ordered, that the Serjeant of the House should wait upon Mr Comptroller to know the same two Persons, and to bring them to this House to Morrow, sitting the Court.

The Bill lastly for the true Answering of Tithes was read the second time, and thereupon committed unto Sir Richard Greenfield, Sir John Peter, Sir William Harbert, Mr Dale one of the Masters of the Requests, and the Bill was delivered to the said Mr Dale, who with the rest was appointed to meet on Monday the 8th day of this instant December following at two of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Middle-Temple Hall.

On Friday the 4th day of December, Three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the third being the Bill against partial Juries and Trials, was upon the second reading committed unto Mr Recorder of London, Mr Tanfield, Mr Cromwell and others; and the Bill was delivered to Mr Attorney of the Court of Wards, one of the said Committees, who with the rest was appointed to meet upon Monday the 7th day of this instant December following at two of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Inner-Temple Hall.

The Bill for the maintenance of Navigation, and another Bill concerning Cloth at Boxted in Essex, having passed the House upon the third reading, were sent up to the Lords by Mr Treasurer of her Majesties Houshold, Mr Vice-Chamberlain and others.

The Bill for the better and more reverend observation of the Sabbath day was read the second time and Ordered to be ingrossed. De qua Vide plus on Wednesday the 17th day of March following.

Upon a Motion made this day unto the House by Mr Speaker, that Mr Marmaduke Wivell one of the Burgesses for the Borough of Richmond in the County of York, is lately faln very sick, and not able to give his attendance on this House till he shall have recovered better health, and therefore desireth in the mean time Licence of this House to go a little into the Country to take change of Air for a short time for the seeking of his better health and strength, it was granted, and agreed by this House that he may do so with the good favour and leave of this House accordingly.

Upon another Motion also made by Mr Speaker for Mr Edward Leigh Esquire, one of the Knights returned into this present Parliament for the County of Stafford, and since that time chosen to be Sheriff of the said County of Stafford; It was likewise Ordered by this House, that the said Edward Leigh may with the good leave of this House have liberty to absent himself in and about his necessary charge and service in the said Office of Sheriffwick.

Nota, That hence it may be probably gathered, that neither her Majesty nor the House of Commons did conceive these two places to be incompetible, but that they might well stand and be in one and the same Man at one and the same time; for her Majesty did first make him Sheriff of the County of Stafford, not only after he was chosen, but returned a Knight of the same County also, which it is very plain she could not be ignorant of; and therefore her self and the House of Commons did both allow of his being made Sheriff as a thing well agreeing with the priviledge of his former place, and the service of that House, and did not therefore give him a final discharge, but only liberty of recess about his necessary affairs into the Country, as in the foregoing case of sickness, which being expedited, he might return again to that service. For doubtless if the said House had conceived that he had been utterly disabled from his serving there by his new Office, it would have been Ordered, That a Warrant should have been sent to the Clerk of the Crown to have sent down a new Writ into the said County of Stafford for a new Election to have been made, as in the case of double Returns, death or the like is used. Besides, if her Majesty might have disabled as many Members from serving in that House as the should or could have made Sheriffs, it had lain in her power (and may lye in the power of any King or Queen of this Realm for the time being) to have disfurnished the House of Commons at any time of all or the greater part of the ablest Members thereof.

This ordinance inhibitis also as well the Election of Lawyers as of Sherrifs.

Against this Opinion the words of the very Writ, by Authority whereof the Knights, Citizens, Burgesses and Barons of the House of Commons are elected, hath been and may be still objected, viz. Nolumus autem quòd tu, nec aliquis alius Vicecomes dicti Regni nostri aliqualiter sit electus, &c. which words were not in the Writ during the Reign of King Henry the Third, E. 1. E. 2. and the beginning of the Reign of King Edward the Third, but crept in afterwards by virtue of an Ordinance of Parliament upon some special occasion to that end made, which is entred in Rotulo Parliament de Anno 46 E. 3. num. 13. And therefore the constant practice in many Parliaments since to the contrary may well be admitted and followed, as the greater and more swaying Authority, which also appeareth in the aforesaid Precedent, the said Mr Leigh being allowed to maintain and retain both the said places, and to serve in them without all manner of dispute or question. Vide plus concerning this business on Tuesday the 23. day of February following.

On Saturday the 5th day of December two Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the last being the Bill against the delay of Justice, was upon the second reading committed unto Mr Vicechamberlain, Mr Chanceller of the Exchequer, Mr Sandes, Mr Somcitor, and others, who were appointed to meet on Monday the 7th day of this instant December following in the Afternoon in the Exchequer-Chamber or Star-Chamber.

The Bill also for the better and more reverent observing of the Sabbath day was read the third time, and upon the question passed the House. Vide touching this Bill on Wednesday the 17th day of March following.

The Lords also sent back to the House of Commons the Bill touching Boxted Clothes with some amendments and additions, which had been carried up yesterday to their Lordships by Mr Treasurer and others from the said House.

The Bills, lastly, for reformation of Informers, and for Actions upon the Case to be brought in their proper Counties, were appointed to be dealt in in the Exchequer-Chamber at two of the Clock this Afternoon by the Committees of the same Bills, upon warning thereof given unto them by this House, at the motion of Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer.

On Monday the 7th day of December three Bills of no great moment had each of them their first reading; of which the second being the Bill concerning the Town of Richmond was rejected upon the Question. Quod nota.

The third Bill also being for the assurance of certain Messuages and Lands, late Edward Fishers, unto George Chewne Esquire and others in Fee simple, was upon the first reading committed unto Mr Recorder, Mr Morrice, Mr Sandes and Mr Clement Fisher, and it was Ordered, That the said Mr Edward Fisher shall have word thereof by the Serjeant of this House this present day, and a reasonable time given him to attend upon the said Committees, and to be heard (if he will) what he can say why the said Bill should not pass this House. Nota also, that this Bill was here committed upon the first reading. De qua vide plus on Monday the 22th day of February following.

Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer in the name of himself and the other Committees for the Bill for reformation of disorders in common Informers, shewed, that they had met together and had conference touching the same Bill, and have in some parts amended the same and added thereunto, and so offered it to the House. Whereupon the said Bill being with the amendments and additions twice read, was ordered to be ingrossed.

