Records of the Exchequer
1571-1611

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Institute of Historical Research

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John Hobson Matthews (editor)

Year published

1898

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Pages

393-422

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'Records of the Exchequer: 1571-1611', Cardiff Records: volume 1 (1898), pp. 393-422. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=48101 Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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R.O. Q.R. Memoranda Roll. 13 Eliz., Trin., rot. xlvij. 1571. Latin.

[Translation.]

Glamorgan to wit. By Henry, Earl of Pembroke, called to the Queen's remembrance for intrusion, &c., by the relation of Jenkyn Ryce and John Lawrence, servants of Edward Maunsell, esquire, Edward Stradlynge, esquire, &c.

Memorandum that Gilbert Gerrard, esquire, Attorney General of our Lady the Queen that now is, seeks judgment for our said Lady the Queen here in the Court, on the 25th day of June this term, in his own person; and for our said Lady the Queen gives the Court here to understand by the above said informations, that whereas a certain house called the "Sherehall," situate and being within the town of Cardyff in the County of Glamorgan, and a certain piece of land called "a grene," containing by estimation one acre, adjoining and pertaining to the same house called the Sherehall, parcel of the honour, seigniory and lordship of Glamorgan and Morgannock; and all royalties and royal prerogatives, namely, a mise of a thousand marks of lawful money of England, payable after the decease of every King of this Kingdom, by the tenants and inhabitants of the aforesaid honour, seigniory and lordship; and silver of the ward, called "Warde Syluer," of thirty six and three fourths knights' fees, wards, marriages, reliefs, tolls (otherwise called the "cense"), mainprise, casualties, escheats, mines of gold, silver and copper, and all other royalties due unto our Lady the now Queen, as Lady Marcher of the honour, seigniory and lordship of Glamorgan and Morgannock are, and of right aught to be, annexed to the honour, seigniory and lordship of Glamorgan and Morgannock aforesaid, in the County of Glamorgan, on the 28th day of June last past, namely, in the 12th year of the reign of our said lady the now Queen, as in the right of the honour, seigniory and lordship aforesaid, as in the several records, rolls and memoranda of this Exchequer more fully appears of record; nevertheless one Henry, Earl of Pembroke, not reverencing the laws of our said lady the now Queen, but intending the disherison of our said Lady the Queen in the premises, on the aforesaid 28th day of June, in the 12th year of the reign of our said lady the now Queen, by force and with arms in and upon the possession of our lady the Queen in the premises entered, intruded and made ingress, claims, ursurps and takes; and the rents, commodities, liberties, royalties, issues and profits thereof from the same 28th day of June in the 12th year aforesaid, until now, namely, until the day of the exhibition of this Information, to his own use takes and has, and up to the present time has taken and had, and continuing that trespass from the said 28th day of June until now, in disherison and contempt of our said lady the now Queen, and against her laws; wherefore the aforesaid Attorney General of our lady the now Queen, on behalf of our said lady the Queen, seeks the advice of the Court in the premises, and that the aforesaid Henry, Earl of Pembroke, come hither to answer unto our lady the Queen in the premises. Whereupon, &c.

And now, to wit, in the octave of the Holy Trinity, in the twenty second year of the reign of our lady the now Queen, comes hither the aforesaid Henry, Earl of Pembrok, by William Gray, his Attorney, and seeks a hearing of the Information aforesaid, and it is read to him. Which letter having been heard, and by him understood, he complains that, under colour of the premises in the said Information specified, a grantee has been vexed and disturbed, and this unjustly; protesting that the Information aforesaid, and the matter in the same contained, are not sufficient in Law, so that he has no necessity, and is not bound by the Law of the land, to answer for the aforesaid. Nevertheless, as to coming by force and with arms, or anything that is against the peace or in contempt of our said lady the now Queen, the same Henry, Earl of Pembrok, says that he is not guilty of anything thereof; and concerning this he puts himself on his country, and the aforesaid Attorney is silent. And as to entry and ingress into the aforesaid house called the Sherehall, situate and being within the aforesaid piece of land called a green, pertaining to the same house, and in all and singular the other premises in the Information aforesaid specified, he, Henry, Earl of Pembroke, says that the lord Edward the Sixth, late King of England, was of the aforesaid house called the Sherehall, and of the other premises in the Information aforesaid specified, seized in his demesne as of fee; and so being seized, he the late King acting by his Letters Patent given at Westminster on the seventh day of May in the fourth year of his reign, of his special favour and certain knowledge and mere motion, among other things gave and granted unto the most noble William, late Earl of Pembrok, now deceased, father of the before mentioned Henry, Earl of Pembrok, now deceased, by the name of William Herbert, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, then Master of his Horse, the aforesaid house called the Sherehall, and the other premises in the Information aforesaid specified among others, by the name of "all those towns and burgages "of Avon, Cowbridge and Cardiff, and all those his castles of Cardyff, Avon and Kenfigg, with all their rights, members and appurtenances, in the County of Glamorgan," to hold unto the same William, late Earl of Pembroke, his heirs and assigns, for ever. And further the same late King, of his more ample favour, by his same Letters Patent gave and granted unto the beforementioned William Herbert, his heirs and assigns, that they should have, hold and enjoy, and should and might be able to have, hold and enjoy, within the aforesaid lordships, manors, boroughs and towns and all and singular other the premises and each of them, and any and every parcel of them, as much, as many, such, the same, the like and similar courts leet, views of frankpledge [&c, citing the Letters Patent of 7 May 1551] as by the same Letters Patent among other things more fully appears. By virtue of which Letters Patent the beforementioned William, late Earl of Pembroke, upon the aforesaid lordships, towns, burgages and other the premises above specified (among others) entered and thereof was seized in his demesne as of fee; and so thereof seized, after his death the aforesaid lordships, burgages and other the premises above specified (among others) descended to the before mentioned Henry, now Earl of Pembroke; by pretext whereof the same Henry, now Earl of Pembroke, upon the aforesaid lordships, towns, burgages and other the premises above specified, (among others) entered and thereof was and still is seized in his demesne as of fee, and the issues and profits of the premises in the Information aforesaid specified for the whole time aforesaid in the Information aforesaid specified by force and pretext of the aforesaid Letters Patent of the said late King Edward the Sixth, above in that bar specified, to his own proper use has taken and had, and still takes and has, as he well and lawfully might and may. Without that That the same Henry, now Earl of Pembroke, in or upon the possession of the said Queen that now is, of the aforesaid house called the Sherehall, situate and being within the aforesaid town of Cardiff in the aforesaid County of Glamorgan, and the other premises in the Information aforesaid specified, or any parcel thereof, entered, intruded or made ingress, in manner and form as by the above Information is surmised. All and singular which things he, Henry, now Earl of Pembroke, is prepared to prove, as the Court, &c. Wherefore he prays judgment, and that he may be dismissed by this Court as to the premises.

R.O. Exchequer Special Commission. 15 Eliz. 1573. Glam. Latin.

[Translation.]

Inquisition taken at Cardyf.

