Glamorgan Calendar Rolls and Gaol Files
1738-64

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

John Hobson Matthews (editor)

Year published

1900

Pages

199-217

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'Glamorgan Calendar Rolls and Gaol Files: 1738-64', Cardiff Records: volume 2 (1900), pp. 199-217. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=48123 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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1738–64

1738.

Glamorgan ss. The Presentment of the Grand Jury of our Sovereign Lord the at the Great Sessions of the said County Held at Cardiffe in the said County on Saturday the seventh day of Aprill in the Twelv'th year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Second by the Grace of God King of Great Brittain and soeforth before Richard Carter and Henry Proctor Justices there.

The Jurors on their Oaths Present That the Room in the Common Gaol for the County aforesaid in the Town of Cardiffe aforesaid w[hi]ch hath usually been the Place for the Confinement of Criminals is Insufficient for detaining such Prisoners That there is another Room in the said Gaol commonly known by the name of the Brewhouse w[hi]ch is a more Convenient Place for that Purpose but that the same is out of Repair And that the same ought to be repair'd at the Expence of the said County.

Tho: Popkin
Rowland Dawkin
Robtt Popkins
Jon Llewellyn
Rob. Knight
M. Pryce
Lewis Price
Thomas Powell
William Prichard
Walter Powell
John Lucas
Rees Thomas
William Seys
Wm Bennett Junr
John Mathews
John Thomas

Inquest taken 29 August 1738, at the house of Evan Jones in the town of Llantrissent, before Evan Prichard, esq., Coroner, upon view of the body of William James, late of the parish of Coychurch, collier, then lying dead, found that the deceased going down by a certain rope into a certain coal pit of Katherine Evan and Margaret Phillip, of Llantrissent, widows, called Brun Cradock, in the parish of Llantrissent, it so happened that the damp being then in the said coal pit, suffocated the said William James; by which damp the said William James instantly died.

1740.

Thomas Harris, labourer, confessed to burglariously stealing a gold broad piece, a gold quarter-guinea, and some coppers, from the dwellinghouse of Mary Jenkins at Cardiff. He had confessed the theft to his relative, Edward Harris, of Monmouth, barber, who restored the money to its owner. Edward Harris and Priscilla his wife were bound over before Thomas Middleton, Mayor of Monmouth, to give evidence.

1741.

"An Account or Schedule of the whole Estate debts Creditts and Effects of John Evan now a Prisoner in His Ma'ty's Gaol for the County of Glamorgan at the Suit of David Howell and Catherine his wife for twenty nine pounds Sixteen shillings and eight pence damages.

A debt of two pounds sixteen Shillings and Nine pence due to me by Note of Hand from John Thomas of the parish of Llantrissant in this County and Morgan Thomas of Aberdare in this County Labourers bearing date the first day of August 1729. Wittnesses to the same: Henry Treharne, Thomas Evan.

A debt of Nine Shillings and Six pence due from Evan Edward John of the parish of Radir in this County being the Remr of a Sum of Money due to me for sheep sold to him. Wittness to the same: Mary Morgan.

A debt of two pounds Eleven Shillings due to me from David Morgan Esqr Wittnesses to the same: Mary Morgan, Willm Jenkins.

One old Welsh bible.

The whole duty of Man in Welsh. (fn. 1)

And a book in Welsh intituled The divine Poems of Mr. Rees Prichard. (fn. 2)

John Euan."

1744.

Inquest taken 30 August 18 G. 2., at the house of Rees Howell at Roath in the Hundred of Kibbor and County of Glamorgan, before Evan Prichard, esq., Coroner, upon view of the body of Edward Richard, labourer, found that the deceased, as he was going from the dwelling-house of Thomas Brewer in the parish of Lanishen to to his own dwelling-house in the parish of Lanedern, fell into a well called ffunnon Vedw in the said parish of Lanedern and was drowned.

Inquest taken at the Guildhall in Cardiff, before the Bailiffs of the said town. upon view of the body of James William late of the parish of Little Bettus in the county of Carmarthen, labourer, found that the deceased was drowned when washing in the river Taff at Cardiff, on Sunday morning.

March 1745.

[N.B.—All documents are now in English.]

Thomas Van was indicted for stealing boards from the floors of the Whitefriars, Cardiff, to build a slope-house in the town.

