Schedule of place names
A - F

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

John Hobson Matthews (editor)

Year published

1905

Supporting documents

Pages

337-369

Citation Show another format:

'Schedule of place names: A - F', Cardiff Records: volume 5 (1905), pp. 337-369. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=48203 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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Schedule Of Place-Names.

ABBOT'S LAND, The; otherwise the Back. A tenement in the manor of Roath-Keynsham; situate on Roath Moor and belonging to Pengam (1702, 1703.)

ADAM'S-CROFT. Fifteen acres of land at Adamsdown, mentioned in a Minister's Account of 1492 as having been then lately occupied by the Gatekeeper of Cardiff Castle. In 1542 it was stated to contain eight acres.

ADAMSDOWN. A large piece of land and a messuage in the parish of Roath, just outside the eastern boundary of the town of Cardiff, between Longcross Common and Portmanmoor. It perhaps takes its name from Adam Kyngot, who figures in the municipal charter of 1331 and who seems to have been the Porter of Cardiff Castle. Adamsdown is first mentioned in an Inquisition of 1440. It is referred to in the Minister's Accounts of 1492 and 1542, at which latter date it was stated to contain eleven acres. In the first half of the 19th century Adamsdown was successively a farm-house, the residence of Mr. Whitlock Nicholl, and Mrs. Vaughan's school for girls. It was a slated house with yard and extensive barns and outbuildings, situate at the west side of the G.W.R. line, near the wooden foot-bridge, where now is Adamsdown Square, and was pulled down circa 1875. New Adamsdown Farm is No. 48 Sanquahar Road, East Moors (1895.)

ALLEN'S BANK. A farm situate on the west side of the road leading from Cardiff to Llanishen, opposite the Catholic portion of the Cemetery.

ALLT-GRABAN (the woody hill of the corn marigold.) A house in the hamlet of "Trane" and parish of Llantrisant (1799.)

ALLT-Y-DYDWYLL. Lands in the parish of Llanedern, on the right bank of the river Rhymny (1562.)

"ALYCE HILL." A customary tenement, containing twenty acres, in the manor of Roath-Dogfield (1550.)

ANNES PEWTERER'S LANDS. Seven acres in the parish of Llandaff belonging to the Chapter, 1721. "The lands of Agnes Pewterer" were found to be concealed lands in 1612 and demised to Oliver Robotham.

"ANNEYSWARTH." A warth or pasture by the Severn shore in the lordship of Cogan, scheduled in an Inquisition of 1295.

ANNOTSHAM. A piece of low-lying pasture in the manor of Roath, referred to in a Minister's Account of 1316.

"ANNY BUTCHORS HYNGE," A fishing-place on the West Moors (1616.)

ANTHAM. A parcel of pasture land near the town of Cardiff, referred to in a Minister's Account of 1492. Probably same as Annotsham.

"APPULDORE," Appledore. A place near Llys-tal-y-bont, named in the boundaries of Cardiff Borough as defined by the municipal charter of 1340.

ARCADE, The Old. The first in date of Cardiff's numerous arcades. It forms a passage beneath a part of the Old Arcade Inn, leading from Church Street to the Market.

ARGOED-Y-WLAD, "Argode Wlad" (the grove in the glade.) A member of the lordship of Llantrisant (1307.)

ARLES. A piece of land within the Borough, for which P. John and Richard Griffiths were rated in 1814. There was land bearing the same name in the parish of Llandaff, 1710.

ARMOURY, The, or the Armory. An old house which stands on the east side of Saint Mary Street, opposite the Queen's Hotel. So called because the arms and accoutrements of the local battalion of the Glamorganshire Militia were kept there. It was also the residence of one of the field-officers of that force.

ATLAS FARM. An old thatched house and garden situate near and called after the Atlas Works, on the north side of the G.W.R. main line, near Canton Common. An earlier name for this house was Ty Rhys y Gweydd (Rees the Weaver's house.) It was demolished 1899.