The Jurors say that Edward Veghan . . . . . . on the day when he murdered one Philip Robin at Cornton in the county aforesaid, to wit, the first day of March in the [blank] year of the reign of our said Lady that now is, by reason of that murder by him perpetrated made flight and withdrew himself, and . . . . . . was seized in his demesne as of fee of and in one messuage and four acres of land, with the appurtenances, lying and being within the parish of llandoghe upon eley in the county aforesaid, of the yearly value of five shillings beyond reprise : and then held them of george herbert, knight, as of his manor of llandoghe, by fealty, suit of court and by the annual rent of 2d.. [Also a house and lands in the same parish ; and pasture called "llandoghes marshe" in the same parish; 30 cows, 6 oxen, 1 wain ; and house utensils worth 40s..]

R.O. Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 14—15 Eliz. 1573. Mich. 3. South Wales Customs, &c.

Regina versus John Leake, informer and customer of Cardiff, searcher and collector for 7 years past, as to what seizures he has made, &c. Alleged frauds on the Exchequer by the said Leake.

Among the deponents were John Robert ap Evan, Watkin Morgan and John Smith, Aldermen of Cardiff.

R.O. Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 26 and 27 Eliz. 1584. Mich. No. 30. Concealed Lands.

Thexaminac'ons of such as folowe taken at Bridgend the xxviijth of September and the ixth October Anno regni Regine n're Elizabethe etc. xxvjth before Edward mansell and Edward Stradelinge knights william mathwe and Anthonie mansell Esquiers by vertue of the Quenes mats. com'ission out of the Exchequer (touchinge concealed lands) to them addressed.

* * * *

Item Lewis ffroud of Cardief Alderma' of thage of lx yers or therabouts beinge sworne and exam'd saiethe that ther is one house in the towne of Cardief w'ch lieth n'r the town hall now in the occupac'on of will'm wells w'ch is called the towne house and was given to the towne but by whome he knowethe not & as he hard ijs. xjd. was given yearlie out of the said house to find a light, and more he knowethe not.

Item Thom's Spencer gente of thage of 1 years sworne and exam. saieth that the said howse w'ch mr. wells occupieth as he hard is concealed, and more he cannot saie.

It'm John Phillpot of laurnock yeoma' of thage of 1 years sworne and exam. saieth that ther is one acree of arable land nowe beinge in his occupac'on lyinge in the close of Dauid Scasie w'ch the said D'd had manie years in his occupac'on and paied rent to the proctors and as he hathe hard saie hit was given to the repa'c'on of the churche. And more he cannot say.

It'm Watkin Dio tho's of kelligaer of thage of 1 yeares beinge sworne and exam. saieth that in tyme past ther was in the said p'ishe a chaple called cappell gwladis in w'ch was masse and such like service w'th dim. acre of land wherin the chaple standethe, the chappell beinge nowe used as a house in occupac'on of Walter W'ms. and more he knoweth not.

* * * *

It'm Elizabeth gibbon of St. fagans of thage of lj years likewise sworne and exam'd saithe that of her owne knowledge she can saie nothinge but she hard by diuers persons that ther were xxx acrees of land given by Dauid Mathewe of the Radir to the chappell of St. fagans for the maintenaunce of a chauntrie preest, and that xx acrees of the said lands are in thands of mr. John gibbon and x acrees in her owne occupyinge, and more she knowethe not.

* * * *

[John Richards deposed that 5 acres called Jago's Land, at Cheriton, Glamorganshire, were charged with 100 lbs. of wax yearly to the church of Cheriton in alms for the donor's soul "& for all christen mens sowles."]

R.O. Exchequer Special Commission. 26 Eliz., 1584. 3446, Glam. Concealed Lands.

Inquisition taken at Bridgend, 15 October 1584.

We find that ther is concealed from her Ma[jes]tie ijs. xjd. yerelie issuing owt of the howse w[hi]ch wm wells holdeth wtin the towne of cardiff lyeing nere the towne hall & such have continewed concealed this xlij yers and who hath receyved the p'fitts therof they knowe not.

R.O. Exchequer Special Commission. 26 Eliz. 1584. 3445, Customs.

Deposic'ons taken at cardif the Seconde daie of October Anno regni re'ne n're Elizabethe &c xxvjto.

Robert Levell, of Cardif, deposith & saieth:—Butter goeth daily to sea, and he hath caried diu'se tymes butter to Bristoll; and there hath landed within theis five yeares xx kilterkyns of butter on the backe there in the boate of John tanner the younger, called the Trinitie, and now the boate of Hugh Richard of Penarth.

Richard Reading, of Landough. Hath seene corne sold by Edward Vaughan of Landogh to John Harding his shipp.

John Lockier, of cardif. Sawe a boate loaded with butter and corne vpon the greene there, this last som[m]er.

John Rawling. Caried w[i]th one michell thomas twentie kilterkyns of butter to the kaye of cardif, to the vse of will'm wickham of Bristoll.

Thomas Pierce, of cardif. Sawe two wayne loade of butter, and certen corne at another tyme, caried to Homanbye, w[hi]ch was put in one of the slaughter houses of cardif.

Thomas Moate, of cardif, searcher. Knoweth no butter, leather, corne or tallowe convaied awaie to the sea, saving butter, which he suffred to passe to Bristoll knowing hit to be but for their provision; & all other wares to be forfeited he seased on, and hath accompted for the same.

Interrogatories.

13. It. do you knowe, that there was loaden in the moneth of August was twelvemonthe, being the yere of or lorde 1583, from the backside of one Jenkyn thomas house, abouts 200 kilderkyns of butter of michaell Pepwells of Bristoll; ww[hi]chch was laden into the Margaret of cardif, of the burthen of xvj tonne, John Will'ms mr and owner?

14. It. what number of kylterkyns of Butter do you knowe to be laden in the Peter of Cardif?

15. It. whether did you knowe, that the said butter was privily laden and conveyed into diuerse vessells or boats in the night season, and whether Thomas Mote the searcher was privie thereof or not?

R.O. Exchequer Special Commission. 27 Eliz. 1585. 3448, Glam. Customs.

Anne Riccards, of cardiff, of thage of ffortie yeares or therabowts, sent to Bristow, as she remembreth, Twentie fyve kynterkyns of butter at one tyme, and Eleaven at another, to her house, there yet remayning; w[hi]ch she purposeth, god willing, to have solde there to her most benefitte, and that by cocket and Warrant.

Thomas Button, of Cardiff, gent., aged 30, was one of the deponents.

The "Jonas," of Cardiff, took a cargo of wheat beyond the sea, for William John of Radir, and other wheat purchased of Harry Mathew by the said William John.

The Commissioners, in certifying the execution of their Commissions, mention that the Jury were unable to obtain satisfactory evidence, "notwithstanding open proclamation by them made as well in the countie courte as in seuerall p'ishe churches."

R.O. Exchequer Special Commission. 11 Car. I. 1636. 5850, Glam. & Soms. Customs.

This Commission was held in pursuance of an order of Court that no coals should be carried from Wales to England without bond given that they should not be transported into foreign countries.