David Edwards, fording the Taff on horseback at Rhydylwad, on the way from Caerphilly to his home in Radyr parish, was torn from his horse by a flood and drowned.

Glamorgan to wit. The Jurors for our Sovereign Lord the King upon their Oath present that David Jones late of the parish of Llanvihangel y Vedw in the County of Glamorgan Labourer not having the ffear of God before his Eyes but being moved and Seduced by the Instigation of the Devil and not Regarding his Duty and Allegiance to our Sovereign Lord George the Second now King of Great Britain and so forth on the one and thirtyeth day of December on the nineteenth Year of the reign of our Said Lord the now King at the parish of Lanedern in the said County maliciously and Seditiously and with a loud Voice did utter and Speak publish pronounce and say in the hearing and presence of many of the Liege Subjects of our said Lord the King the Treasonable and Seditious words ffollowing that is to say) Make Room for King James's man (meaning that he he said David Jones was a Servant to James who is stiled and Commonly Called the Pretender to the Crown of our said Sovereign Lord King George the Second) And that he the said David Jones did afterwards (to wit) on the day and year aforesaid at Lanedern aforesaid in the County aforesaid maliciously and Seditiously with a Loud Voice utter speak publish pronounce and say other Treasonable and Seditious words (that is to say) God save King James (meaning the said James the Pretender) with Intent to Seduce the Liege Subjects of our said Sovereign Lord King George from their allegiance towards our said Lord the King to the Interest and Service of the said James the Pretender To the Evil Example of all others in the like Case offending and against the Peace of our said Lord the King his Crown and Dignity.

Morgan.

pleads guilty.

August 1746.

Coroner's Inquest found that Thomas James, aged ten years, late of Ystradowen, was accidentally killed by a wheel in the mill there.

Also that Thomas Price, mariner, was accidentally drowned while swimming in the river Taff near "Cardiff Key."

1747.

Coroner's Inquest taken at the house of John James at Landaff in the Hundred of Kibbor and County of Glamorgan, upon view of the body of Morgan Thomas late of the Parish of Landaff aforesaid, labourer, found that the deceased was undermining a pine end of a certain house in a field called Kaer ffirad (fn. 3) in the parish of Landaff, when the said pine end fell suddenly on him and crushed him to death.

A Pembrokeshire cattle-stealer was said (as an evidence of his bad character) to have offered twenty shillings to a servant of Mr. Edmond Thomas of Saint Mellon's, "to see him have fair play at next Whitchurch revell at Cards."

1748.

At the April Sessions a somewhat rare form of legal procedure occurred at Cardiff, and we find a paper headed "Names of the Jury of Matrons between our Lord the King and Catherine Llewelin singlewoman to Inquire whether she be quick with Child or not." Twelve matrons (wives and widows of tradesmen) were sworn, including Catherine, the wife of Michael Brewer, perukemaker; "Margarett the wife of Thomas Mossip of the 5 Bells," and "Frances Lewis, Hall keepers wife." After the list of names comes the record: "The Jury find that Catherin is quick with child." Execution of the sentence of death was thereupon postponed until after the child's birth. Such is the Law's careful guardianship of an innocent human existence. The prisoner had stolen money and clothes at Llangynwyd.

Coroner's Inquest taken at the Guildhall of Cardiff, on view of the body of Griffith Thomas late of Landaffe, labourer, found that, "having lain himself down to sleep on the Verge of a certain LimeKiln near Blunts Gate in the said Town of Cardiff, he accidentally fell into the said lime kiln then burning, whereby the said Griffith Thomas was suffocated."

1749.

Glamorganshire. Dinas Powis Hundred. Coroner's Inquest holden 26 June, on view of the body of James Okey, late of St. Andrew's, labourer, found that the deceased "went a fishing to the River Ely dividing the Parishes of Landoch juxta Pennarth in the Hundred and County aforesaid, and being so fishing in the sd River the Tide from the River Severn coming in into the said River Ely where the sd James Okey was then fishing, overtook the sd James Okey and drew him into the sd River Ely, where he the sd James Okey was then and there drowned by the sd Water in the sd River Ely."