BACK LANE ran east and west between Angel Street and the Castle (1809.)

BACK STREET. A thoroughfare shewn on Speed's map of 1610 as leading from the Castle Gate in a south-easterly direction to West Street, following the line of the present Castle Street.

BACKS, The. A place where were certain pasture lands, in the lordship of Roath, referred to in a Minister's Account of 1492. In the Survey of Roath-Keynsham manor, 1702, it is called the Back, otherwise Abbot's Land.

BAKER'S ROW. A narrow street leading southward from Wharton Street to Barry Lane.

BALCROFT. A piece of pasture in the lordship of Leckwith (1492.) In the Minister's Account of 1456 it is spelt Bolecrofte.

BALDAM-BACH. A free tenement in the parish of Saint Fagan (c. 1670.)

BANK, The. A place near the town of Cardiff, referred to in the Glamorganshire Canal Act 1784.

BARBER'S CROFT. Eight acres and a half and one rood of land in the lordship of Roath, granted to the Gatekeeper of Cardiff Castle shortly before 1492. In the Minister's Account of that year it is called both Barber's Croft and Barber's Close. It was known by the latter name in 1818. Mr. John Stuart Corbett's map shews "Barber's Closes" as situate on the south-east side of Whitmore Lane, just south of Saint Mary's Schools and north of Herbert Street.

BARNWELL. Arable land in the lordship of Llandough, referred to in a Minister's Account of 1392.

BARROSA COTTAGE. A small house taken into the Cemetery after the formation of the latter. It stood a little east of the road from Cardiff to Llanishen, and south-west of the Cemetery as first laid out. The name is probably a memorial of the Peninsular War.

BARRY LANE. A narrow thoroughfare leading eastward from Golden Lion Yard to the Hayes (1894.) In former times the name seems to have applied also to Baker's Row and the narrow passage which now leads across the Morgan Arcade to the disused burial-ground at the back of the Welsh Baptist chapel. It is delineated, but not named, in Speed's map of 1610. A document of 1786 calls it Barrah Lane. Possibly it is the Welsh Heol-y-bara, "Bread Street."

BARRY'S-CROFT. A field containing four acres of customary land "of the greater tenure," in the lordship of Roath (1542.)

BARWE, Barway. Lands in the parish of Llanishen and manor of Roath-Keynsham, holden at a chief rent (1702.)

BAWDALINE ACRE. A field of five acres lying within the manor of Spital and lordship of Roath (1666.)

BEDCROFT. A piece of pasture, in the farm of the grange in the lordship of Leckwith (1492.)

BEDD-Y-CI-DU, "Bethekyddeye" (the grave of the black dog.) A parcel of land in the lordship of Roath-Dogfield (q.v.), with which last name this was erroneously supposed to have some connection. It is a field situate a little to the north of Llanishen church. There is doubtless some interesting lore about the history of this name, if only its origin could be ascertained. See also "Dogowyldescroft."

BEGANSLEY (Payn's mead.) A fee tenement in the lordship of Gwent-llwg, on the left bank of the river Rhymny. In 1314, and for some time after, it was the mansion of the Kemeys family, afterwards of Cefn-Mabli.

BEGANSTON, Beganstone, Beggan (the homestead of Paganus or Payn.) A manor and farm-house late belonging to Jesus College, Oxford. In the reign of Elizabeth it was described as a bailiwick containing two ploughlands. It is situate in the parish of Llandaff, on the borders of Leckwith and Caerau. In an Exchequer Deposition of 1699 it is described as lying in the hamlet of Canton.

BEHIND-THE-WALLS. A place in the lordship of Roath (1492.) The same seems to be referred to in the Account of 1542 as "a tenement containing 11 acres of land, lying 'byneth the waie.'"

BEILI, Y (the Bailey, the steward's house.) In the parish and lordship of Rumney (1712.) An old thatched house near Rumney church is called the Beili-bach, i.e., the little Bailey.