Vessels called "Trowes," i.e., flat-bottomed boats, of from twenty to forty tons burthen, belonging to Bridgwater, without masts, sails or tackling, traded between that town and Cardiff.

R.O. Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 28 Eliz. 1586. East. 15. Glam.

Thomas Bawdrip versus William Basset and others.

Will of William Bawdrip, Hundreds of Cardiff &c.

William Bawdrippe was seized of the Manor of Odyn's Fee in the parish of Penmark, and the moiety of the Splote by Cardiff, which descended unto the said Complainant as son and heir.

The Will of the said William Bawdripp was dated 28 May 1575.

R.O. Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 28 Eliz. 1586. Hil. 9., Glam.

Possessions of the late Matthew Herbert in Glamorgan since 3 Edw. VI. What Manors descended to his son Sir William Herbert, &c. &c.

At Cardiff.

Regina versus Sir William Herbert, knight.

It was claimed, on behalf of the Crown, that Matthew Herbert died possessed of no real estate within the County.

Defendant alleged that he "holdeth the Manors of Rothe tewxburie, Cogan, landoghe, Kibur &c., and the Scites of the late dissolved howse callid the graye ffryars of cardif, and certen messuages, burgages, half burgages, lands, Tents and hereditaments sett and beinge w[i]thin the liberties of the Towne of cardif afforesaid. And the mancion howse att coggan Pill. And the demaines vnto the same manc'on howse belongeinge or occupied w[i]th the same. And one medowe callid poole mede. And the ffree chappell of Rothe latelie dissolvid, w[i]th all tythes, p'fitts, lands and tents to the same chappell belongeinge or in any wise app'tein'ge [with other lands in North and South Wales.] And the Scite of the late dissoluid howse or priorie callid the blacke ffriars of the towne of cardif afforesaid." (The latter was purchased by Sir William Herbert from Sir George Herbert.) All the above properties were settled on the wife and issue of Sir William Herbert.

R.O. Exchequer Pleas. 2 Jac. I. 1604. Mich. Mems. 27, 28, 29. Latin.

[Translation.]

Catalogue: 2 Jac. I., S. Michael. Glamorgan, ss.

Plea by William, Earl of Pembroke, against Morgan Williams, concerning a plea of trespass on the case, for utterance of certain English words in derogation of the title of the aforesaid Earl to the town of Cardiff, granted by Edward the Sixth unto his predecessors. Issue was joined as to part of the words; as to the others, a demurrer in Law. On the demurrer in Law the Court gave damages to the Plaintiff. On the Plaintiff's issue of slander, a writ of Venire fac. directed to the Coroner ; afterwards returning for the Defendant, that the Plaintiff is liable for wrongful claim.

Plea Roll: Warrant of Attorney inrolled before the Barons of the Exchequer at Westminster, &c.

Glamorgan, to wit. William, Earl of Pembroke, debtor to our lord the King that now is, puts forward in his place William Hakewill, his Attorney, against Morgan Williams in a plea of trespass on the case.

Glamorgan, to wit. Morgan Williams puts forward in his place Robert Ball, his Attorney, against William, Earl of Pembroke, debtor of our Lord the King that now is, in a plea of trespass on the case.

Pleas before the Barons of the Exchequer at Westminster, at the pleas of the term of Saint Michael, in the year of the reign of the lord James, by the grace of God of England, Scotland, France and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth; namely, of England, France and Ireland, the second; of Scotland, the thirty eighth.