"Glamorgan to wit. To the Honourable his Majesty's Justices of the Court of Grand Sessions for the Several County's of Glamorgan Brecon and Radnor.

We Arthur Williams and George Watkins Esquires two of his Majesty's Justices of the peace for the Town of Cardiffe in the said County of Glamorgan Do Humbly Certifye unto your Lordshipps that we Have viewed the Causeway in the common Highway in the parish of St John the Baptist leading from the gate of a certain close called Cae'r Vid, vol, to a certain place called Cat Hays which stands presented in this Court to be ruinous and out of repair and the Cart road or highway on the Eastern Side of the said causeway which stands presented to be in a ruinous and dangerous Condition And also the Cartway or common Highway on a certain place called the Black wears in the said parish of St John aforesaid leading from the said Town of Cardiffe to Cae'rphilly in the said County to be in decay for want of repair and amendment and not of Sufficient Breadth according to act of Parliament Have been severally sufficiently repaired and amended and made of sufficient Breadth according to act of Parliament By the Inhabitants of the said parish of St John aforesaid So that his Majesty's Subjects may safely pass and repass over the same with their horses and carriages Witness our hands and Seals this twenty third day of August one Thousand Seven Hundred and forty nine.

Arthur Williams [L.S.]

George Watkins [L.S.]

Note.—The above seals, in red wax, are impressed with these arms:—Per pale. I. Three lioncels rampant; on a chief a bordure indented. II. A chevron between three Saxon's heads couped. The arms on the dexter side are those of a junior branch of Herbert; those on the sinister were borne by Watkins of Court Robert The seal would seem to have been made for the joint use of these two Bailiffs, and, if authoritative, the arms possess genealogical interest.

1750.

Glamorganshire. Kibbor Hundred. Coroner's Inquest taken 28 March in the dwellinghouse of Morgan Mathew, of the parish of Lanishen in the said County, innkeeper, on view of the body of William Llewelyn, found that the deceased, on the 6th day of December last, went into a certain field called Dwy Erw Coed, in the parish of Roath, and having made a fire in a hollow oak, the burnt tree fell and crushed him.

Cardiff Town. Coroner's Inquest on view of the body of Christian Lewis, late of the parish of Saint John Baptist in the said town, widow, found that the deceased met her death by falling into the privy at the King David, in the said town of Cardiff.

Cardiff Town. Coroner's Inquest taken 30 August, on view of the body of Robert Tanner, late of Cardiff, an infant, found that the deceased, on or about the 11th April last, being at a certain place adjoining to the river Taff, called the Gollyate, otherwise Gollgate, in the said town, accidentally fell into the said river and was suffocated. [The Bailiffs, Edmund Lloyd and John Okey, seal with the beforementioned seal of the former Bailiffs, Arthur Williams and George Watkins. One seal in this instance stands for both signatories.]

William Lewis, Bailiff of Kibbor, and his colleagues of the Hundreds of Dinaspowis, Caerphilly, Miskin and Cowbridge, have the word "fined" set against their names on the Roll of Officers.

1751.

From the Deposition of a witness in an unimportant case, we incidentally learn that there was a "sawpit in the Castle Court of Cardiff."

1752.

Cardiff Town. Coroner's Inquest taken 4 August 1752 at the Guildhall in the said town, on view of the body of John Lewis, an infant, found that the deceased, walking in a certain close called the Dumball, situated in Cardiff aforesaid, was surrounded by the flowing or coming in of the tide, and, in order to avoid the same, did endeavour to wade through a ditch adjoining to the said Dumball Close; in which ditch the said John Lewis fell, and was then and there suffocated.

In this Bundle are several Indictments of persons for pillaging a wreck called the "Indian Prince," on the coast of Llantwit Major, and stealing therefrom ivory, ebony, &c.

1753.

The Jury present the highway leading from Velindre in the parish of Whitchurch towards the house of Thomas Morgan (called late Mr. Howard's) in the parish of Raddyr, to be out of repair; and that it ought to be repaired by the County.

Coroner's Inquest on the body of David John found that the deceased coming on horseback, on Saturday night the 17th October last, from the town of Cardiff to the place of his abode in the parish of Pendoylan, at or near Cardiff Bridge on the river Taff, the tide and flood being there, was overpowered by the waters and carried down the said river to the Severn; and afterwards, in twelve days, was found drowned on the rocks in a certain place called Sully.