BERLLAN, Y (the orchard), "Berland." A tenement belonging to the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff (1535.)

BERTH-LLWYD, Y (the grey hedge.) A farm in the parish of Lisvane.

BERTON. Three roods of pasture in the lordship of Roath (1492.)

BISBASGL. A place north of Lanrumney, in the parish of Saint Mellon (1840.)

BISKEDAR'S HOUSE (? Biscuiter's house.) A messuage of this name belonged to the Corporation in 1729. It was situate in the East Ward.

BLACK BENCH, The. A submerged bank off Penarth Head. Trees were ordered to be removed thence in 1861.

BLACKFRIARS. The convent of Dominicans, or preaching friars. It was situate close to the left bank of the Taff, between that river and Cardiff Castle. At the Suppression it was granted to the Herbert family, who let out the house in separate tenements, to fishermen and others. It was demolished early in the 19th century, but its foundations are accurately marked out in the Castle Grounds.

BLACKHALL. The Heath Enclosure Award of 1809 mentions the site of a house so called, which was bounded south by the Newport Road and east by Cwrt-bach, near Roath village. It seems to be identical with Llys-du, of which the name

Blackhall is the translation.

BLACK POOL, The (in Welsh Pwll-du.) A fishing-place in the lordship of Roath (1348.)

BLACKSTAKES. A point in the estuary of the river Taff. There is a place called Blackstakes at Chatham Docks.

BLACKWEIR. A hamlet on the left bank of the river Taff and on the North Road, a mile north of Cardiff. So called from an ancient salmon-weir. Here also are Blackweir House and Blackweir Farm (1670, 1750.)

BLAEN-BUALLE, "Blaen Bwellhe." A tenement in the parish of Pentyrch and lordship of Miscyn (1666.)

BLANCH GATE. "A slip or quay" on the river Taff in the town of Cardiff (1666.) A place near the old Quay (1748, 1770.) It was also called the Blunch Gate, Blunts Gate, or Blounts Gate (1823—1837.) The earliest occurrence of the name in a known record is "Blounts Yate," in a Minister's Account of 1542.

The "Quay called the Blunch or Blunt Gate" was ordered to be "taken out," i.e., demolished, in 1785, but the place-name occurs in 1843. The Glamorgan County Offices stand on the site.

BLANKMINSTER, Blanchminster (the white monastery). A Norman name for Whitchurch, in Latin Album Monasterium; applied particularly to the fortified tower of Whitchurch (1314.)

BLIND LANE, The. Another name for Dobbinpits Lane, now Park Place (1782, 1821.)

BLUE HOUSE (in Welsh Ty Glas.) An old mansion of the Lewis family, in the parish of Llanishen.

BOOT CROFT. A field of twelve acres in the parish of Leckwith (1717.)

BORING MILL, The Old. The Old Copper Mills, on the Old Quay (1777, 1788, 1794, 1847.)

BOTTLEWOOD, "Botelwode," "Byttlewood." A wood in the lordship of Cogan (1492, c. 1540.)

"BRADESTREM" (Broad Stream,) the southern and seaward boundary of the Liberties of Cardiff, as defined by the municipal charter of 1340. It seems to mean the mouth of the river Taff, in the Bristol Channel.

BRADLEY'S BUILDINGS. Homanby (1821.)

BRENDON, Brundon Lands. Certain lands within the lordship of Roath, referred to in a Minister's Account of 1492. In 1542 it is called Brandon. Mr. J. S. Corbett's annotated map of Cardiff shews Brundon Lands as lying on Roath Moor, south-east of the G.W.R., north of the Splot, with a lane called Brundon Way bordering them on the south.

BRIDGE HOUSE, The. A messuage at the east end of Cardiff Bridge, on the north side of West Street; consisting of two separate tenements, a burgage and half a burgage respectively (1542.)