The Bill for the more reverent observation of the Sabbath day, and the Bill concerning Boxted Clothes with the amendments and additions of the Lords, allowed and thrice read and passed, were sent up unto them by the House of Commons by Mr. Comptroller and others. Vide plus concerning the Bill of the Sabbath on Wednesday the 17th day of March following.

The Committees in the Bills for Hue and Cry, for true answering of Tithes, and against Tryals by partial Juries, were appointed to meet in the Middle Temple-Hall to morrow at two of the Clock in the Afternoon, upon Consideration that the most part of the Committees are to meet this Afternoon in the great Committee.

Mr Comptroller and Mr Lieutenant of the Tower, were appointed by the House to examine the affray even now made in the White-Hall or Court of Requests, as Mr Comptroller and the residue were carrying up the two last mentioned Bills to the Lords.

The Bill touching Suffolk-Cloths was read the second time, and committed unto Mr Treasurer, Mr Comptroller, Mr Vice-Chamberlain, Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir Robert Germin, Sir William Drurie, Mr Rawleigh and others; and the Bill was delivered to Mr Treasurer, who with the rest was appointed to meet upon Thursday next being the 10th day of this instant December following at one of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Exchequer Chamber.

The Committees also in the Bill against the delay of Justice, were appointed to meet upon Wednesday next being the 9th day of this instant Month of December in the Afternoon, (but the hour is not specified) in the Exchequer Chamber.

The Bill lastly for bringing in of staple Fish and Ling, was upon the second reading committed unto Sir Francis Drake, Mr Fenner, Mr Grice, Sir Edward Dymock and others; and the Bill was delivered to the said Sir Edward Dymock, who with the rest was appointed to meet on Thursday the 10th day of this instant December following, at one of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Exchequer Chamber.

On Tuesday the 8th day of December, the Bill for preservation of Timber in the County of Sussex was read the second time, and committed unto Mr Comptroller, Sir Thomas Shirley, Sir Philip Sidney, Mr Alford, Mr Robert Sackvile and others, who were appointed to meet on Saturday the 12th day of this instant December following at two of the Clock in the Afternoon in the StarChamber Court.

Upon a Motion made by Mr Speaker for the opinion of this House touching the validity of some Knights returned for some Shires of this Realm, not being (as it is supposed) chosen at the next County after the date of the Writ of Summons of this Parliament, and after some Speech also therein offered by Mr Bevill, by which he seemed to suspect that the matter of the Motion tended to and concerned himself and Mr Darrington returned Knights for the Shire of Huntington, it was referred unto Mr Treasurer, Mr Vice-Chamberlain, Mr. Sollicitor and Mr. Recorder of London, who were appointed to meet on Saturday the 12th day of this instant December following in the Forenoon (but no hour specified) in the Exchequer Chamber. Vide plus concerning this matter on Saturday the 12th day, and on Monday the 21th day of this instant December ensuing.

Upon a Motion made unto this House by Mr. Lieutenant of the Tower, that the Armour of Papists being Recusants might not remain in their own Custody; It was Ordered that Mr. Sandes and Mr. Monit do draw a Bill to that end.

The Committees in the Bill against the delay of Justice were appointed to meet upon Friday the 11th day of this instant December following, at two of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Exchequer Chamber.

On Wednesday the 9th day of December, Three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the last touching Tanners, Curriers, Shoomakers, &c. was upon the second reading committed unto Mr. Sollicitor, Sir William Moor, Mr. Recorder of London, Mr. Dalton and others, who were appointed to meet upon Monday the 14th day of this instant December following, at one of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Guild-Hall.

The Bill for redress of disorders in common Informers, was after the third reading and many Arguments committed again to the former Committees (Mr. Treasurer and Mr. Vice-Chamberlain being added unto them) Mr. Sollicitor, Mr. William Moore, Mr. Recorder of London, Mr. Harne, Mr. Morice, Mr. Dalton, Mr. Francis Bacon, Mr. Beale and Mr. Owen, who were appointed to meet upon Saturday the 12th day of this instant December following at one of the Clock in the Afternoon, but no place mentioned where.

Nota, That this Bill was committed upon the third reading, having been formerly committed upon the second, which is not usual.

Another Bill also of no great moment concerning Sheriffs was upon the second reading committed; but to whom it was committed, or when and where the said Committees should meet, is not at all set down in the Original Journal-Book of the House of Commons, but seemeth to have been omitted through the negligence of Mr Fulk Onslow at this time Clerk of the same.

On Thursday the 10th day of December, Two Bill of no great moment had each of them their first reading; of which the first was the Bill for the preservation of Plymouth-Haven.

Mr Serjeant Gawdy and Mr Attorney General did bring a Message from the Lords, that their Lordships do pray Conference with some of this House to join with a Committee of their Lordships touching the Bill lately passed this House and sent up unto their Lordships, for the better and more reverend observing of the Sabbath day. Whereupon Mr Treasurer, Mr Comptroller, Mr. Vice-Chamberlain, the Lord Russell, Sir William Herbert, Sir William Moore, Mr. Edward Lewkenor, Mr. Francis Hastings and Mr. George Moore were appointed by this House to attend their Lordships therein to Morrow at two of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Parliament Chamber. Vide concerning this matter of the Sabbath on Wednesday the 17th day of March following.

The Bill against dying with Sumach, and some other Bills wholly omitted through the negligence of the Clerk, and therefore seem to have been of no great moment, were upon the second reading committed unto Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Recorder of London, Mr. Hutton, Mr. Henry Nevill and others; and the Bills were delivered to the said Mr. Henry Nevill, who with the rest were appointed to meet upon Monday next the 14th day of this instant December following in the Afternoon in the Middle-Temple Hall.

The Bill also against vicious life and idleness was upon the second reading committed unto Sir William Herbert, Sir Edward Dymock and others, and the Bill was delivered to the said Sir Edward Dymock, who with the rest were appointed to meet to Morrow at one of the Clock in the Afternoon in the Middle-Temple Hall.