The Bundle contains several sheets of the Depositions of Witnesses in a matter wherein William Rosser was charged with picking the pocket of George Griffiths, of Lanedarn, labourer, at the house of one John Rees, victualler, in the parish of Lanishen. The prosecutor deposes that he went in company with the prisoner to the said inn, "and there they both drank freely till this Examinant was Drunk; upon which this Examinant went to bed and left the sd William Rosser by himself a drinking. And when this Examinant went into bed he did put his breeches under his Head; and when he, this Examinant, awoke next morning, he found his breeches on the Chamber floor—which gave this Examinant a suspicion that somebody or other had picked his pocket of his money. Upon which he did putt his hand in his pockett (in which he had Two and Twenty shillings and sixpence), and found that he had lost Eight shillings and Six pence. Whereupon this Examinant asked the sd John Rees and his wife who it was that was in bed with him, and they sd there was not anyone in bed with him. Whereupon a woman whose name is Mary David told this Examinant that she saw the person in the red Wastcoate (meaning the sd William Rosser), which Came with this Examinant into the sd House and was Drinking with him, Come up into the sd Chamber where this Examint was in bed, at two several times, with a Lighted Candle in his hand each time."

John David, of Lanishen, labourer, deposed that he was Petty Constable of that parish in the year 1751, and was called to arrest accused. "The Company then present told the sd William Rosser: Here is the Constable comed, and thou art sure to go to Cardiffe (meaning the Gaol). Whereupon the said William Rosser jumped off the table whereon he was sitting, and ran away." He was captured and taken before Thomas Lewis, Esqre of Llanishen, a magistrate; "but the sd Justice ordered this Examinant to go back and send the person whose pocket was picked, to have a warrant; but upon this Examints return the sd Wm Rosser was Gone off, and further this Examint saith not."

For stealing seven pounds of Scotch snuff from a shop at Swansea, Jane the wife of John Morgan was sentenced to be "whipt."

Moses David alias Morgan, of Roath, labourer, was sentenced to transportation for stealing from the house of Martha Lewellin, at Roath, some handkerchieves and penknives.

The Depositions re Evan Evans, of Wenvoe, charged with horsestealing, contain several points of interest. Thus the Examination of Thomas Saunders, of the parish of Almondsbury in the county of Gloucester, labourer, taken on oath 21 November 1753 before Michael Richards, Esq., J.P., at Cardiff, states that the Examinant "came to the New Passage on Sunday the fourth Day of this Inst November, with an Intention of Coming over into Wales to Caerphilly Fair in Glamorganshire; but hearing at the sd passage that the sd fair was to be held the old stile, (fn. 4) he, this Examinant, did not go over; but upon his seeing a boate Coming over from the Welsh side, he this Examinant did stay at the sd passage till the sd boate Came over, in order to be better satisfied as to the Certainty of the said fair. And when the sd boate Came over, this Examinant did see no passenger in the sd boate but the prisoner, Evan Evans, whom this Examinant did see since in Cardiffe Gaole."

Edward Sant, of Nowle, near Bristol, in the County of Somerset, proprietor of a public house there called the Man in the Moon, was persuaded by the prisoner to purchase two horses.

Evan Evans, the prisoner, in his Confession declares that Edward Sant desired him to steal a horse from Glamorganshire, and that he accordingly stole a black mare out of a field near Cardiff, and rode her to Nowle. There he delivered her to the said Sant, who afterwards sold the said mare at Pensford fair in Somersetshire.

Prisoner was found guilty and sentenced to transportation.

Cardiff Town. Inquest taken at the Guildhall there, 17 Augt 1753, on view of the body of Elizabeth Evans, late of the said town of Cardiff, spinster, found that the deceased, being on the 27th day of April last standing on the side of the river Taff, near the Quay of the said town, to wash some clothes, accidentally fell into the river and was drowned.

In this Bundle is an Inquest on the body of Mary Morgan, killed by a fall of coal in a mine at Merthyr Tydfil.

1754.

Inquest on the body of Nicholas Meyrick, found that the deceased accidentally fell into a certain well near the East Gate in the Town of Cardiff, situate in the parish of Saint John the Baptist, and was drowned.