BRIDGE STREET. A thoroughfare just outside the east wall of the town, leading from the Hayes bridge eastward to the Crockherbtown feeder. It was made out of the Tumbling Close in 1825.

BRINDER LANE, The. South of Longcross House (1835.) It is called Brinden Lane in the Heath Enclosure Award 1809.

BROAD STREET. A short street which ran north and south and united the western ends of Castle Street and Angel Street (1715.) It was demolished in 1877.

BROADWAY. The wide street which leads from Clifton Street, Roath, eastward to join the Newport Road near the railway bridge. Until 1875 it was known as Green Lane.

"BRODESLYME," Broadslime. One of the boundaries of Cogan Moor (c. 1290.)

BRO-MISCYN, "Bromiskin" (the lowland of Miscyn.) A part of the parish of Llantrisant (1776.)

BRONAU, Y; "The Bronny" (the breasts.) Fourteen acres of land in the parish of Llandaff (1722.)

BROTH LANE. An old name for Wharton Street, Worten Street, Porridge Lane, or Heol-y-cawl.

BROVEY, The. A field of arable land on the highway from Fairwater to Saint Fagan's, belonging to the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff (1649.)

BRU-NANT. A stream which flows southwards from the Cefn range and forms the boundary between the parishes of Llanishen and Whitchurch.

BRYN-CARADOG, "Brun Cradock" (Caradoc's hill.) In the parish of Llantrisant (1738.)

BRYNHILL-FAWR. A farm in the parish of Lisvane.

BRYN-HYFRYD (pleasant hill.) A house in the village of Leckwith, south of the church.

BRYN WELL. A farm in the parish of Leckwith, near the borders of Caerau.

BRYN-Y-GYNEN (the hill of contention.) The ancient mansion of the family of Mathew of Llandaff, now called Llandaff Court. It bore the older name in 1578.

BULLCROFT. A large field in the parish of Leckwith, between White Farm and the borders of Michaelston-le-pit (1768.)

BULLCROFT BROOK. Divides the parishes of Caerau, Leckwith and Michaelston-le-pit.

BULL-RING, The. The open space where the sport of bull-baiting was carried on, under Corporation control. It seems to have been the cross-ways at the junction of Queen, North and Duke Streets with Saint John's Square (1767, 1774.)

BULWARKS, The. The name formerly given to a portion of the west side of Saint Mary Street, from the south side of the Theatre Royal to the Queen's Hotel on the north (1823, 1864.) The place was so called from the stone embankment there, constructed for the purpose of resisting the eastward encroachment of the river Taff. The Bulwarks were open, save for a two-rail fence, to the bed of the river, which here had a depth of 10 to 15 feet.

BUTE STREET. A mile-long thoroughfare leading from the Hayes southwards to the Pier Head at the Docks, through the maritime portion of the town. It was constructed c. 1840, across the Moors. For some years the northern-most section of this street was known as Lewis Street, and the part at the south end as Bute Road—these two ends having been made some years earlier and later, respectively, than the intermediate portion—but the distinction is no longer maintained.

BWLCH-Y-GWYNT (the gap or pass of the wind.) A farm in the parish of Pentyrch.

CABARN-PLWCA. A place on the border between Llystalybont manor and the Mynachdy lands (1653.)

CADAIR-WEN (the white chair.) A farm in the parish of Pentyrch.

CAEAU-ERWON (the acre closes.) Two tenements in Roath (1600.)

CAEAU-GWYNION (the white closes.) A freehold tenement in the parish of Llanishen and manor of Llystalybont (1653.)

CAE-BUDR (the putrid close.) One of the four Gallows Fields taking their names from the public executions there anciently performed (1721, 1803.)

CAE-BUTTON (Button's close.) In Llandaff parish (1647.)

CAE-CARADOG, Cae Cradoc (Cradock's close.) Two acres in the parish of Cogan (1708.)