Glamorgan, to wit. Memorandum that in the term of Saint Michael in the first year of the reign of our lord James, now King of England, William, Earl of Pembroke, now comes before the Barons of the Exchequer of our said lord the King that now is, at the city of Winchester in the county of Southampton, by William Hakewill, his Attorney, and proffers then and there in Court a certain Bill against Morgan Williams, concerning a certain plea of trespass on the case ; of which Bill the tenour follows in these words, to wit: Glamorgan, to wit, William, Earl of Pembroke, debtor of our lord the King that now is, comes before the Barons of this Exchequer on the eighteenth day of November in this term, by William Hakewill, his Attorney, and complains by Bill against Morgan Williams, present here in Court on the same day, concerning a plea of trespass on the case ; for that, namely, whereas the lord Edward the Sixth, formerly King of England, was seised of the castle, manor, borough and town of Cardiff, with the appurtenances, in the county of Glamorgan, in his demesne as of fee, in right of his Crown of England ; and so thereof being seised, the said former King, by his Letters Patent sealed with his great seal of England, the date whereof is at Westminster in the county of Middlesex, on the seventh day of May in the fourth year of his reign, in consideration [etc., recital of Grant]. By pretext of which Letters Patent the aforesaid William Herbert, knight, was seised of the aforesaid castle, manor, borough, town and all other the premises aforesaid, with the appurtenances, in his demesne as of fee; and so thereof being seised, the aforesaid William Herbert, knight, was by the before-mentioned former King created Baron Herbert of Cardiff aforesaid in the said county of Glamorgan ; and shortly afterwards by the same former King the same William was created Earl of Pembroke. And afterwards the same Earl, by title of his estate, of and in the castle, manor, borough, town and other the premises aforesaid with the appurtenances, at Cardiff aforesaid in the said county of Glamorgan, died seised ; after whose death the castle, manor, borough and town and other the premises aforesaid, with the appurtenances, descended to one Henry, Earl of Pembroke, as son and heir of the aforesaid William, Earl of Pembroke; whereby the same Henry, Earl of Pembroke, into the same castle, manor, borough and town and other the premises, with the appurtenances, entered and was thereof seised in his demesne as of fee. And he so thereof being seised, afterwards, namely at the Great Session of the County of Glamorgan, held at Cowbridge in the said county of Glamorgan on the twentieth day of July in the twenty first year of the reign of the lady Elizabeth, late Queen of England, one Ambrose, late Earl of Warwick, Robert, late Earl of Leicester, and Henry Sidney, Knight of the most noble Order of the Garter, in the Court of the late Queen in her Great Session aforesaid for the County of Glamorgan aforesaid, held at Cowbridge aforesaid in the said county of Glamorgan, before William Leighton, esquire, deputy of William Gerrard, esquire, and Edward Walter, esquire, then Justices of our said lady the late Queen, there on Wednesday in the same Great Session, by the grant of that Court, recovered their seisin against the before-mentioned Henry, then Earl of Pembroke, then tenant of the free tenement of the castle, manor, borough, town and other the premises, with the appurtenances, amongst others, by the names of the castle, manor, borough and town of Cardiff, with the appurtenances, which the aforesaid late Earls of Warwick and Leicester, and the aforesaid Henry Sidney, knight, in the same Court of the said late Queen then claimed as their right, against the before mentioned late Earl of Pembroke, by Writ of Entry of the same late Queen, on disseisin in le post; which recovery was so premised and had to the use and intent following, namely : To the use of Mary, then Countess of Pembroke, for the term of her natural life, for and in consideration and for and in recompense of the title of her dower, or of the title of her dower as it ought or could accrue to her, of all and singular the manors, lordships, boroughs, castles, lands, tenements and hereditaments of the aforesaid Henry, late Earl of Pembroke, with the appurtenances; and after the decease of the same Countess, to the use of the same Henry, Earl of Pembroke, his heirs and assigns for ever; by pretence of which recovery, and by force of a certain Act concerning uses to be transferred into possession, in the Parliament of the lord King Henry the Eighth, at Westminster in the county of Middlesex, on the fourth day of February in the twenty seventh year of the reign of the said late King, held, published and provided, the aforesaid Henry, late Earl of Pembroke, and Mary his wife, seised of the castle, manor, borough, town and other the premises aforesaid, with the appurtenances, in their demesne as of fee, held for the term of the life of the aforesaid Countess, in the right of the same Countess, with reversion thereof, after her decease, unto the before-mentioned Henry, Earl of Pembroke, and his heirs for ever, regarding themselves; and so thereof being seised, with reversion thereof in form aforesaid, the same Henry afterwards, by title of his estate in the same, at Cardiff aforesaid in the county of Glamorgan aforesaid, of and in that reversion died seised; after whose death that reversion descended unto the said William, now Earl of Pembroke, as son and heir of the aforesaid Henry, late Earl of Pembroke; by reason whereof the said present Earl was and still is of that reversion seised as of fee. And being so by the same right so thereof seised, and the aforesaid Mary, Countess of Pembroke, being seised of the castle, manor, borough, town and other the premises aforesaid, with the appurtenances, in her demesne as of freehold, for the term of her life, in form aforesaid, the same Earl, on the first day of August in the fourty fourth year of the reign of the said late Queen Elizabeth, at Cardiff aforesaid, offered to bargain and sell his same reversion unto one Baptist Hicks, now knight; which Baptist then and there granted and agreed to pay for the same reversion five thousand pounds, to be paid unto the said present Earl within one year thence next ensuing, if the said reversion of the said present Earl of and in the castle, manor, borough, town and other the premises aforesaid, with the appurtenances, should be clearly discharged from every claim and title of any other person or persons in any manner to be made thereto. Nevertheless, the aforesaid Morgan, not being ignorant of the premises, falsely and maliciously intending to hinder the same present Earl from the sale of his aforesaid reversion for the true value of the same, and proposing maliciously, wickedly and unjustly to scandalise and bring into obloquy the right, estate and title of the said present Earl of and in that reversion, afterwards, namely on the twentieth day of August in the aforesaid fourty fourth year of the reign of the said late Queen, at Cardiff aforesaid, publicly and meaningly affirmed, said, asserted and published, in the presence of divers trustworthy subjects of the said late Queen who were then and there present, these false English words following, namely: The Towne of Cardiff (meaning the aforesaid town of Cardiff) is The Queenes Towne (meaning the said late Queen) and not the Earles nor Countesses of Pembroks (meaning the aforesaid present Earl and Countess) & Neyther of Them (meaning the said present Earl and Countess) have any right unto the Towne (meaning the said town of Cardiff) but only the queene (meaning the said late Queen) and neyther my lord nor lady of Pembrok (meaning the said present Earl and Countess) are lord or lady of the towhe & castle of Cardiff (meaning the said town and castle of Cardiff) but only Constables of the Castle (meaning the said castle of Cardiff) & neyther of them (meaning the said Earl and Countess) have any right to keepe any court there (meaning the said town of Cardiff) for that the Earl and Countesse (meaning the said Earl and Countess) have but one tenant in all the same towne (meaning the said town of Cardiff) and that all the rest of the tenants are the Queenes tenants (meaning the said late Queen) and that the burgage rents of the same towne (meaning the said town of Cardiff) are not my lords nor my ladyes (meaning the said Earl and Countess) but the Queenes (meaning the said late Queen); whereas in fact the same present Earl then was and still is seised of the reversion of the castle, manor, borough, town and other the premises, with their appurtenances, as of fee and right, and whereas in fact the said late Queen had no right, estate or title of or in the same castle, manor, borough and town and other the premises aforesaid, with the appurtenances, or of or in any part or parcel thereof, in manner and form as the aforesaid Morgan Williams falsely and maliciously asserted and published ; by pretext of which claim, saying, assertion and publication, which afterwards came to the hearing and notice of our said lady the late Queen and of the said Baptist Hicks, knight, and of several lieges of our said lady the late Queen, the before-mentioned Baptist Hicks refused to proceed in his aforesaid bargain to and with the before-mentioned Earl. And further, the same present Earl of Pembroke, for some time after the aforesaid twentieth day of August in the fourty fourth year aforesaid, could not and cannot yet sell or bargain his aforesaid reversion to any person, for a greater sum than for five hundred pounds at most, by reason of the said utterance and publication of the false English words aforesaid ; wherefore the same present Earl says that he is injured and has incurred loss to the value of five thousand pounds. By which the same present Earl is the less able to satisfy our lord the King that now is, for the debts which he owes unto our said lord the King, to his said Exchequer. And thereof he brings suit, &c.