The Jury present that Thomas Jones, of Cardiff, baker, and others, have unlawfully erected "in the common and publick street there called Saint Mary's Street, otherwise Saint Mary's parish (fn. 5) (the same street being the King's common highway, from the time whereof the memory of man is not to the contrary)," a certain edifice whereby the said street is obstructed. The Prosecutor was Michael Richards, Esq., and the Witnesses were the same gentleman and Thomas Alban. The Presentment is endorsed "No true Bill."

Alice, wife of Thomas Van, of Cardiff, victualler, was convicted of stealing four gold guineas. She was sentenced "To be hanged by the neck," but these words at foot of the Indictment have been struck through with the pen.

1755.

Glamorganshire. Coroner's Inquest taken at the dwellinghouse of Philip David, innkeeper, situate in the City of Llandaff, on 30 September 1754, on view of the body of Thomas Prees late of the City of Llandaff, aforesaid, labourer, found that the deceased, on the 25th day of August then last past, in a certain close within the said City, commonly called the Hannereg, died naturally.

Glamorgan, to wit Cardiff Town. William Prichard, of Cardiff, labourer, was charged with breaking and entering the house of Henry Durbrow, at Cardiff aforesaid, called the New Angel, and stealing therefrom four gallons of wine called Tent.

The Jury present a number of men and a woman for riotously assembling and destroying the thatch and roof of a certain dwellinghouse in the parish of Eglwysilan, the property of one Hopkin Popkin, otherwise Jones.

Glamorganshire, to wit. Coroner's Inquest taken at Eglwysilan, on view of the body of Morgan Rees, late of the parish of Bedwas, labourer, found that the deceased, by attempting to swim a horse in a certain pool of water called Pwll-Tro in the river Rumney below Bedwas bridge, in the hamlet of Vann, was accidentally "drownded."

John David, of Saint Andrew's, was indicted for stealing from William James, of Cardiff, victualler, the following useful assortment of goods: One large wallet, two shoulders and one rack of veal, one pair of calves' feet, 2¾ yards of woollen cloth, two yards of cheese cloth, and two yards of coarse linen cloth. The Jury were kind enough to find the prisoner "guilty to 10d. value" only.

Josiah Hugh signs (with his mark) a written confession of his murder of Mary Rees, at Penmark. He felled her with a stick, as she was coming from milking the sheep, and then strangled her. He had cherished an unrequited passion for the unfortunate girl. Having pleaded guilty at the trial, the prisoner was sentenced "To be hanged by the Neck and afterwards in Chains."

1756.

Glamorganshire, to wit. Coroner's Inquest taken at the house of Lewis Leyson, innkeeper, in the parish of Lanishan in the county aforesaid, 6 October 1755, before William Gibbon, Coroner, on view of the body of David Rees, found that the deceased, in a certain lane called Hewl hîr in the parish of Lanishan, as he was riding upon a horse before a wagon and oxen, and attempting to turn into a gate, fell down from his horse and was killed.

Coroner's Inquest held at Caerphilly found that David Griffith, late of the parish of Ryddry in the county of Glamorgan, in a certain close or parcel of land in the hamlet of Vann in the parish of Bedwas in the said county, commonly called Coetca Poset, died naturally and not otherwise.

Jurors present the highway leading from the Black Wear to the Great Heath, Cardiff, to be very ruinous and out of repair; and that the same ought to be repaired by the inhabitants of St. John's Parish.

That the bearer of such a name as Christopher Turberville should be a labourer, is nothing unprecedented in the annals of genealogy; but that the name should be borne by a highwayman is startling. Yet Christopher Turberville of Aberavon, labourer, was found guilty of highway robbery, or, as the Indictment words it, for that he (and another man) at the parish of Baglan, with force and arms of and from one James Carson (and another person) did demand money with divers menaces, using these Welsh words: "Sefwch, God dammoch chwi, efe ceiswch arian chwi" (fn. 6) —in English: Stand, God damn you, I want your money!

1757.

Inquest on the body of Anthony Fabian, late of Caira in the county of Glamorgan, labourer, found that the deceased, in a close called Morva bach in the parish of Landaff, died naturally.

1758.