Mr. Recorder one of the Committees appointed on Monday the 7th day of this instant December foregoing in the Bill for the assurance of certain Messuages, Lands and Tenements late Edward Fishers unto George Chewne Esquire and others in Fee-Simple, according to the true intent and meaning of certain Conveyances unto them by the said Edward Fisher made, reported to the House that upon Examination by himself and the other Committees therein had, and also by comparing and conferring the Contents of the preamble of the said Bill with the Conveyances of the premisses, and also with the Judgment upon the forgery in the Star-Chamber, and also of their Conferences had with the said Edward Fisher and Katherine his Wife, as well together as a part and asunder touching the premisses and circumstances of the same, they have amended the said Bill according to the said Conveyances, not only in the form thereof, but also in the principal matter and substance, and offered both the said Bill so amended, the said Evidences or Conveyances (being two several Deeds) indented and inrolled in the Court of chancery, and also the said Judgment in the Star-Chamber exemplified under the Great Seal of England. Whereupon the Bill was presently read, and the said amendments also twice read, and so the Bill thereupon Ordered to be ingrossed. Vide plus on Monday the 22th day of February following.

On Friday the 11th day of December, Six Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the Bill concerning the aforesaid business of Edward Fisher, and for the assurance of certain Lands lately sold by him unto George Chewne Esquire and others in Fee-Simple, did pass upon the third reading. Vide plus on Monday the 22th day of February following.

Mr. Vice-Chamberlain in the behalf of himself and of the residue of the Committees in the great Causes, shewed unto the House, that they have had sundry Meetings together, and endeavoured to draw two several Bills to such ends as they thought fittest, and having one of the said Bills ready drawn, but not the other, yet for want of longer time to meet, and which yet cannot now be before Monday next, offered unto the said House the Bill that was ready drawn. But what the Title of the Bill was, or what these great matters were, is wholly omitted through the Clerks negligence: yet it may be probably conjectured, that they were concerning the Subsidy and Religion, or the Bill for the preservation of her Majesties most Royal Person. De qua vide on Monday the 14th day of December following.

The Bill lastly touching Grants by Corporations was upon the second reading committed unto Mr Comptroller, Mr Recorder and others.

But the time and place appointed for their meeting is in the Original Journal-Book of the House of Commons through the Clerks negligence wholly omitted.

On Saturday the 12th day of December, Notice being given to the House of one Mr Hall a Member of the same, that had not attended all this Parliament, it was Ordered that the Serjeant should give him warning to attend upon Monday next. Vide plus in fine bujus diei.

Mr. Recorder of London and Mr. Sollicitor were appointed by the House to examine the Record of the return of Mr. Bevill and Mr. Darrington the two Knights chosen for the Shire of Huntington, and of the circumstances thereof.

Nota, That the Recorder of London is in this place and in all other Passages of this Journal, for the most part named and ranked before the Queens Sollicitor, although his place at this time be after him.

Mr. Bevill one of the Knights returned for the said County of Huntington, declared, that he was charged by a Member of this House, that he had lied in his former Speech to this House touching the Declaration of the manner of chusing himself and Mr. Darrington Knights for the Shire of Huntington; wherein as he taketh himself to be very much abused being a Member of this House, so appealing himself to the same, he prayed remedy and order to be given therein by this honourable House upon the hearing of the cause. Vide plus concerning this matter on Tuesday the 8th day of this instant December foregoing, as also on Monday the 21th day of the same Month following.

The Bill for the assurance of certain Messuages, Lands and Tenements, late Edward Fishers unto George Chewne Esquire and others in Feesimple, was sent up to the Lords by Mr. Treasurer and others. Vide de ista materia on Monday the 22th day of February following.

Mr. Serjeant Gawdy and Mr. Attorney General did bring from the Lords a Bill for remedy against fraudulent Conveyances, with recommendation thereof from their Lordships to this House, and request also for present Conference with the Committees of this House touching the Bill for the observation of the Sabbath day. Of which see more on Wednesday the 17th day of March following.

Sir William Knolles, Mr. Fanshaw and others were appointed Committees this Afternoon to meet in the Middle-Temple Hall about the Oath for Sheriffs, &c.

Three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the last being the Bill touching Collectors of Issues by Juries, was upon the second reading committed unto Mr. Cromwell, Mr. Nathanael Bacon, Mr. Henry Barkley and others, and the Bill was delivered to the said Mr. Barkley, who with the rest was appointed to meet in the Middle-Temple Hall to Morrow at two of the Clock in the Afternoon.

The Lords did this Morning send down to the House of Commons a Bill touching the assurance of certain Lands to Sir Thomas Lucy Knight and others.

The business of Mr. Arthur Hall, of which the House had been informed upon their first meeting this Morning, was before the rising of the House referred to Mr. Wolley, Mr. Cromwell, Mr. Diggs and Mr. Sandes, to peruse the order touching the same against Monday next, being the day appointed by the House for the said Mr. Hall to appear before them.

On Monday the 14th day of December further day was given unto the Committees for the Bill touching Tanners, &c. and to meet at the Yeeld Hall (alias Guild-Hall) to Morrow at two of the Clock in the Afternoon.

The Bill for Confirmation of Letters Patents granted unto Walter Rawleigh Esquire for the discovery of Foreign Countries was read Primâ vice.

Three Petitions touching the liberty of Godly Preachers, and to exercise and continue their Ministries, and also for the speedy supply of able and sufficient men into divers places now destitute and void of the ordinary means of Salvation, were offered unto the House; the first by Sir Thomas Lucy, the second by Sir Edward Dymock, and the third by Mr. Gates: which were all thereupon read, and further proceedings therein deferred until a more convenient time. Vide concerning this matter on Monday the 22th day of February following, and more largely on Thursday the 25th day of February ensuing.

Which notwithstanding Doctor Turner a little after rose up, and put the House in remembrance of a Bill and Book heretofore offered by him unto the said House, which had been digested and framed by certain Godly and Learned Ministers, and which said Bill and Book did tend to no other end, as he conceived, than the Glory of God, the Safety of her Majesty and the benefit of the Common-Wealth; and therefore prayed that it might be read.

Against which Sir Francis Knolles Knight, Treasurer of her Majesties Houshold spake first, but in few words; and after him Sir Christopher Hatton Knight her Majesties Vice-Chamberlain more largely, who pressed and moved the House so far therein, that it was at length resolved, that the said Book and Bill should not be read. But touching all necessary and sit liberty of the aforesaid Ministers, or supply of able men, in places that wanted, they did not doubt but that her Majesty would take some speedy order concerning the same, according to whatsoever was justly required, either in the aforesaid Petitions that had been read, or in the last mentioned Book and Bill, the reading whereof had been forborn: of which also the said Mr. Vice-Chamberlain did affirm that he doubted not but that it would be done accordingly. Vide concerning this business on Saturday the 27th day of March following.

