Chamber Administration
Treasurer of the Chamber, 1660-1782

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

R.O. Bucholz

Year published

2006

Supporting documents

Pages

8-10

Citation Show another format:

'Chamber Administration: Treasurer of the Chamber, 1660-1782', Office-Holders in Modern Britain: Volume 11 (revised): Court Officers, 1660-1837 (2006), pp. 8-10. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43761 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Treasurer of the Chamber 1660–1782

The treasurer of the chamber was responsible for paying many Chamber and chapel salaries, messengers' and other bills for goods and services, and riding wages. The position was in the gift of the Crown. (fn. 1) The treasurer was admitted in pursuance of a warrant issued to the lord chamberlain for that purpose. Appointments were embodied in letters patent under the great seal. Both Griffins succeeded by virtue of life reversionary grants. Tenure from 1689 was during pleasure. The office was left vacant between 1692 and 1694. The fixed remuneration consisted of a salary of £314 1s 4d and a clerk's patent fee of £153 6s 8d amounting to a total of £469 8s. In addition, the treasurer of the chamber took fees of poundage on a sliding scale of between 4 and 5% depending on the size of the bill or salary being paid. Under Queen Anne, this yielded between £1,100 and £1,500 per annum; under George I, about £2,220. (fn. 2)

The treasurer was empowered to act by deputy and increasingly did so with the passage of time. The first identified deputy, John Richards, occurs from 1692 and acted during the absence of a principal 1692–4. (fn. 3) The succession is unclear from 1702 to 1714 but from 1714 the position of deputy was combined with that of clerk in the office and enjoyed the salary of £50, together with £200 which he received from his principal. (fn. 4)

The office of comptroller was created in 1690 with a salary of £150, appointments being made by Treasury constitution. (fn. 5)

The clerk was appointed by the treasurer of the Chamber. He was paid by the Treasury. By 1782 the chief clerk made £462 per annum in salary and gratuities. A second clerk made £204. The officekeeper made £102 10s. (fn. 6)

These offices were abolished in 1782. (fn. 7)

Treasurer 1660–1782

1660 9 June Griffin, Sir E.
1679 26 May Griffin, E.
1689 18 Apr. Gwynne, Sir R.
1692 11 May Office vacant
1694 8 Mar. Russell, Hon. E.
1702 22 June Fitzhardinge, 4th Viscount
1713 14 Sept. Delawarr, 6th Lord
1714 6 Dec. Radnor, 2nd Earl of
1720 30 May Pelham, Hon. H.
1722 12 Mar. Stanhope, C.
1727 23 Sept. Hobart, Sir J.
1744 24 Dec. Cotton, Sir J.H.
1746 12 June Arundell, Hon. R.
1755 27 Dec. Hillsborough, 1st Earl of
1756 14 Dec. Townshend, Hon. C.
1761 23 Mar. Dashwood, Sir F.
1762 2 Aug. Elliot, G.
1770 23 May Rice, G.
1779 27 Nov. Spencer, Lord C.

Deputy Treasurer c. 1692–1782

By 1692 Richards, J.
1698 Mar. Sizer, R.
1714 Dec. Holbech, J.
1720 May Fairfax, B.
1722 Keene, W.
1727 Britiffe, E.
1746 Sept. Powlett, A.
1754 Nov. Holland, --
1756 Jan. Semmer, R.
1756 Huske, J.
1761 Whitehead, P.
1763 Douglas, A.
1770 Owen, H.

Comptroller 1690–1782

1690 30 July Langford, S.
1690 30 Dec. Chudleigh, H.
1707 7 Nov. Vanbrugh, W.
1716 23 Nov. Nicholls, P.
1727 12 June Nelson, H.
1727 23 June Jenkins, E.
1736 2 Jan. Seymour, W.
1738 7 July Jones, T.
1757 5 Mar. Jones, T.

Deputy Comptroller of the Treasurer of the Chamber (by 1703–1708; by 1728–?1738)

By 1703 Vanbrugh, W.
1708 Office vacant
By 1728 Jones, T.

Clerks of the Household (occ. 1727–1748)

By 1727 Matthews, J.
By 1727 Robe, T.

Clerk to the Treasurer of the Chamber (c.1703–1727; 1756–?1782)

By 1703 Girardeau, M.
By 1707 Holbech, J.
By 1723 Keene, W.
By 1756 Adams, P.
By 1772 Webb, D.
By 1773 Webb, W.

Office Keeper to the Treasurer of the Chamber c. 1759–?1782

By 1757 Porter, J.
By 1763 Webb, W.
By 1773 Stokes, W.
By 1778 Eaton, J.

Footnotes

1 See PSBC, p. 32; Beattie, pp. 28–9, 120–1, 147–9.
2 CTB XVII, 1022; XXX, 182; Bucholz, p. 128; Beattie, p. 209. According to Beattie, p. 209, the established remuneration was reduced by £586 in 1720 for taxes, fees and salaries of personnel in the office.
3 Ibid . IX, 1578, 1696; X, 62, 115.
4 Ibid. XXIX, 506; Beattie, p. 205.
5 CTB IX, 745–6.
6 PSBC, p. 32; Shelburne MSS 125, p. 212.
7 22 Geo. III, c. 82.