Moses Harry Simon, of Mynyddislwyn, deposed that he lost, out of a closet in his house, one gold ring and one gold signet, which were on a small pewter plate in the said closet; and that when he found the said rings missing, he suspected one Elizabeth William, who was a servant with him and whom he had given leave to go to Caerphilly fair on Saturday last, to have stolen the same. And as she did not return that night, he pursued her and came to a place called the Long Cross in the parish of Roath; and in the house of one Miles Morgan there he found the said Elizabeth William, who at length confessed having stolen the rings and also one quilt petticoat, black stuff one side and blue stuff the other; one lightcoloured camlet gown, "pretty much wore," and one blue and white linen apron.

Coroner's Inquest taken at Newmill in the parish of Lantrissent, on view of the body of Friswith Leonard, infant, found that the deceased, as she was passing by a wheel belonging to the new works in the parish of Pentirch, went to play with the said wheel; which took her by the clothes under it, and accidentally killed her.

1759.

Coroner's Inquest at Cardiff, on view of the body of Edmund fflaharty, found that several sailors of the crew belonging to the ship called the Eagle Galley of Bristol, armed with pikes, swords, cutlasses, pistols and muskets, had in a street in the said town of Cardiff, called Homanby Street, an affray with the crew of the Aldbrough man-of-war, who were similarly armed, and that several pistols and guns were fired, and several blows & wounds given; and that the deceased was then shot by a person unknown.

William Thomas was drowned while riding from Barry Island across to Cadoxton.

1760.

Two persons were drowned in crossing the Taff at Llynfraith, Whitchurch, in a boat.

A milkmaid was tossed over a hedge by a bull, and killed, at Croft Castle Gwibley, Leckwith.

1761.

Inquest on the body of John Thomas, of Cardiff, fisherman, found that he was accidentally drowned while fishing in the river Taff in the town of Cardiff.

Inquest on the body of John Hugh, of Llantrissent, miner, found that he was accidentally killed by a fall of earth, when he was working in a pit of "led oar" in a field called Ddrys-Syog in the parish of Llantrissent.

Inquest on the body of Edward John, of Cardiff, forgeman, found that he was accidentally killed at the forge in the same town, by receiving a blow on his head from a portion of the machinery.

Inquest on the body of Elizabeth Richards, of Llantrissent, spinster, found that she died naturally, in a field called Gwain y Kinkod, in the parish of Llantrissent.

Inquest on the body of Morgan David, of St Andrew's, blacksmith, found that he, at Dinas Powis in the parish of St Andrew's, was driving a mare, the property of Harry Morgan, of the parish of Barry, labourer, to a place near the deceased's smith shop, when she kicked him in his belly; of which kick the said Morgan David accidentally died.

Inquest on the body of George Evans, of Rumney, yeoman, found that he died naturally, on his way from Cardiff to Roath.

Glamorganshire (to Witt). We the Jurors sworn to enquire for our Sovereign Lord the King and the Body of the said County do upon our oath Present that from the time whereof the memory of man is not to the contrary there was and yet is a certain common and antient King's high way leading from the Village of Pentirch in the said County of Glamorgan towards and unto the Town of Cardiff in the said County used for all the liege subjects of our said Lord the King and his predecessors with their horses coaches carts and carriages to go return pass ride and labour at their will and pleasure And that a certain part of the same King's Common Highway between a certain house called the Alms house and a certain dwelling house called Kae Keven situate lying and being in the Parish of Pentirch aforesaid in the County aforesaid containing in length one hundred yards and in breadth five yards on the second day of March in the first year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Third now King of Great Britain &c; and continually afterwards untill the day of the taking of this Inquisition at the said Parish of Pentirch in the County aforesaid was and yet is very ruinous miry deep broken and in such decay for want of due reparation and amendment of the same so [sic] that the liege subjects of our said Lord the King through the same way with their horses coaches carts and carriages could not during the time aforesaid nor yet can go return pass ride and labour without great danger of their lives and the loss of their goods To the great damage and common nuisance of all the liege subjects of our said Lord the King through the same way going returning passing riding and labouring and against the Peace of our said Lord the King his Crown and Dignity And that the said Inhabitants of the Parish of Pentirch aforesaid in the County aforesaid the Common Highway aforesaid so being in decay as aforesaid ought to repair and amend when and so often as it shall be necessary.