He also further moved that for the better and more speedy expedition of other great matters now in hand, this Court would be pleased to appoint to sit again at two of the Clock this Afternoon to give reading to a Bill but now lately finished, wherein provision was made for the safety and preservation of the Queens Majesties most Royal Person. Which he the rather desired, because he conceived that this House would very shortly be adjourned till after Christmas.

The Bill against fraudulent Conveyances was read the third time.

Post Meridiem.

In the Afternoon the before-mentioned Bill for provision to be made for safety of the Queens Majesties most Royal Person, and the quiet State of the Realm, was read the first time.

The Bill also for provision of maintenance for Ministers and Preachers in Towns Corporate, &c. was after the second reading and much dispute, put to the question, whether it should be committed; and upon the division of the House, the major part of the Voices fell out to be against the commitment. After which also upon another Question whether it should be ingrossed or no, the Bill it self was lastly upon another division of the House dashed.

The Bill lastly for Confirmation of Letters Patents made unto Mr Walter Rawleigh was read the second time and committed unto Mr Vice-Chamberlain, Mr Secretary, Sir Philip Sidney, Sir Francis Drake, Sir Richard Greenfield, Sir William Courtnay, Sir William Mohun and others.

On Tuesday the 15th day of December three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the first being for the relief of the Creditors of Edward Fisher Esquire, was after the second reading committed unto Mr Sollicitor, Mr Morrice, Mr Cromwell, Mr John Fisher and Mr Cradock, who were appointed to meet at two of the Clock this Afternoon in LincolnsInn-Hall.

The Committees for Mr Rawleighs Bill were appointed to meet presently in the CommitteeChamber of this House.

The Bill for the good Government of the City of Westminster was after the second reading, committed unto Sir George Carie, Mr Recorder of London, Mr Thomas Knivet, Mr Thomas Cecill and others, who were appointed to meet this Afternoon in the open Exchequer-Court.

The Bill against Informers was brought in by Mr Vice-Chamberlain one of the Committees, in the name of all the Committees, with allowance of the same; only he further moved the reviving and continuing the former Act in that behalf made in the 18th year of her Majesties Reign.

The Bill for provision to be made for the surety of the Queens Majesties most Royal Person and the good estate of the Realm, was upon the second reading Ordered to be ingrossed.

The Bill for bringing in of Staple Fish and Ling was brought in again by Sir Edward Dymock one of the Committees, without any thing done in the same; for that the Committees could not in their meeting assent to any alteration of the same Bill.

The Bill against Jesuits, Seminary Priests, and such like disobedient persons, was upon the second reading ordered to be ingrossed.

On Wednesday the 16th day of December three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the second being a new one touching Hue and Cry, was read the first time.

Mr Ash one of the Committees in the Bill for Swearing of Under-Sheriffs, in the name of himself and the residue of the same Committees brought in the old Bill, and also a new Bill framed by them, praying the reading thereof.

Mr Treasurer, one of the Committees in the Bill for disposing of Parsonages impropriate to charitable and pious uses, for himself and the residue of the same Committees brought in the old Bill, and also a new Bill praying the reading thereof.

The Bill for perfecting of Assurances was upon the second reading committed unto Mr Sollicitor, Mr Atturney of the Wards, Mr Sands and others, and the Bill was delivered to Mr Sollicitor, who with the rest was appointed to meet to morrow in the Afternoon in Lincolns-Inn-Hall.

After some Motions made touching the former Petitions exhibited and read in this House on Monday the 14th day of this instant November foregoing, which concerned the liberty of some Ministers, and the placing of others in places that wanted, many Arguments ensuing; but it was at last resolved upon the motion of Sir Walter Mildmay Chancellor of the Exchequer (who spake exceeding well touching this business) that some Committees should be appointed by the House to view over the said Petitions, and to reduce the contents of the same into some particular Heads or Articles, which being put in writing, might be imparted unto the Lords of the Upper House, and that request might thereupon be made to their Lordships to joyn with the House of Commons in such further course as should be thought meet. And thereupon divers Committees were chosen to consider of the said business accordingly, viz. Sir Thomas Heneage, Sir Thomas Manners, Mr Rawleigh, Mr Sollicitor, Mr George Cary, Sir Edward Dymock, Sir Robert Germin, Sir William Herbert, Sir John Higham, Mr Cromwell, Mr Doctor Hammond, Mr Doctor James and Mr Edward Lewkenor, who were appointed to meet this Afternoon in the Exchequer-Chamber for that purpose. Vide plus concerning this business on Monday the 21th day of this instant December following, and on Thursday the 25th of February ensuing.

After which the House conceiving the weight of this business required a greater number of Committees, did further nominate these following, viz. Mr Atturney of the Wards, Mr Beale, Mr Candish, Mr Blage the Master of the Requests, Mr. Wolley, Mr. Doctor Fletcher, Mr. Skinner, Mr. William Stoughton, Mr. Thomson, Mr. Recorder, Mr. Morrice, Mr. Alford, Sir William Moore and Mr. Wroth, who were appointed to meet this Afternoon at the place aforesaid.

Two Bills, lastly, had each of them one reading; of which the second being the Bill for the continuation and explanation of certain Statutes, was read the first time.

On Thursday the 17th day of December the Bill for assurance of certain Lands of Sir Thomas Lucy and others was upon the second reading committed unto Mr. Digby, Mr. Barker, Mr. Cradock and others, who were appointed to meet tomorrow in the Middle Temple Hall.

The Bill for confirmation of Letters Patents granted unto Mr. Walter Rawleigh, was brought in by the Committees not altered in any word; and upon motion for ingrossing, was after some Arguments upon the Question, ordered to be ingrossed.

Mr. Doctor Awberry and Mr. Doctor Barkeley did bring from the Lords two Bills; the one for the restitution in blood of the Lord Thomas Howard, and the other for the paving of Newarke upon Trent; with request from the Earl of Rutland unto Mr. Speaker for expediting of the same Bill for the paving of Newark upon Trent.

The Bill against Jesuits, Seminary Priests, and such like disobedient Subjects, having upon the third reading passed the House, was sent up to the Lords by Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer and others.