CAE-CASTELL (the castle close.) The enclosure within an ancient camp on the east side of the river Rhymny, in the parish of Rumney, north of Rumney bridge.

CAE-CEFN, "Kae Keven" (the close of the ridge.) A tenement in the parish of Pentyrch (1761.)

CAE-CENOL, "Kae Kenoll" (the middle close.) At Llandaff (1542.)

CAE-CIBWR. Arable land in the manor of Llystalybont, near Llanishen (1653.)

CAE-CLAWDY. A close of pasture land within the Borough, for which the Marquess of Bute was rated (1814.)

CAE-CYNRIC (the close of Kenrick or Cynfrig.) A field in the lordship of Senghenydd, on the northern boundary of RoathKeynsham (1702.)

CAE-DAFYDD-MELAN (David Melan's close.) A field belonging to the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff (1535.) It was a parcel of arable land on the highway from Llandaff to Ely (1649.)

CAE-DYRYSIOG, "Cae Ddrys-Syog" (the brambly close.) A field in the parish of Llantrisant.

CAE-FFYRLING (the farthing close.) A tenement in the manor of Pentyrch (c. 1670.)

CAE-GARW (the rough close.) In the parish of Llanishen (1583.)

CAE-GLAS (the green close.) 3½ acres in the parish of Llantrisant (1655.)

CAE-GWALCHMAI (Gwalchmai's close.) A tenement in the manor of Pentyrch and Clun (c. 1670.)

CAE-IS-Y-GWELYDD (the close below the walls.) A field in the parish of Lisvane (1597.)

CAE-LLWYD (the grey or venerable close.) Near Llanishen (1653.)

CAE-MARL (the marl close.) A field in the parish of Llanedern (1598.)

CAE-MURCH (probably Cae Meirch, the close of the war-horses.) A field in the parish of Llanishen.

CAE-PAEN, "Kayer Paine" (Payn's close.) Five acres on the north side of the road from Llandaff to Peterston, demised, with a house and garden, to Henry Morgan of "Rubinay" by the Chapter of Llandaff in 1612.

CAE-PICA (the peaked close.) A field in the parish of Lisvane (1597.)

CAE-PLWCYN (the close of the little pleck.) A field in the parish of Llanedern (1598.)

CAE'R-BERLLAN (the orchard close.) In the hamlet of Fairwater (1710.)

CAE'R-BONT (the bridge close.) In the parish of Llandaff (1732.)

CAE'R-CASTELL (the castle close.) A "cottage or booth" near Canton Green, belonging to the Chapter of Llandaff (1604, 1730.) Perhaps King's Castle is the one referred to.

CAE'R-HANER, "Kayer hanar" (the close of the half.) In the parish of Llandaff; property of the Chapter (1606.)

CAE'R-PWLL (the close of the pool.) Four acres of pasture belonging to the Chapter of Llandaff (1612.)

"CAE'R VID VOL" (? Cae'r fidwal, the close of the encampment.) In the parish of Saint John Baptist, on a road leading to Cathays (1749.)

CAE'R-YRFA (the close of the course.) A tenement in the parish of Pentyrch and lordship of Miscyn (1666.) It formed part of Pen-llwyn-Cynfyn-isaf.

CAE SIAWNSLER, "Kay Chancelor" (the Chancellor's close.) A field near Pensisli, in the parish of Llandaff, belonging to the Chancellor of the diocese (1543.)

CAE-SION-BACH (Little John's close.) Two acres belonging to the Chapter of Llandaff (1666.)

CAE-SION-FERCH-IFAN-BACH (the close of Joan, daughter of Little Evan.) A field in the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff (1535.)

CAE-SION-MEURIG, "John Merikescroft." A close in the lordship of Roath (1440.)

CAE-SYR-DAFYDD (Sir David's close.) A field in the southern suburbs of Llandaff, now a public garden. Formerly a portion of the hereditary estate of Sir David Mathew of Llandaff, who flourished in the 15th century.

