Chamber Administration
Lord Chamberlain, 1660-1837

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

R.O. Bucholz

Year published

2006

Supporting documents

Pages

1-8

Citation Show another format:

'Chamber Administration: Lord Chamberlain, 1660-1837', Office-Holders in Modern Britain: Volume 11 (revised): Court Officers, 1660-1837 (2006), pp. 1-8. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43760 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

CHAMBER Administration

Lord Chamberlain 1660–1837

According to The Present State of the British Court,

The Lord Chamberlain has the Principal Command of all the Kings (or Queens) Servants above Stairs (except in the Bedchamber, which is wholly under the Grooms [sic] of the Stole) who are all Sworn by him, or by his Warrant to the Gentlemen Ushers. He has likewise the Inspection of all the Officers of the Wardrobe of the King's Houses, and of the removing Wardrobes, Beds, Tents, Revels, Musick, Comedians, Hunting, Messengers, Trumpeters, Drummers, Handicrafts, Artizans, retain'd in the King's or Queen's Service; as well as of the Sergeants at Arms, Physicians, Apothecaries, Surgeons, &c. and finally of His Majesty's Chaplains. (fn. 1)

The lord chamberlain was appointed by the Crown. Until 1783 his entry into office was marked by the reception of a staff; thereafter more usually of a key. (fn. 2) He was sworn by the vice chamberlain in pursuance of a royal warrant issued for that purpose. (fn. 3) Wherever possible appointments have been dated by reference to the former event; in other cases by reference to the warrant or certificate of swearing.

The remuneration attached to the office consisted of an ancient fee of £100 and board wages of £1,100 making a total of £1,200 a year. The lord chamberlain also received plate worth £400, livery worth £66 annually and fees of honour averaging between £24 and £48 a year early in the eighteenth century. Shrewsbury received a pension of £2,000 during his last year of office 1714–15. An annuity of £3,000 from the Exchequer, originally granted to Grafton 1724–57, was continued to his successors, bringing their total fixed remuneration to £4,200. (fn. 4) In addition, the lord chamberlain was entitled to lodgings at court and used mourning cloth. (fn. 5)

1660 1 June Manchester,2nd Earl of
1671 13 May St. Albans, 1st Earl of
1674 11 Sept Arlington, 1st Earl of
1685 30 July Ailesbury, 1st Earl of
1685 23 Oct. Mulgrave, 3rd Earl of
1689 14 Feb. Dorset, 6th Earl of
1697 19 Apr. Sunderland, 2nd Earl of
1697 26 Dec. Office vacant
1699 30 Oct. Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of
1700 24 June Jersey, 1st Earl of
1704 24 Apr. Kent, 12th Earl of
1710 14 Apr. Shrewsbury, 1st Duke
1715 8 July Bolton, 2nd Duke of
1717 13 Apr. Newcastle, 1st
1724 14 May Grafton, 2nd Duke of
1757 18 May Devonshire, 4th Duke of
1762 24 Nov. Marlborough, 4th Duke of
1763 26 Apr. Gower, 2nd Earl
1765 15 July Portland, 3rd Duke of
1766 29 Nov. Hertford, 1st Earl of
1782 7 Apr. Manchester, 4th Duke of
1783 9 Apr. Hertford, 1st Earl of
1783 26 Dec. Salisbury, 7th Earl of
1804 14 May Dartmouth, 3rd Earl of
1810 10 Nov. Office vacant
1812 7 Mar. Hertford, 2nd Marquess of
1821 14 Dec. Montrose, 3rd Duke of
1827 2 May Devonshire, 6th Duke of
1828 23 Feb. Montrose, 3rd Duke of
1830 8 Aug. Jersey, 5th Earl of
1830 22 Nov. Devonshire, 6th Duke of
1834 15 Dec. Jersey, 5th Earl of
1835 23 Apr. Wellesley, 1st Marquess
1835 20 May Conyngham, 2nd Marquess

Vice Chamberlain 1660–1837

The vice chamberlain `is Deputy or Assistant to the Ld. Chamberlain, and in his Absence Commands.' Since many lords chamberlain were virtual absentees, much of the authority for making day-to-day decisions about the Chamber fell on the shoulders of the vice chamberlain. He was appointed by royal warrant. The remuneration amounted to £559 8s 4d consisting of wages of £66 13s 4d and board wages of £492 15s, plus lodgings. (fn. 6) On leaving office in 1694 Lowther was granted the arrears of an annuity of £600 at the Exchequer which was said to have been enjoyed by some of his predecessors. From this date this annuity was regularly granted to holders of the office on their appointment, bringing their total fixed income to £1,159 8s 4d. (fn. 7) During Anne's reign Coke received an annual allowance of £1,000 from the privy purse in addition to his other remuneration. (fn. 8)