The Bill upon the reading passed the House with little or no Argument, except it were from one Doctor Parry, who in very violent terms spake directly against the whole Bill, affirming it to favour of Treasons, to be full of blood, danger, despair and terrour or dread to the English Subjects of this Realm, our Brethren, Uncles and Kinsfolks, and also full of Confiscations, but unto whom? Not, said he, to her Majesty, (which he wished they were) and said, he did not think the contrary, but that zeal would cause the Bill to have passage both in this House and with the Lords, but yet he hoped when it should come into her Highness most merciful hands, that it would stay and rest there; until which time (he said) he would reserve his reasons of his negative voice against the Bill, then to be discovered by him only unto her Majesty. Whereupon Dr. Parry, by Order of this House, was appointed to be requestred into the outer Room of this House into the Serjeants Custody, and without conferring with any, whiles the matter now in question concerning his former Speeches against the Bill last passed is in debating or arguing, until he shall be called in again. And afterwards being brought to the Bar, and there kneeling upon his knee, he was told by Mr. Speaker in the name of the whole House, that if he thought good, the House was contented to hear him what reasons he could yield for himself in maintenance of his said Speeches against the aforesaid Bill to the better satisfaction of this House, or what other matter of excuse he could alledge touching his former contempt uttered in the Presence of this said House in very unseemly manner, and in unfitting words, in that he did speak so directly, reproachfully and absolutely against a Bill first travelled in and publickly allowed of in the House, and then considerately and maturely perused and digested by so great and grave a Committee selected and framed out of the ablest Members of this House, who having further diligently and dutifully laboured therein, and brought it again into the House with one unanimous approbation of it as of a good and necessary Bill; and that, lastly, it had been also so approved of this day, and upon the third reading had passed the House; and yet that he the said Doctor Parry had termed the said Bill to be a Bill favouring of Treasons, and to be full of Confiscations, blood, danger, despair and terrour to the Subjects of this Realm; and withal that he would well prove and justifie the same by good reasons, which nevertheless (he said) he would not deliver to this House; but would reserve them only to be revealed to her Majesty. Whereupon being further demanded, as aforesaid, what further excuse or defence he could make for himself, he answered, that what he had said (and bound it with a protestation) was without any intent of offence towards the Queens Majesty (to whom he owed all dutiful obedience) or towards the House; and made repetition of his said former words, and still avowed the justification of the same. And so entring into some declaration of his own estate tending altogether to his own credit, as of his sundry good Services done to her Majesty, his reputation with persons of good sort, and other such like Speeches in his own commendation, concluded in the end, that as before when he spake to the Bill, and gave his negative voice to the same, he then concealed his said reasons from this House, so he would now conceal the same still. Whereupon being sequestred again, it was resolved, That for that he did speak to the Bill and gave his negative voice so directly and undutifully, and in contempt of this House would not shew his reasons for the same, being meerly against the ancient Orders and usage of this High Court, and not for that he said he would shew them only to be discovered to her Majesty, it was resolved, That he should be committed to the Serjeants Ward till the matter shall be further considered of by this House, the day being then very far spent. Vide concerning this matter on Friday the 18th day, Wednesday the 23. day, and on Thursday the 24th day of this instant December following.

On Friday the 18th day of December the Bill touching Appeals out of the Ecclesiastical Court, was upon the second reading committed unto Mr. Treasurer, the Master of the Requests, Mr. Doctor Hammond, Mr. Sands, Mr. Cromwell, Mr. Doctor Cousin, Mr. Barker, Mr. Flower, Mr. Wolley, Mr. Beale; and the Bill was delivered to Mr. Treasurer, who with the rest was appointed to meet this Afternoon in the Exchequer-Chamber.

The Bill also for the restitution in blood of the Lord Thomas Howard had this day its first reading; and the Bill for confirmation of Letters Patents made unto Walter Rawleigh Esquire, was upon the third reading after many Arguments and a Proviso added unto it, passed upon the Question.

Sir Christopher Hatton Knight, her Majesties Vicechamberlain, declared unto the House, That her Majesty having heard of the great and dutiful care of this House in devising and providing of Laws for the preservation of her Majesties Royal Person, doth accept the same in most humble, loving and thankful part; and having thereupon inquired of the manner and parts of the same Laws, doth both very well like and allow of the same, and is also of her own most loving and merciful disposition pleased that all persons barred or disabled by force of the same Law, as it now is, shall be first called to answer and be heard what they can say in excuse of themselves, before they shall be prejudiced in their pretended Right or Titles. And also that her Majesty will take away the Proviso in that Law, by which any of these Subjects which have taken the Oath of Association, might any way hereafter by any possibility be touched in conscience. And then made a motion that a convenient Committee of the wise and grave Members of this House might be appointed to consider of the said former Bill already ingrossed, and so then to devise another to be conceived according to the purport of her Majesties Pleasure in that behalf, so as before is signified. Whereupon it was then resolved, that all the former Committees, and Mr George Ireland now added unto them, should meet together for that purpose this Afternoon in the Exchequer Chamber.

And further the said Mr Vice-Chamberlain also declared unto this House, that her Majesty having been made privy unto the mis-behaviour of Mr. Doctor Parry Yesterday shewed in this House, and of the order of this House taken therein with him for the same, her Highness doth not only deem him to have given just cause of offence unto this House in the same his misdemeanor, but also doth very well allow of the grave discretion of this House in forbearing for the time to use any sharp course of Correction against him for his said offence, in respect that he had said he reserved his reasons to be imparted to her Majesty only; which as he had discovered unto some of the Lords of the Council by her Highnesses appointment, and that partly to the satisfaction of her Majesty, so her Highness did think that upon his humble submission unto this House with a dutiful acknowledgment of his fault, this House would the rather dispense with him therein.

Which done, Mr Doctor Parry was called to the Bar, where humbly acknowledging his fault upon his knees, it was told him by Mr Speaker, after he had put him in remembrance of the manner of his offence, that it might be the House would nevertheless deal favourably with him, if they should see such cause upon his unseigned and earnest consession and repentance of his fault, and his humble submission unto the House with good and dutiful endeavour of amendment hereafter. And then kneeling upon his knee in very humble manner affirmed directly, that he had very undutifully misbehaved himself, and had rashly and unadvisedly uttered those Speeches he used, and was with all his heart very sorry for it; alledging withal that he had never been of this House before this Session, and so could not so well know the Orders of the House as he should do, and that he would not willingly ofsend this House nor any man in it, and so humbly prayed their good favour towards him.