And now here on this day, to wit, in the octave of Saint Michael in that same Term, until which day the aforesaid Morgan had licence to confer therof, and then to answer, here, to wit at Westminster in the county of Middlesex, came the parties aforesaid, namely the aforesaid present Earl by his Attorney aforesaid, as also the aforesaid Morgan by Robert Ball, his Attorney. And the aforesaid present Earl prays that the aforesaid Morgan answer to him in the premises. And hereupon the aforesaid Morgan by his Attorney aforesaid comes and defends &c. And as to the saying, assertion and publication of these English words following, in the narration aforesaid specified, namely: The Towne of Cardiff is the Queencs Towne and not the Earles nor Countesses of Pembrok And neyther of them have any right unto the towne but only the Queene And neyther my lord nor my lady of Pembrok are lord or lady of the towne, by the said Morgan above said and uttered, the said Morgan submits that the aforesaid present Earl ought not to have or maintain his aforesaid action thereof against him; protesting that the aforesaid present Earl, at the aforesaid time when the utterance of the aforesaid English words is supposed to have been made, was not seised of the reversion of the borough or town aforesaid, as the aforesaid Earl by his narration aforesaid above supposes; protesting also that the aforesaid present Earl of Pembroke did not offer for sale unto the before mentioned Baptist Hicks, now knight, or to any other, the reversion of and in the castle, manor, borough and town aforesaid and the other premises, with the appurtenances, or any of them; and that neither the aforesaid Baptist nor any other agreed to pay five thousand pounds for such reversion to the said Earl to be paid; and protesting also that the same Morgan did not know nor ever heard that the aforesaid present Earl offered or intended to sell the reversion of the aforesaid castle, manor, borough and town and other the premises, with the appurtenances, unto the before-mentioned Baptist Hicks or unto any other person or persons, as the aforesaid Earl by his narration aforesaid supposes. For a plea, the same Morgan says that the aforesaid town of Cardiff is an ancient town surrounded by stone walls, and contains, and at the aforesaid time when &c, as also at the time of the making of the aforesaid Letters Patent in the narration aforesaid specified, did contain in itself a hundred and forty messuages and two hundred gardens, and divers other lands, tenements and waste plots, in the separate tenures of divers persons; and that the aforesaid castle of Cardiff, at the aforesaid time when &c., was not a parcel of the said town, but lies and is without the walls of the town aforesaid and the liberties of the same; and that the said late Queen Elizabeth in her life, at the time when &c., was seised in her demesne as of fee in the right of her Crown of England, and, after the death of the said late Queen, the lord James, that now is King of England, was and still is seised of and in the liberties, jurisdictions and privileges of the aforesaid town of Cardiff, and of and in a hundred and thirty messuages in Cardif aforesaid, and of divers lands and tenements in Cardiff aforesaid, in the tenure and occupation of several inhabitants of the town of Cardiff aforesaid, of the yearly rental of thirty one pounds, fourteen shillings and three pence; and of several ancient rents and services called burgage rents, by which the rest of the burgages and messuages in the same town were then held of the said lady the Queen by several subjects of the said lady the Queen in her demesne as of fee, in the right of her Crown of England. And that the said Morgan, at the aforesaid time when &c., having a conversation with the aforesaid unknown man, concerning the right and title of the said late Queen to the town aforesaid, and concerning the rent aforesaid, and also concerning the right and title of the aforesaid Earl and Countess to the town aforesaid, at the town of Cardiff, without any malice or malicious intent to hinder the aforesaid Earl from the sale of his reversion of the castle aforesaid or of any of his tenements in the narration aforesaid specified, or to scandalise or bring into obloquy the right, estate or title of the said Earl therein, at the time when &c., asserted to the same unknown man and then and there published the English words in that plea above specified, to wit: The Towne of Cardiff is the Queens towne and not the Earles nor Countesses of Pembrok And neyther of them have any right unto the Towne but only the Queene And neyther my lord nor ladye of Pembrok are lord or ladye of the Towne of Cardiff; as he well might. Without that That the aforesaid late King Edward the Sixth, by his aforesaid Letters Patent, granted unto the same William Herbert, knight, the borough and town of Cardiff aforesaid, or one of them, and all and singular his messuages, cottages, houses, lands, tenements, gardens, possessions and hereditaments, with the appurtenances, in Cardiff aforesaid, to have unto the said William Herbert and his heirs, in manner and form as the said Earl in his above narration has alleged. And this he is prepared to prove; wherefore he prays judgment, namely as to whether the aforesaid Earl ought to have or maintain his action aforesaid therein against him, &c. And as to the saying, assertion and publication of the aforesaid other English words in the narration aforesaid specified, namely: neyther my lord nor ladye of Pembrok are lord or ladye of the Castle of Cardiff but only Constables of the Castle, by him the said Morgan above supposed to have been uttered, the same Morgan says that he is in nothing thereof guilty. And hereof he puts himself on his country. And the aforesaid present Earl is silent. And as to the aforesaid other remaining English words by the same Morgan above supposed to have been uttered, namely: And neyther of them have any right to keepe any Court there, for that the Earle and Countesse have but one tenaunt in the same towne and that all the rest of the tenaunts are the Queenes tenaunts And that the burgage rents of the same towne are not my lordes nor my ladyes but the Queenes, he the said Morgan says that the aforesaid Earl ought not to have or maintain his aforesaid action thereof against him, because he says that well and true it is that the aforesaid Countess of Pembrok, at the aforesaid time when &c., was seised in her demesne as of freehold, for the term of her life, of and in the aforesaid castle of Cardiff; which castle, before the making of the Letters Patent aforesaid, was once parcel of the possessions of the aforesaid Jasper, formerly Duke of Bedford, and afterwards of the said late King Edward the Sixth; and also that the same Countess, at the time when, &c., was likewise seised of and in a certain manor called Rothe Dogfeld, within the parish of Saint Mary in Cardiff aforesaid, and situate and lying outside the walls of the aforesaid town of Cardiff, in the suburbs of the town aforesaid; and of and in one messuage, one cottage and one garden, with the appurtenances, in Cardiff aforesaid, inside the walls of the town aforesaid, which formerly belonged to William Bawdripp, knight, formerly, and at the said time when &c., of the said late Queen held in burgage, and then, namely at the aforesaid time when &c., in the tenure of one Henry Morgan Lewis: of and for which messuage a certain rent called a burgage rent, of six pence, was accustomed to be paid unto the said late Queen; and at the said time when &c., he owed, and of no other messuage or tenement within the walls of the town aforesaid; as also of and in one other messuage, with the appurtenances, in Cardiff aforesaid, lying without the walls of the town and borough aforesaid, in the suburbs of the same town, which late also belonged to the aforesaid William Bawdripp, with the reversion of the aforesaid castle, and of the manor aforesaid, and of the aforesaid two messuages, to the before-mentioned William, Earl of Pembroke, and his heirs; and that neither the aforesaid Countess, at the aforesaid time when &c., was, nor were the aforesaid present Earl and Countess, at the aforesaid time when &c., seised of the aforesaid town of Cardiff, nor of any other messuage or messuages or tenement within the town of Cardiff aforesaid; nor had they, nor had either of them, any other tenant within the town aforesaid, in possession or reversion. Wherefore he the said Morgan, at the aforesaid time when &c., having conversation with the aforesaid unknown man, concerning a certain Court of the said late Queen of record held within the town aforesaid before the Bailiffs of the town aforesaid, and concerning divers rents of assise, and other revenues of the said late Queen, of the burgages and other tenements within the town aforesaid, without malice or malicious intent to hinder the same Earl from the sale of his reversion of any of his tenements in the aforesaid narration specified, or to scandalise or bring into obloquy the right, estate and title of the same Earl of or in the reversion of those his tenements or of any parcel thereof, at the aforesaid time when &c., said, asserted and published the remainder of the aforesaid English words, namely: and neither of them have any right to kecpe any Court there for that the Earle and Countesse have but one tenaunt in the same towne and that all the rest of the tenaunts are the Queenes tenaunts And that the burgage rents of the same towne are not my lords nor my ladies but the Queenes, as well he might; and this he is prepared to prove; wherefore he prays judgment, whether the aforesaid present Earl should have or maintain his aforesaid action thereof against him &c.