1660 2 June Carteret, Sir G.
1680 2 Sept. Savile, H.
1687 8 Mar. Porter, J.
1689 23 Feb. Lowther, Sir J.
1694 19 Feb. Bertie, Hon. P.
1706 3 Dec. Coke, T.
1727 17 May Stanhope, W.
1730 7 May Hervey, Lord
1740 23 Apr. Beauclerk, Lord S.
1742 13 July Finch, Hon. W.
1765 20 July Villiers, Viscount
1770 24 Feb. Robinson, Hon. T.
1771 5 Feb. Hinchingbrooke, Viscount
1782 3 May Chewton, Viscount
1784 16 Nov. Herbert, Lord
1794 27 Jan. Greville, Hon. C.F.
1804 11 July Thynne, Lord J.
1812 14 Mar. Yarmouth, Earl of
1812 28 July Jocelyn, Viscount
1821 7 Feb. Graham, Marquess of
1827 5 May Hulse, Sir S.
1830 8 Aug. Belfast, Earl of
1834 29 Dec. Castlereagh, Viscount
1835 2 July Fitzroy, Lord C.

Lord Chamberlain's Secretariat and Office 1660–1837

The lord chamberlain was served by a number of officials who were appointed by and were immediately responsible to him. From the Restoration he had the services of a secretary. Richard Coling was assisted throughout his period of service (1660–97) by a deputy secretary, his brother Benjamin, (fn. 9) but this office appears to have lapsed thereafter. From 1707 John Evans occurs as clerk in the office. At his death in 1734 he was described as deputy secretary. (fn. 10) Thereupon two individuals were appointed to the distinct posts of deputy secretary and first clerk. From 1748 a second clerk is listed. In 1758 Robert Griffin, formerly first clerk, is listed as deputy secretary together with one other clerk. From the following year the pattern of a deputy secretary and two clerks was resumed. (fn. 11) In 1782 the office of deputy secretary was abolished. (fn. 12)

After 1782 the growing responsibilities of the lord chamberlain resulting from the abolition of the great wardrobe, the jewel office, the board of works and the office of treasurer of the Chamber necessitated the appointment of further staff. From 1785 two assistant clerks were listed and a third assistant had been appointed by 1800. (fn. 13) In 1801 the office of superintendent of payments was created. (fn. 14) In 1823 the secretariat underwent a substantial modification. Two new senior posts, one designated comptroller of accounts and superintendent of the duties of the department and the other inspector of accounts, were created. The former first clerk was designated chief clerk and the second clerkship abolished. Thereafter the establishment consisted of the secretary, the comptroller, the chief clerk, the inspector, the superintendent and three assistant clerks. (fn. 15) The office of secretary was abolished in 1830 whereupon the comptroller became the senior executive officer under the lord chamberlain. (fn. 16)

The salary of the secretary, originally £60, was raised to £580 in 1782. In that year the salaries of the two clerks were fixed at £200 and £110. (fn. 17) In 1823 provision was made as follows: secretary £750, comptroller £400, chief clerk, inspector and superintendent £300 and the three assistant clerks £200, £180 and £150. (fn. 18) In 1831 the salary of the comptroller was fixed at £700. (fn. 19)

In addition, from 1812 a series of inspectors of deliveries was established. The inspector of household deliveries at St. James's was `considered to be held during life or Good Behaviour' and made £500 plus £91 5s board wages and £29 5s in compensation for loss of perks. That for Windsor served during pleasure and made £400. (fn. 20) The running porter made £40 per annum, the porter £30 in 1782. (fn. 21) By 1836 the office porter made £60 plus £16 5s in fees, an £80 allowance as an assistant in the pay office and £50–60 in gratuities from individuals receiving payment. (fn. 22) By 1836 the office messenger made £60 plus £50 as assistant in the office, plus £182 10 s `for going to and from the General Post Office three times a day with the King's Bag and Boxes so heavy and large that a coach is frequently hired to convey them'. (fn. 23) The chamber keeper made £60 by 1836. (fn. 24)

Secretary 1660–1837

1660 Colinge, R.
1697 Apr. Stanley, J.
1719 May Pelham, J.
1761 Wilmot, Sir R.
1772 Keene, W.
1782 20 Apr. Herbert, C.
1783 Keene, W.
1783 Calvert, J.

Deputy Secretary 1660–1837

1660 Colinge, B.
By1734 Evans, J.
1734 Maddockes, C.
By1758 Griffin, R.
By1759 Wilmot, Sir R.
1761 Bonfoy, N.
1762 Dec. Trevor, R.
By 1778 Price, F.