Whereupon being sequestred again out of the House, it was after some Arguments and Speeches had, resolved, That upon that his said acknowledgment of his fault and his humble submission, he should be received into this House again as a Member of the same, and take his place as before, so that he would afterwards use himself in good sort as he ought to do. And thereupon being called again to the Bar, and there kneeling upon his knee, and directly reiterating his former consession of his fault, and also his former humble submission, protesting further that if ever after he should give any just cause of offence again to this House or any Member thereof, he would then never after crave any more favour of them.

Whereupon Mr Speaker declared the good pleasure of this House in remitting his said offence by receiving him again into them, with condition and hope of his better behaviour hereafter. Which as he prosessed and promised to perform accordingly, so did he in very good dutiful sort give most humble thanks unto God and to her Majesty, and also unto this whole House and every Member of the same, for their good, courteous and favourable dealing towards him in this behalf. Vide February the 18th and February the 24th postea.

On Saturday the 19th day of December four Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the second being the Bill touching the keeping of the great Sessions of the Peace and the Assizes for the Town of Caernarvon to be kept in the Town of Caernarvon, was read the third time. And the third being the Bi[ll] for restitution in blood of the Lord Thomas Howard had this day its second and third reading. And three Bills thereupon were at this time sent up to the Lords by Mr Treasurer and others, which had not been delivered, because their Lordships were risen and departed before their coming. Vide on December the 14th last past, when two of them had been sent up.

A Motion was made in the House, that their Lordships might be sent unto, to know the reason of the new manner of indorsing their Bills. For whereas in former times all Bills sent down from the Lords to the House of Commons were ever indorsed in the lower part of the same Bills; contrary to the said accustomed use, the Bills which were lately sent down from their Lordships, were indorsed in the upper or higher part of the same, which the said Mr Treasurer and the rest at this time sent up to the Upper House with the aforesaid three Bills, did accordingly impart to their Lordships. Vide plus de ista materia on Monday the 21th day of this instant December following.

The Bill for Hue and Cry was read the second time during the absence of Mr Treasurer and the rest, as aforesaid.

The reading of which Bill being ended, Mr Treasurer and the residue returning from the Lords, brought word, that he the said Mr Treasurer imparted unto their Lordships the Request of this House for Conference with their Lordships both for the Bill touching the Sabbath (de qua Billa vide on Wednesday the 17th day of March ensuing) and also for the Petitions of the griefs of this House; unto both which the Lords said, they would by and by send their Answer. Vide concerning Petitions on Thursday the 25th day of February ensuing.

Mr Vice-Chamberlain declared unto this House, That her Majesty graciously considering the great pains and careful travel of this House in the Service and Affairs of the Realm, hath determined upon Monday next to adjourn the Court of Parliament until some other convenient time after Christmas, that such Gentlemen and other Members of this House may the more conveniently repair home to their houses in the mean time for their better ease and recreation. And so moved further, That (as before that time of Adjournment being upon Monday next) there can nothing of great moment possibly be prepared to passing; so he wished that the same short time may be imployed in the speeding of such Bills as are nearest to the passing; and mentioned some of those which came unto us from the Lords, and that the residue may rest in the same case of furtherance in the mean time as now they are in.

Mr Serjeant Gawdy and Mr Doctor Ford did bring from the Lords again the Bill for the restitution in blood of the Lord Thomas Howard amended in the indorsement, viz. indorsed under the Bill, and the former indorsement above razed out.

The Bill for restitution in blood of the Lord Thomas Howard was sent up to the Lords by Mr Treasurer and others; and also the Bill for paving of the Town of Newark upon Trent, the Bill for the Town of Caernarvon, and the Bill for fraudulent Conveyances (all which came from their Lordships before not rightly indorsed) were sent up to their Lordships to have the same indorsements reformed and amended, as that in the Bill for the Lord Thomas Howard was before amended.

The Bill for the true answering of the Debts of Edward Fisher was read the first time. Vide on Monday the 22. day of February ensuing.

Mr Richard Lewkenor (one of the Committees in the Bill to avoid partial Juries and Tryals) in the name of himself and the residue of the same Committees brought in the old Bill, and also a new Bill, praying that the same new Bill may be read accordingly.

The Bill for reformation of Errours in Fines and Common Recoveries in the twelve Shires of Wales, was upon the second reading committed unto Mr Sollicitor, Sir William Herbert, Mr Penruddock, Mr David Williams and others, who were appointed to meet upon Thursday next in the Afternoon in Lincolns-Inn-Hall. After which the Bill for continuance and explanation of divers Statutes, had its second reading.

Mr Serjeant Gawdy and Mr Doctor Barkeley did bring from the Lords the Bill touching the Sabbath day, with Message from their Lordships, that they can find by no Precedent that they can now add any thing at all (upon our Conference) to their former Additions inserted into the said Bill, and do think withal, that those things we desire are already provided for in their said Additions as the Bill now standeth; and do therefore pray, that being so good a Bill as this is, they will have care it do not miscarry; and so departed. Whereupon it was then thought good to reserve the Bill, in state as it was, till it may be further considered of by view of the Precedents of this House in like cases. And Sir Thomas Heneage, Mr Sollicitor, Mr Recorder, Sir William Moore, Mr Cromwell, and Mr Sandes were appointed to search the Precedents of this House for that purpose in the mean time of the next sitting of this Court after the said Adjournment. Vide plus de ista materia on Wednesday the 17th day of February ensuing.

The Bill for the preservation of Grain was ordered upon the Question to be discontinued; and divers others of no great moment, as touching Ecclesiastical Livings, Maintenance of the Navy, and the like, were continued until the end of this Adjournment, which was now drawing on on Monday next, being the 21th day of December. And the Committees appointed for the continuance of them were these following, viz. Mr Vice-Chamberlain, Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir Thomàs Heneage, Sir Thomas Cecil, Sir William Moore, Mr Sollicitor, Mr Lieutenant of the Tower, Sir Richard Knightely, Mr Francis Hastings, Sir Nicholas Woodroose, Mr Dannet, Mr Haymond, Mr Cromwell, Mr Owen, Mr Rawleigh, Mr Grafton, Sir Francis Deake, Mr Doctor Hammond, Mr Wolley, Mr Grice, Sir Henry Nevill, Sir John Peter, Sir William Drury, Sir Robert Conestable, Sir Robert Germin, Sir Henry Cock, who were appointed to meet on Thursday after Christmas day in the Afternoon at two of the Clock at Ely place.