And the aforesaid present Earl, as to the plea of the aforesaid Morgan as to the saying, assertion and publication of these English words following, in the narration of the same present Earl specified, to wit; the towne of Cardiff is the Queenes towne & not the Earles nor Countesses of Pembroks and neyther of them have any right unto the towne but only the Queen And neither my lord nor my lady of Pembrok are lord or lady of the towne, by the same Morgan said and uttered, above pleaded in bar, says that that plea, and the matter in the same contained, are not sufficient in Law to preclude the said present Earl from having his aforesaid action against him thereof, and that to that plea, pleaded in manner and form aforesaid, he needs not and is not bound by the Law of the land to answer; and this he is prepared to prove. Wherefore, for the want of a sufficient plea of the said Morgan in bar, the said present Earl prays that judgment and his damages by reason of the saying, assertion and publication of the before-mentioned English words last recited may be given him, &c. And, for a cause of his demurrer in Law, according to the form of Statute in such case made and provided, the same present Earl to the Court here shows the causes following, namely: For that, whereas the aforesaid present Earl in his narration aforesaid derives his title to the town and borough of Cardiff aforesaid, the aforesaid Morgan in his induction to his traverse, in his plea aforesaid contained, only shews that the aforesaid late Queen Elizabeth in her lifetime, at the same time when, &c., was seised in her demesne as of fee, in right of her Crown of England; and after the death of the same late Queen the said lord James, now King of England, was and still is seised of and in the liberties, jurisdictions and privileges of the aforesaid town of Cardiff, and of and in one hundred and thirty messuages in Cardiff aforesaid, and of divers lands and tenements in Cardiff aforesaid, in the tenure and occupation of several inhabitants of the town of Cardiff aforesaid, at an annual rent of thirty one pounds, fourteen shillings and three pence; and of several ancient rents called burgage rents, by which the rest of the burgages and messuages in the same town were then held of our lady the said late Queen, by several subjects of the said late Queen in her demesne as of fee, in right of her Crown of England; and does not allege that our said lady the late Queen in her lifetime, at the aforesaid time when &c., and the aforesaid lord James, the King that now is, after the death of the said late Queen, were seised of the town and borough aforesaid, as he, in his induction to the traverse aforesaid, ought to have alleged; and also for that the traverse aforesaid contains in it more than a justification of the said Morgan to those words, and more than in the narration of the said Earl is alleged; and for that the induction to the traverse aforesaid is insufficient; and for that the aforesaid Morgan makes traverse on matter which is not traversable; and also for that the plea of the aforesaid Morgan to the words aforesaid extends only to the general issue. And as to the plea of the aforesaid Morgan to the aforesaid other English words, namely: and neyther of them have any right to keepe any court there for that the Earle and Countesse have but one tenaunt in the same towne and that all the rest of the tenaunts are the Queenes tenaunts and that the burgage rents of the same towne are not my lord nor my ladyes but the Queenes, above pleaded in bar, the said Earl likewise says that that plea and the matter therein contained are not sufficient in Law to preclude him the said present Earl from having his action aforesaid thereof against him, and that he need not and is not bound by the Law of the land to answer to that plea in manner and form aforesaid pleaded; and this he is prepared to prove; Wherefore, for want of a sufficient plea of the aforesaid Morgan in this respect, he the said present Earl prays that judgment and his damages may be given him by reason of the saying, assertion and publication of the aforesaid English words last recited, &c. And for the causes of his demurrer in the Law thereupon, according to the Statute in that case made and provided, the said present Earl unto the Court here shows the cause following; namely, for that that plea extends only to the general issue, and is repugnant in itself.

And the aforesaid Morgan, as to the plea of the same Morgan to the saying, assertion and publication of the aforesaid English words, namely: the towne of Cardiff is the Queenes towne & not the Earles nor Countesses of Pembrok and neyther of them have any right unto the towne but only the Queene, and neyther my lord nor lady of Pembrok are lord or lady of the towne, by him the said Morgan above supposed to have been said and uttered, above pleaded in bar, from which he in that plea above alleged that he had sufficient matter in Law to preclude the aforesaid present Earl from his action thereof against him the said Morgan : which he is prepared to prove; which matter the aforesaid present Earl doth not gainsay, nor answer in anywise thereto, but always refuses to admit that proof; as before, he prayeth judgment and that the aforesaid present Earl be precluded from having his action aforesaid thereof against him the said Morgan. And as to the aforesaid plea of the said Morgan to the saying, assertion and publication of the aforesaid English words, namely : and neyther of them have any right to keepe any Court there, for that the Earle & Countesse have but one tenaunt in the same towne and that all the rest of the tenaunts are the Queenes tenaunts and that the burgage rents of the same towne are not my lords nor my ladyes but the Queenes, above pleaded in bar, from which he alleged above that he had in that plea sufficient matter in Law for precluding the aforesaid present Earl from his action thereof against the same Morgan : which he is prepared to prove; which matter the aforesaid present Earl doth not gainsay, nor answer in anywise thereto, but always refuses to admit that proof; as before, he prayeth judgment and that the aforesaid present Earl be precluded from having his action aforesaid thereof against him the said Morgan, &c.