Griffiths.
[Endorsed]
Prosecutor: Richd Priest. Witness: Saml
Woodhouse Sworn in Court.

[The words "No True Bill" are added in pencil, and the face of the document is crossed in ink.]

1762

"No True Bill" against Lionel Stibbs, of Neath, innholder, for murdering Thomas Hill, of Neath, collier, by stabbing him at Neath aforesaid. [N.B.—Lionel Stibbs belonged to a well-known Cardiff family.]

John Watkin, of Landaff, charcoal carrier, indicted for clandestinely taking and riding away one brown gelding, with a bridle and saddle, with intent to steal the same.

Katherine Watkin, of the parish of Lantrishint, indicted for stealing a dun mare.

Inquest on the body of John Powell, of the parish of St Mary, Cardiff, aged about 12 years, found that he died naturally in a certain close or parcel of land within the parish of Saint Mary, Cardiff, commonly called Taff's Mead.

1763.

Coroner's Inquest held at Cardiff Guildhall, 23 December 1762, on view of the body of Elizabeth Jones, late of Cardiff, widow; upon the oaths of Thomas Stibbs, Jacob Thomas, Anthony ffell, Thomas Estons, William Bird, William Stone, Richard Driver, William Lacy, William Morgan, Lewis Evan, William James, Robert Jones and Richard Hopkin, honest and lawful men of the said Town of Cardif, found that the deceased, coming from the house of Arthur Tanner in the said Town of Cardiff, towards her dwelling-house, it being then dark, and going too near a certain stream of water called the Millpond, in the said Town of Cardiff, accidentally fell into the said stream and was then and there suffocated.

Hen. Yeomans
Thos. Edwards
Coroners of the
Town of Cardiff.

Inquest taken at the house of John John, in the parish of Penarth in the county of Glamorgan, on view of the body of William John, late of the said parish, labourer, found that the deceased, as he was returning home from Cardiff Fair, was surrounded by the tide and accidentally drowned.

William Gibbon,
Coroner.

Inquest taken at the house of William Richards in the parish of Michaelston-upon-Eley in the county of Glamorgan, on view of the body of Mary William, late of the parish of Landough-juxtaPenarth in the said county, spinster, found that the deceased, as she was returning home from Cardiff Market and endeavouring to go along Leckwith Causeway, was surrounded by the tide and accidentally drowned.

Inquest was taken on the body of an unknown person found dead in a barn called Skybbor y Burtway (fn. 7) , in the parish of Saint Nicholas in the County of Glamorgan.

John William was indicted for feloniously altering the ear marks of a certain white-horned ewe sheep, the property of Owen Punner, at Reynaldstone.

Glamorgan (to Witt). The Jurors of our Lord the King upon their oath Present that on the first day of May in the first year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the third now King of Great Brittain and so forth a certain person to the Jurors unknown did with force and arms at the Parish of Whitchurch in the County of Glamorgan erect and build a certain Cottage for habitation and dwelling of himself and family in a certain place there called Mynidd Buchan otherwise the Great Heath otherwise the Michell Heath otherwise Cardiff Heath otherwise the Town Heath to which cottage the said person did not assign and lay out four acres of ground to be continually occupied and manured therewith so long as the said cottage should be inhabited And that Jenkin Richard late of Whitchurch in the County of Glamorgan aforesaid the said cottage so as aforesaid erected for habitation and dwelling unlawfully and willingly did uphold maintain and continue from the first day of June in the first year of the reign of our said Sovereign Lord the now King untill the first day of August in the third year of the reign of our said Sovereign Lord the now King To which same cottage the said Jenkin Richard did not assign and lay out four acres of ground to be used and occupyed with the same as aforesaid Against the form of the statute in that case made and provided and against the Peace of our said Lord the King his Crown and dignity.

Griffiths.
[Endorsed]
Witnesses: Thomas Edwards, David Lewis
Sworn in Court.
Toovey.

"No True Bill."

1 August, 1763.

Appointment under the hand and seal of Richard Cope Hopton, Esquire, His Majesty's Attorney General for the several counties of Glamorgan, Brecon and Radnor, of William Jephson, of the Middle Temple, London, Esquire, Counsel learned in the Law, to be his Deputy in the said office. Witnessed by Samuel Grove and Thomas Rodgers.