After Mr Vice-Chamberlain's late former Speeches delivered unto this House of her Majesties good and grateful acceptation of the earnest and dutiful care and proceedings of this House in providing for the safety of her most Royal Person, and of her Highnesses said most loving and favourable regard of adjourning this Court of Parliament for some such convenient time, as during which the greater part of the Members of this House may at their pleasure repair home to their dwellings, as well for their better recreations and ease, as for their further dealing in their own private affairs; it was moved by Mr. Speaker, That some due form or course of yielding unto her Majesty most humble and dutiful thanks for the same her said Highnesses most honourable and gracious acceptation and consideration, in the name and behalf of this whole House, in most loyal, humble, dutiful and obedient manner, may be considered of and devised. Whereupon after a few Speeches resolved and prayed, that the same should and might be done most fitly and conveniently by those honourable Personages Members of this House, which are of her Majesties most honourable Privy Council, who being then present, did very willingly and honourably undertake to execute the same most faithfully and effectually.

On Monday the 21th day of December three Bills of no great moment had each of them one reading; of which the first being the Bills for the true payment of the Debts of Edward Fisher Esquire, was after the second reading committed to the former Committees, (who were appointed on Tuesday the 15th day of this instant December foregoing) and Mr. Recorder was added unto them. Vide February the 22th Monday postea.

The second of the said Bills being for Hue and Cry, was brought in again by the Committees somewhat amended; and the amendmen's being twice read, the Bill with the said amendments was ordered to be ingrossed, and the third Bill touching Under-Sheriffs had its first reading.

Mr. Sollicitor and Mr. Recorder were added to the former Committees for Sir Thomas Lucy's Bill.

Sir George Cary, one of the Committees in the Bill for the good Government of the City of Westminster, in the name of himself and the residue of the Committees, brought in the Bill with some amendments.

Mr. Treasurer declared that he and the residue of this House which are of her Majesties PrivyCouncil, did yesterday according to the charge of this House laid upon them recommened unto her Majesty the most humble, dutiful and loyal thanks of this House for her Highnesses good nion conceived of this whole House, and her loving and thankful acceptation of their Service; which as (he said) her Majesty did take in most loving and good part, so did he refer her Highness's further Answer therein to the report of Mr Vice-Chamberlain, being charged by her Majesty to deliver the same Speeches unto this House from her Highness.

Whereupon Sir Christopher Hatton Knight her Majesties Vice-Chamberlain standing up did very eloquently and very earnestly set forth her Majesties most Princely, gracious and kind acceptation of the humble and most dutiful thankfulness of this House so presented unto her Highness, to her right great and high satisfaction, joy and comfort; and declared withal that her Highness did for the same give most hearty and loving thanks unto this whole House, yea and that in redoubling to them their thanks ten thousand thousand fold; and so further very excellently, amply and aptly shewed both the ready, careful and obedient affections of this whole House to the dutiful service of her Majesty, and also on the other side her Highness incomparable Princely accompt and regard of all such loyal, loving and faithful Subjects; and concluded, that her Majesties pleasure was, that this House should well know, that in the consideration of the free course of the Gospel of Jesus Christ amongst us, our long continued Peace and plenty of Gods good Blessings and Benefits bestowed upon us under the Ministry of her Highness, her Majesty doth most sincerely ascribe all the same only and wholly to the great goodness and mercy of Almighty God, attributing the cause of these good effects (next under Gods Providence) to the good demerits of so religious, godly and obedient Subjects, of whom how well and kindly her Majesty doth think and conceive, her Highness had much rather have told them in her own most Royal Person, than have signified it unto them by any other, if it might have conveniently been so done, as upon the opportunity of a Prorogation or Dissolution of this Court. And further declared, that her Majesty having regard to the great charges and expences of their attendance in the service of this great Council of the Realm, wisheth them at their next meeting again to bestow the time as much as may be in publick and general Actions fittest for the Common-Weal of this Realm, and that with as little loss of time as may be. And withal, that those of this House towards the Law would join together to do their best endeavours to devise some good Laws to abridge and cut off the long tedious courses and extream chargeable Circuits and superfluous delays of Suits in Law; not doubting but that in so doing God will bless their Wealth and good Estates, both in themselves and in their Posterity. And so having, as he thought, dutifully imparted unto them the sum and substance of her Majesties Pleasure and Message committed unto this House by him, though not in such effectual and singular kind terms and forms as her Princely Wisdom delivered the same unto him; and so referring himself to the residue of this House of her Majesties Council then and now present to be put in remembrance by them, if he have omitted any part thereof, and they affirming he had not, he ended his Speech.

Mr Doctor Ford and Mr Doctor Barkeley did bring from the Lords the Bills amended in the indorsement, which before were sent from this House unto them for that purpose, after they had been first sent unto this House from their Lordships.

Nota, That on Saturday the 19th day of December last past the House of Commons taking exceptions at this last mentioned matter about indorsing of Bills in the upper parts of them, whereas it ought to be done at the nether and lower part, the Lords did very respectively both then and now take away their said grievance by the alteration of the indorsements aforesaid according to the usual and ancient form.

Mr. Treasurer touching the Petitions and grievances of this House drawn into some certainty of convenient particularities to be then afterwards moved by them unto the Lords by way of Petition, and request unto their Lordships in the name of this whole House to join with this House in the considerations of the said Petitions and grievances, and to exhibite unto her Majesty the humble suit of this House in that behalf, shewed, that he and the residue of the Committees according to the charge of this House unto them, have sundry times met together and set down in writing such particular Contents of the said Petitions and griefs as they resolved to impart unto the Lords. And further, that having moved their Lordships already in the matter, they have received Answer, that when their Lordships have further considered and conferred thereof amongst themselves, they will then send for the said Committees of this House to receive their Lordships Answer therein. Vide concerning this business on Thursday the 25th day of February ensuing.

Word was brought to Mr. Speaker by the Serjeant of this House, that one at the Door was come from the higher House to require that the Committees of this House do presently repair unto their Lordships; which done and signified unto this House by Mr. Speaker, the said Committees went up presently unto their Lordships accordingly.