Clerks c. 1707–1837

By 1707 Evans, J.
By 1736 Griffin, R.
By 1748 Suft, C.
By 1755 Lewis, R.
By 1759 Ely, W.
By 1759 Errat, E.
1762 Apr. Crucifix, R.
By 1768 Wilmot, R.
By 1772 Wilmot, G.
By 1775 Ely, J.
By 1776 Betty, S.
1793 6 Sept. Hale, J.
1806 22 Jan. Mash, T.B.
1816 13 Feb. Martins, W.
1837 10 Jan. Edison, C.S.

Assistant Clerks c. 1785–1837

By 1785 Benning, A.
By 1785 Bradburne, G.
By 1786 Parsons, J.
1789 8 Aug. Browell, H.
By 1793 Minshull, W.
1799 7 Dec. Thomas, J.
By 1800 Ely, J.
1800 5 Apr. Dance, E.
1806 22 Jan. Martins, W.
1807 24 Apr. Todhunter, W.
1816 13 Feb. Mash, H.T.B.
1819 24 May Browell, H.
1823 6 Jan. Colman, E.C.
1823 6 Jan. Thomas, J.
1825 4 May Edison, C.S.
1826 10 Oct. Browell, E.M.
1832 11 Dec. Hampshire, W.
1834 30 Dec. Bainbridge, G.M.
1835 19 Nov. March, T.C.
1837 10 Jan. Tupper, D.

Superintendent of Payments 1801–1837

1801 6 Jan. Mash, T.B.
1806 22 Jan. Browell, H.
1834 30 Dec. Browell, H.
1835 19 Nov. Edison, C.S.
1837 10 Jan. Browell, E.M.

Comptroller 1823–1837

1823 6 Jan. Mash, T.B.
1837 10 Jan. Martins, W.

Inspector of Accounts 1823–1837

1823 6 Jan. Mash, H.T.B.
1825 4 May Browell, H.
1834 30 Dec. Edison, C.S.
1835 19 Nov. Browell, E.M.
1837 10 Jan. Hampshire, W.

Inspector of Household Deliveries at Carlton House 1812–?1830

1812 10 July Justsham, B.

Inspector of Household Deliveries at St. James's 1830–1837

1830 24 July Justsham, B.

Inspector of Household Deliveries at Windsor Castle 1828–1837

1828 10 Sept. Saunders, H.

?Under Clerks occ. 1693

By 1693 Colinge, C.
By 1693 Fordham, T.

Running Porter ( by 1792 Messenger) to the Lord Chamberlain 1782–1837

1782 29 Nov. Nost, J., sen.
1824 6 May Nost, J., jun.
1829 11 Sept. Wood, J.

Office Porter to the Lord Chamberlain 1782–1802; 1807–1837

1782 29 Nov. Nost, S.
By 1790 Fisher, J.
1802 5 Jan. Seymour, G.
1803 6 Jan. Martin, W.
By 1807 Fisher, T.
1810 5 Jan. Brown, J.
1827 Brown, G.

Chamber Keeper to the [Secretary to the] Lord Chamberlain by 1707–1837

By 1707 Sheppard, C.
By 1708 Maypowder, R.
By 1711 Sheppard, C.
By 1716 Vickars, J.
By 1727 Gains, -
By 1735 Brown, C.
By 1762 Burgess, W.
1776 24 Oct. Legard, J.
By 1787 Seymour, J.
1822 Moule, T.

Footnotes

1 PSBC, p. 21; see also Beattie, pp. 24–7.
2 LC 3/24 f. 2; LC 3/67 p. 162; LC 3/69 f. 111. In 1782 Manchester was described as receiving both a staff or wand and a key (LC 3/67 pp. 134, 138).
3 CSPD 1671, p. 238.
4 Bucholz, pp. 315 n 66, 318–19 n. 102; ; Beattie, pp. 182, 184, 209; T 53/65 p. 372.
5 Bucholz, p. 129.
6 PSBC, p. 21; LC 3/24 f. 2; Beattie, pp. 25–7, 184, 209.
7 CTB X, 532, 580; T 53/65, p. 371.
8 CTB XXX, 290–1.
9 E. Hatton, New View of London (1708) I, 341–2.
10 Chamberlayne (1707), p. 542; ibid. (1735) II, 56; GM (1734) IV, 452.
11 Chamberlayne (1736) II, 194; ibid. (1748) II, 105; CCR (1758), p. 75; ibid. (1759), p. 75.
12 LS 13/117, p. 72.
13 RK (1785), p. 88; LC 3/68, p. 59.
14 LC 3/68, p. 67.
15 LC 3/69, ff. 55–6.
16 LC 3/70, f. 2; LC 1/15 no. 1150.
17 CTB XXX, 182; LC 5/204, p. 221.
18 LC 3/21.
19 LC 1/15 no. 1150.
20 LC 3/72, pp. 426, 546.
21 LC 3/67, p. 150.
22 LC 3/72, pp. 612–13.
23 Ibid., pp. 618–19.
24 Ibid., p. 630.