And because the Barons here wish to advise of and upon the premises whereof the parties aforesaid have above put themselves in the judgment of the Court, before giving judgment therein, a day is given to the parties aforesaid here, &c., until the octave of Saint Hilary, for hearing their judgment therein, for that the same Barons here are not yet thereof, &c. And as to the trying of the issue aforesaid above joined to be tried by the country, because that issue between the parties aforesaid of and upon the premises above joined ought to be tried by men of the English county next adjacent to the aforesaid county of Glamorgan, and not elsewhere; and for that the County of Hereford is the English county next adjacent to the aforesaid county of Glamorgan; therefore the Sheriff of Herefordshire aforesaid is instructed to cause to come hither, at the before-mentioned term, 12 &c. of the vicinage of his county aforesaid nearest adjacent to the vicinage of Cardiff in the aforesaid county of Glamorgan; of whom whichever, &c., by whom, &c.; and whereas neither, &c., to recognisances, &c. And the same day is given to the parties aforesaid here, &c. On which day hither came as well the aforesaid present Earl as the aforesaid Morgan, by their Attorneys aforesaid. And because the Barons here will further advise [other successive adjournments, worded nearly as above, through several terms.] On which day hither came as well the aforesaid present Earl as the aforesaid Morgan, by their Attorneys aforesaid. And hereupon, after seeing the premises concerning which the parties aforesaid put themselves in the judgment of the Court aforesaid, and by the Barons here full intelligence being thereof had, with fuller deliberation between them as to the aforesaid plea of the aforesaid Morgan as to the saying, assertion and publication of the aforesaid English words in the narration of the said present Earl specified, namely: the towne of Cardiff is the Queenes towne and not the Earles nor Countesses of Pembrok and neither of them have any right to the towne but onlie the Queene and neither my lord nor lady of Pembrok are lord or lady of the towne of Cardiff, by the said Morgan said and uttered, above pleaded in bar, it seems to the same Barons here that that plea in manner and form aforesaid pleaded is not sufficient in Law to preclude the before-mentioned present Earl from having his action aforesaid in that behalf against the aforesaid Morgan. Wherefore the aforesaid present Earl ought to recover his damages against the beforementioned Morgan, by reason of the saying, assertion and utterance of the aforesaid scandalous English words last mentioned. But because it is not known whether the aforesaid Morgan will be convicted of the saying, assertion and utterance of the rest of the aforesaid scandalous English words in the narration aforesaid above specified, or no; and agreeing therefore that there should be made one only taxation of damages for the aforesaid entire saying, assertion and utterance of the aforesaid scandalous English words in the narration aforesaid above specified, if it happen that the aforesaid Morgan is convicted of the saying, assertion and utterance of the rest of the aforesaid scandalous English words in the narration aforesaid above specified, besides as to the inquiring concerning damages for defamation thereof, so far as the issue aforesaid between the parties aforesaid above joined for trial by the country is terminated. And because the Barons here will further advise [more adjournments.] And hereupon the aforesaid William, now Earl of Pembroke, says that one James Tomkyns, esquire, is now Sheriff of the aforesaid County of Hereford; and that the said present Earl is of affinity to the aforesaid James Tomkyns, for that the said James took to wife a certain Ann Gates, daughter of Jane, Lady Gates, who was daughter of Mary Vaughan, daughter of Richard Herbert, esquire, the father of William, formerly Earl of Pembroke, who was the father of Henry, the late Earl of Pembroke, the father of the aforesaid William, now Earl of Pembroke; which said Ann is still surviving and lives at Hereford in the said county of Hereford. And for that reason the said present Earl prays a Writ of Venire facias of our said lord the King, that the twelve hither, &c., to try the issue aforesaid joined to be tried by the country, unto the Coroners of the same County of Hereford to be directed. And because the aforesaid Morgan does not gainsay this, therefore, as to the issue aforesaid, above joined to be tried by the country, the Coroner in the said County of Hereford is instructed to cause to come hither, on the day of the Holy Trinity, in three weeks next to come, twelve &c. of the vicinage of the same county of Hereford next adjacent to the vicinage of Cardiff aforesaid in the said county of Glamorgan, to recognisances in form aforesaid, &c. . . . . . The Coroners in the said County of Hereford, namely John Grene and James Brace, sent hither by Writ of Venire facias, the Jurors aforesaid of the vicinage of Ewiaslacy in the said county of Hereford, which is the vicinage of the said county of Hereford nearest adjacent to the vicinage of Cardiff aforesaid in the said county of Glamorgan, together with a panel of the names of the Jurors, to the same Writ annexed. And those the Jury being called came not. Therefore the same Coroners are instructed to distrain the Jury aforesaid by lands, so &c. in the aforesaid octaves of Saint Michael next to be; the Justices of our said Lord the King, at the Assizes appointed to be held in the County of Hereford, by form of the Statute thereof, first, on Monday the twenty seventh day of July next at Hereford in the said county of Hereford first should come; so that inquisition thereof might distinctly and aptly be taken, here, on the aforesaid octaves of Saint Michael. And it was told to the parties aforesaid that they should attend before the before-mentioned Justices of our said lord the King, at the Assizes aforesaid, on the aforesaid Monday; and that they be present on the aforesaid octave of Saint Michael, to hear their judgment thereof, upon the oath of inquisition aforesaid, whether &c. On which day hither came the parties aforesaid, namely, as well the aforesaid present Earl by the aforesaid Abraham Baylie, his Attorney, as the aforesaid Morgan by Robert Ball, his Attorney aforesaid. And the Justices of our said lord the King at the Assizes, before whom, &c., deliberated here upon the tenour of this plea, together with the Writ of Distringas of the Jury aforesaid, with the panel of the names of the Jury, annexed to that Writ, and conformable to that tenour; which tenour is indorsed so.

Afterwards, on the day and at the place within contained, before Christopher Yelverton, knight, one of the Justices of our Lord the King appointed for holding pleas before the said King, and David Williams, knight, another Justice of our said lord the King, appointed for holding pleas before the said King, Justices of our said lord the King appointed for holding Assizes in the County of Hereford, by form of the Statute &c., come as well the within-named William, Earl of Pembroke by his Attorney within named, as the within-written Morgan Williams, in their own persons. And the Jury, of whom mention is within made, having been empanelled, certain of them, namely Howell Lewis, John de Clodock, Nicholas Gilbert of Llanweyno, gentleman, William Powell of Michell Churche Estlye, Saunder Wynston of Walterston, Rice Watkyn of Roulston, Thomas Birte of Sutton, Thomas Carwardyn of Stretton, Roland Eccley of Wormsley, Stephen Greenely of Staunton on Arrowe, and John Kynford of Cannon Pewne, come and are sworn in that Jury. And a certain Juror of that Jury, namely William John Lewis of Clodock, gentleman, likewise comes. And for that he is found suspect between the parties aforesaid, he is at once taken out of that panel. And because the rest of the Jurymen of that Jury have not appeared, therefore others of the bystanders are by the Coroners of the County aforesaid chosen at the requisition of the before-mentioned William, and by command of the Judges aforesaid are anew submitted, whose names are added to the within-written panel according to the form of the Statute in that case made and provided. And the Jurors so anew arraigned, namely Hugh Pantwall and Thomas Hoskyns, came and were sworn in the Jury aforesaid together with the other Jurors aforesaid first impanelled; who being chosen, tried and sworn to tell the truth concerning the matter within contained, say upon their oath, as to the saying, assertion and publication of the withinwritten English words in the within-written narration specified, namely: neyther my lord nor ladye of Pembrok are lord or lady of the Castle of Cardiff but only Constables of the same, that the said Morgan Williams is not guilty of anything thereof, as the same Morgan alleged in his pleading thereof. Therefore, as to the saying, assertion and publication of the aforesaid English words, namely: neither my lord nor ladye of Pembrok are lord or lady of the Castle of Cardiff, but only constables of the same, of the aforesaid English words in the narration aforesaid above specified, whereof the aforesaid Morgan Williams is by the aforesaid Jurors above acquitted, the aforesaid William, Earl of Pembroke, be thereof liable for his wrongful claim therein against the same Morgan; and that the said Morgan go thence without a day, &c. And thereupon, as to the saying, assertion and publication of the aforesaid English words, namely: and neither of them have any right to keep any court there for that the Earle and Countysse have but one tenaunt in the same towne and that all the rest of the tenaunts are the Queenes tenaunts and that the burgage rents of the same towne are not my lords nor my ladys but the Queenes, of the aforesaid English words in the narration aforesaid above specified, and whereof the parties aforesaid have put themselves in the judgment of the Court here, and whereof the same Court here is not yet advised, the said William, now Earl of Pembroke, confesses that he will not proceed against the before-mentioned Morgan further therein, &c. Therefore the said Morgan shall go thereof without a day, &c. And as to the saying, assertion and publication of the aforesaid other English words, namely : the towne of Cardiff is the Queenes towne and not the Earles nor Countesses of Pembr. and neyther of them have any right to the towne but only the Queene and neyther my lord nor lady of Pembrok are lord or lady of the towne of Cardiff, of the rest of the aforesaid English words in the narration aforesaid above specified, the said William, now Earl of Pembroke, prays a Writ of our lord the King De inquirendo de dampnis therefor, and it is granted him, &c. Therefore the Sheriff of Glamorgan is instructed to inquire diligently, by the oath of upright and loyal men of his bailiwick, what damages the said Earl of Pembroke has sustained, as well by reason of the saying, assertion and utterance of the aforesaid English words here last specified, as by the charges and costs incurred by him about his suit in this behalf. And inquisition which, &c., the Sheriff cause to be stated to the before-mentioned Barons here, on Saint Hilary's day within 15 days next to be, under his seal and the seals, &c. And the same day is given unto the before-mentioned William, Earl of Pembroke, here, &c.