Mr. Sollicitor touching the returns of some Knights returned into this present Parliament, and for some doubts and questions arising in this House upon the same, and afterwards by this House referred unto him and Mr Recorder of London for making of search of the returns of the Writs and Indentures thereof, shewed, that they can only find the cause of this question to arise upon the Election of Mr. Bevill and Mr. Darrington to be Knights for the County of Huntington, which they are the rather confident of, because none others attended them or came unto them in this matter but only the said Elected Knights, who, as those also who opposed them, brought their Councel on both sides, and were fully heard what they could say: After which also Mr. Recorder and himself desiring fully to inquire into this matter, had conferred and devised therein with the Clerk of the Crown-Office in the Chancery, and comparing those Records together with some of the Statutes Ordained in those Cases, they do find such difference in them tending to matter of effect, and to be Answered by the Sheriff if there be cause, and not for any matter in their opinions for this House to deal with, whereby to cassate or make void the said Election as they take it. And yet because that resteth now chiefly upon matter of Precedents to see further how this House may decide this cause, he declared, that Mr. Recorder and he will make further search of the Precedents in like Cases with the Clerk of the higher House for that purpose, and then further to advertise this House as cause shall require. Vide concerning this matter on Tuesday the 8th day, and on Saturday the 12th day of this instant December foregoing.

The Bill for the preservation of the Haven of Plymouth, was upon the second reading committed unto Sir Francis Drake, Mr Wroth, Mr. Edgcombe and others, who were appointed to meet the third day of the next sitting of this Court in Lincolns-Inn Hall in the Afternoon of the same day.

A new Bill that Parsonages impropriate may be disposed to godly and charitable uses, was read the first time.

Mr. Sollicitor touching the excessive number of penal Laws in force, very intolerable to the Subjects, neither possible to be kept, and yet not any put in Execution, as that for Apparel in King H. 8. his time and such like, moved that a Committee be had of some selected Members of this House learned in the Laws to make a view of the same Laws against the next sitting of this Court after the Adjournment of the same, to the end that this House may then thereupon proceed to some course of diminishing the great number of the same, as upon due considerations in that behalf to be had shall be further thought meet and convenient. And thereupon were named and chosen for that purpose all the PrivyCouncil being of this House, Mr. Sollicitor, Mr. Recorder of London, Mr. Morrice, Mr. Sandes, Mr. Attorney of the Wards and others, who were appointed to meet on Wednesday before the next Term in the Afternoon in LincolnsInn Hall.

The Bill for paying of the Town of Newark upon Trent, after the third reading, passed upon the question.

Mr. Treasurer and the residue of the Committees returning from the Lords he declared, that they have received some Answer from their Lordships upon the Conference, and referred the report thereof to Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, as unto whom the same was by their said Lordships appointed to be delivered over unto this House. Whereupon

Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer declared, that their Lordships had caused the said Notes in writing to be read in the House, and their Lordships found the said grievances to concern but some particular Countries and not the whole Realm, to wit, the Countries only of Warwick, Lincoln and Essex, and therefore might be considered to be reformed in time by some other convenient means: But being Answered by the Committees of this House, that albeit there were Petitions in writing exhibited but for these three Counties, yet by Motions and Speeches in the House it well appeared to be the grief of the whole Realm. Which their Lordships having understood did feelingly express how sensible they were of it, and how truly they did join with us of the House of Commons in wishing the reformation thereof, and were now ready to aid us with their best assistances therein as erst in the two last former Sessions of Parliament they had done, at both which times her Majesty had thereupon Commanded some of the Lords of the Clergy to take care and consideration of the same causes, wherein as little or nothing hath been done for ease or redress of the same, so their Lordships of the Upper House (not minding to impute the fault thereof to any, and yet remembring withal that their Lordships were present when her Majesty by the Mouth of the Lord Chancellor did give Commandment unto Mr. Speaker not to deal in the House of Commons with matters concerning Religion or the Church without her Highness pleasure first known, and therefore do also take the same Commandment to extend as well to their Lordships as to this House) have resolved that those of the Lords which are of her Majesties Privy-Council do first move her Highness to know her Majesties Pleasure therein before they proceed any further in the matter.

The Lord Chief Justice of England, the Lord Chief Justice of the Common-Pleas, the Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer and the Master of the Rolls being sent down from the Lords to the House of Commons and admitted into the said House, the said Lord Chief Justice having in his hand a Commission under the Great Seal of England declared unto Mr. Speaker that her Majesty having given Authority by Commission under the Great Seal of England unto divers of my Lords the Bishops, Earls and Barons of the Upper House to Adjourn this Parliament unto the 4th day of February next coming, the said Lords Commissioners have Adjourned the same in the Upper House, and their Lordships have thereupon also sent them to this House to signifie the same Adjournment over unto this House, that the Knights, Citizens and Burgesses and Barons of this House may likewise take notice of the same Adjournment accordingly. Which thing was also after their departure out of this House declared unto this House by Mr. Speaker. And so thereupon this Court by Warrant and in form aforesaid, was adjourned unto the said 4th day of February next coming.

Which done, Mr Vice-Chamberlain standing up and putting the House in remembrance of her Majesties most Princely and loving kindnesses signified unto this House in the former Messages and Declarations of her Highnesses thankful acceptations of the dutiful cares and travails of this House in the Service of her Majesty and the Realm, moved the House, that besides the rendring of our most humble and Loyal thanks unto her Highness, we do, being assembled, altogether joyn our hearts and minds together in most humble and earnest prayer unto Almighty God for the long continuance of the most prosperous preservation of her Majesty, with most due and thankful acknowledgment of his infinite benefits and blessings poured upon this whole Realm through the mediation of her Highnesses Ministry under him. And he said, he had a Paper in writing in his hand devised and set down by an honest, godly and learned man, and which, albeit it was not very well written, yet he would willingly read it as well as he could, if it pleased them to follow and say after him, as he should begin and say before them. Which being assented unto most willingly of all the whole House, and every one kneeling upon his knees, the said Mr ViceChamberlain begun the said prayer. Which being ended, every one departed away for that time, until the said day of Adjournment.

Nota, That the aforesaid Commission did bear date this present 21th day of December, and that this Parliament was adjourned by it from the said day unto the 4th day of February ensuing, which was for the space of forty four days; at the end of which said days either House met again according to their usual and accustomed manner as followeth, (viz.)