1764.

Inquest taken at the village of St. Bride's-super-Ely in the county of Glamorgan, on the body of William Gyles, an infant, found that the deceased having thrown down a hive of bees, the said bees fastened upon him and stung him in his head and neck; which occasioned strong convulsive fits, by which he died.

William James, of Penmark, was found to have died through drinking a great quantity of water and striving to leap afterwards, thereby bursting a vessel in his body.

A long Presentment by the Grand Jury of the County, to the effect that one Joan Cox, wife of Lewis Cox, of the parish of Roath, labourer, supplied an iron bar to the prisoners in the County Gaol at Cardiff (one of whom was her husband); whereby the said prisoners were enabled to escape out of the custody of the Gaol Keeper, Thomas Lewis. She was found guilty by the Petty Jury. Cox was in prison for burglary at the shop of Evan David, of the parish of saint John Baptist, Cardiff, whence he stole eight Winchester bushels of wheat.

County of Glamorgan. The Information of Harry Thos John, of the Parish of Roath in the said County, Farmer, taken before me one of his Majesties Justices of the Peace in and for the said County.

The said Informant on his Oath saith, that one Evan David of the parish of St John Baptist, Farmer, and David John, Petty Constable in the Parish of Roath and County aforesaid, requested him to aid and assist them the said Evan David and David John to search the Dwelling House of Lewis Cox now Pris'nor in his Majesties County Gaoll in the Town of Cardiff in the sd County of Glamorgan and found in the said Lewis Cox's House 6 Winchester Bushells and a half of wheat which the above Evan David claim'd as his property— and the sd Examinant told the said Lewis Cox's Wife she knew of the stealth of the said wheat. She the said Cox's Wife told the sd Examinant that she Often told her husband that by doing such things he would be Punish'd—upon which her Husband took a Large stik and swore if she mention'd more abt the said wheat he would slitt her in too, and further saith not. Taken before [me] the 23d of Nr 1763.

T. Lewis.

Inquest held at Cardiff Guildhall, on view of the body of Thomas William, late of the parish of Penarth, yeoman, on the oaths of Richard Driver, Charles Stibbs, ffeelix ffox, John Martin, David Llewellin, John James, John King, David Jones, Thomas Waters, John Lewis, Thomas Evans, John Bird and Roger Jones, found that the deceased, going down the river Taff in the boat of our Sovereign Lord the King,1 from the quay of Cardiff towards Penarth, the weather then being very tempestuous, the said boat, by a sudden squall or gust of wind was then overset; by means whereof the said Thomas William was then and there accidentally, casually and by misfortune thrown out of the said boat into the said river Taff, and in the waters thereof was then and there suffocated and drowned.

Inquest on the body of John Hill, found that the deceased, being in a certain coal pit called Branch Pitt in the parish of Neath, and having been there for some time with other persons drinking of ale till he was somewhat intoxicated, did require himself to be winded up to the upper part of the said pit; and having fixed his left foot, as usual, to the gin rope and chain, was winded up to the collar board of the said pit by the landing place; and having also brought up in his arms two gallon "caggs," did, whilst his foot was in the rope and chain, throw out of his hands the said caggs, and being still intoxicated, instantly on such throw fell backwards, disentangled his foot out of the chain and rope, and fell down to the bottom of the said pit, about 52 yards deep; by which fall he shattered himself in such a manner that he instantly died.

Footnotes

1 Holl Ddyledswydd Dyn, &c. ; 3rd ed., Shrewsbury, 1718.
2 Canwyll y Cymry, by Rhys Prichard, of which eight editions had appeared by this time.
3 Cae yr Offeiriad, "the Priest's Close."
4 Just about this time the Gregorian Calendar was coming into general use in Great Britain, and some confusion resulted. Many of the fairs and parish feasts continued to be held upon the old dates.
5 The oldest inhabitants of Cardiff still speak of the southern half of Saint Mary Street as "the Parish."
6 Sefwch, damno chwil Yr wyf yn ceisio eich arian chwi.
7 Ysgubor y Bwrtwe, the Portway Barn. It is interesting to find the Portway (the Roman road) named so late as this, and curious to find the word turned into a feminine Welsh noun.