R.O. Exchequer Special Commission. 5. Eliz. 1563. 7048.

The Inuentorie of alle the goodes and cattalls of the Reu'end ffather in god Anthony Busshop of llandaff deceassyd preysed made and taken by Robert cooke, Richard Pratt, Philyp lawrence and Watkyn lawrence of the p'ryshe of matherne the Second daye of November anno d'ni mill'mo quingentesimo sexagesimo tercio.

[In the parlour were] two payre of almayne Ryvetts, iij bylles, a long pyke, iij bowes & iij sheffe of arrowes.

In my lordes studye: an olde cope of blew redd & grene satten.

My lordes apparell: an olde long gowne of black Satten faced with caphew, an olde chymmer of worsted. Item ij olde cappes and an olde sylke hatt.

[The kitchen was exceedingly well furnished.]

R.O. Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 7 Jac. I. 1609. Mich 13. Monm.

Riot at Rumney.

Taken at Newport Town Hall before (inter alios) Thomas Hughes, gent:

Morgan John Harry versus William Price, esq. & Thomas Powell, gent.

Defendants being Sheriffs of the County of Monmouth, did by their officers "drive awaie foure oxen of the plaintiffe depasturinge upon sixe acres of Landes w[hi]ch the plaintiffe held by the demise of Edward Roberts w[i]thin the Lordshipp of Rumpney."

It was alleged that "the said Mannor of Rumney is more disordered then any other places of the said county of Monmoth & that the shreife or other officers of the kings Ma[jes]tie dare not execute processes or leuie the kings mats debts due upon the tennaunts and inhabitaunts of the said Lordshipp."

It was further alleged that "the inhabitants of the hundred of Wenllooge wherin the said Lordshippe of Rumney lyeth are very disord'ly p'sons and that many of the said inhabitants haue committed diuers misdemeanours affrayes Rescuons and out Rages upon diuers shriffes in that Hundred."

The said Thomas Powell being undershrive of the county of Monmoth having arested certeine p'sons as well upon execuc'ons capias utlagat' and other pro'sses at the Towne of Newport, the said p'sons so arested were very violently and in most ryotous sorte taken away by the inhabitants of the hundred of Wenllooge from the said shrive and his officers as he was going with them to the kings Mats Gaile, and did assaulte and put the said shriffe in danger of life.

The greatest p'te of the Lordship of Romney is occupied and held by gent. and others that dwells and inhabits out of the said Lordship and that be not dwellers or resyants within the said Lordshipp of Romney.

R.O. Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 8 Jac. I. 1610. Mich. 11. Mon. and Glam.

Thomas Hall versus Thomas Abrahall &c.

At Newport.

Right to (inter alia) the Chapel of Rumney.

The chapel of Rumney was part of the possessions late belonging to certain chantries at Newport. Rumney Chantry was granted by Edw. VI. to William Herbert.

R.O. Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 8 Jac. I. 1610. Mich. 21. Mon. and Glam.

Thomas Hall gent. versus Walter Herbert &c.

At Newport.

Henry Dunn was seised in his demesne as of fee, according to the custom of the Manor of Mallocks Hold, of and in a dwellinghouse, barn, bakehouse and 23 acres of customary lands of "Inground," and 4 acres of lands of "wharffe,"being customary lands, parcel of the said Manor of Mallocks Hold; William Morgan, esq., Steward.

The custom of the said Manor is that every tenant holding lands within the same, upon any alienation or surrender made there by one tenant to another, he to whom the lands passeth is to pay to the Lord of the Manor for every acre of the said Inground 2s. the acre.

"At the greate fludde & Invndac'on of the Sea in those partes The said howse of the said John Dunne was broaken by force of the said Sea; and at that instant the cupboordes chests and coffers of the said John Dunne wherein the Evidences writinges and copies of Court Rolles of his were, w[hi]ch concerned the premises, were caryed away by the said fludd."

Another custom of the said Manor is : "That the landes houlden w[i]thin the said Mannor is & ought to com by Inheritance to the youngest Sonne of the first wiffe And in default thereof to the yongest Sonne of the second wiffe And in default of such yssue male, then to the yongest daughter and in default of such yssue then it descendes to the next of kynne of the owner thereof."

The King was Lord of the Manor of Mallocks Hold. Henry Thomas, of Cardiff, gentleman, was a customary tenant there.

The lands and tenements, or customary free lands, used to be granted and rateably allowed to the tenants by the Lord of the said Manor or his Steward, by the rod, according to the custom of the said Manor, for and to them and their heirs for ever.

All or part of the Manor of Mallocks Hold lay in the parish of Rumney. Part thereof belonged to certain chapels and chantries. Forty acres of chantry lands in this parish was leased by King Edward VI. (Probably the lands in Rumney belonged to the chapel of Rumney.)

Mention is made of a manor called Rogerston, alias Trevgwillim, in the parish of Bassalleg, Monmouthshire.

Another custom of the Manor of Mallocks Hold is that, if any person hath any estate of inheritance to any customaryhold lands parcel of the said manor, that after his decease his wife shall and may have, hold and enjoy such his customary lands for and during her widow estate.

Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 9 Jac. I. 1610–11. East. 20. Mon. & Glam.

Same matter.

The above manor is described as forty acres of land and seven "cou'eies" [coveries] called Mallocks hold in the parish of Rompney.

Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 9 Jac. I. 1610—11. East. 23. Mon. & Glam.

Same matter.

The chantry or free chapel of Rumney.

A house and garden at Newport paid a rent of 1lb. of wax towards maintaining light and lamp for a chantry priest.

Sixteen acres of "warth" in Mallocks Hold were in the hands of Edward Kemys.

R.O. Exchequer Depositions by Commission. 9 Jac. I. 1611. Mich. 18. Monm. & Glam.

Customs on wine at Cardiff.Charles Somerset & Valentine Prichard versus John Robourough & William James.
And versus Peter Samyne, William Wells, John Mynyffee and others.

Edward Jordan, of Cardiff, gentleman, Comptroller of the Port of Cardiff, saith: The barque Peter, of Cardiff, arrived in the port town of Cardiff in February 1607, "and there brake Bulke and entred in the customehowse there xiiij tonnes and A halfe of wynes called sacks brought from beyond the seas, and there paid all dueties due for Tonnage thereof, And in the name of William Wells marchant was entred in the customehowse there six tonnes of sacke brought by him in the said Barque from beyond the seas" Also other wines in the names of Peter Samyne &c.

The barque John, of Cardiff, arrived there in April 1610, also loaded with "sacks" from beyond the seas.

In 1608 the ship Ann, of Cardiff, brought a like cargo of Spanish wines from Cadiz, and landed it at Cogan Pill. Jarvis Tanner, of Cardiff, was master of her. All the wines brought by the above vessels were from Spain.