CAE-TIR-CLOI (the croft of the closed land.) Parcel of the manor of Llystalybont (1653.)

CAE-TIR-HYWEL (the close of the land of Howel.) A free tenement at Cefn-coed in the parish of Llanedern and manor of Roath-Keynsham (1702.)

CAE-TWC (the tuck close.) A piece of pasture land, eight acres in extent, in the parish of Roath. According to the Heath Enclosure Award of 1809, it was a messuage and farm comprising a little over ten acres, adjoined the lands of Maindy farm, and was bounded on one side by the road leading from Roath village to the Caerphilly Road.

CAE-Y-DINTWR, "Kaye y Dyntur" (the dyer's close.) A field in the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff (1535.) It was a piece of pasture ground on the highway from Llandaff to Fairwater (1649.)

CAE-Y-GROES (the close of the cross.) A piece of arable land near the highway from Llandaff to Radyr; parcel of the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff (1649.)

CAE-Y-GROES-LLWYD (the close of the venerable cross), "Kae-yrvroes Lloyd." Three acres of arable land on the highway from Llandaff to Ely, belonging to the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff (1612, 1649.)

CAE-Y-LLETHR (the close on the slope.) A field in the parish of Lisvane (1597.)

CAE-YN-Y-GARTH (the close in the Garth.) A tenement in the manor of Pentyrch (c. 1670.)

CAE-Y-PARC, "Caireparke" (the park close.) Twenty-one acres in the lordship of Whitchurch (1492.)

CAE-YR-OFFEIRIAD, "Kaer ffirad" (the priest's close.) In the parish of Llandaff (1747.)

CAE-YR-YSGUBOR (the close of the barn.) "Five quarters of ground" in the parish of Llandaff, the property of the Chapter (1609.)

CAERAU (pron. "Caira" and meaning the Roman camp.) A parish 3½ miles south-west from Cardiff. The ancient encampment from which it takes the name has been identified with the Jupupania of Ptolemy, in Welsh Tref-iwbwb, "the town of wailing." The manor of Caerau is or was held under the lordship of Llandaff. In 1545 it belonged to a cadet branch of the Mathew family.

CAER-GLYN-TAF (the camp in the Taff Vale.) A tenement of land in the parish of Llantrisant (1547.)

CAER-WEN (the white camp.) A farm in the parish of Pentyrch.

CALF ROCK, The. On the south-east shore of the Steep Holm.

CAMP STREET, or Camp Lane (1821.) Running Camp occasionally bore these names.

CANONS' FARM, or Canna's Farm. A tenement in the parish of Llandaff (1732.) It belonged to the prebend of Saint Andrew in the cathedral church.

CANTON, in Welsh Treganna (Saint Canna's town.) A populous hamlet in the parish of Llandaff, but partly in that of Saint John, Cardiff; the boundary being a brook, traces of which, with a boundary stone, lately remained near an old house in Cathedral Road. The whole lies on the right or western bank of the river Taff, opposite Cardiff. The surname De Kanetune appears early in the 13th century, and Canton was then a fee with lands held under it. In 1852 the principal house, which stands on the west side of Canton Common, was known as Canton Manor-house, and was a freehold tenement under the manor of Llandaff.

CANTON CROSS. A place on the south side of Cowbridge Road, where a road branches off southwards to Canton Common. The houses here are old, and one of them is the Cross Inn. A little further east, on the same side of the street, stood the Canton oak, a famous old tree.

CAPEL-LLANILLTERN (Saint Illtern's chapel.) In the parish of Saint Fagan (1745.)

CAPEL-Y-CELYN (the chapel by the holly-trees.) A farm in the parish of Llanedern.

CARDIFF. Welsh Caerdydd. The administrative and commercial capital of the ancient kingdom, mediaeval lordship and modern county of Glamorgan. The first half of the word is the Welsh form of the Latin castra, a fort; the etymology of the second half has not yet been ascertained. The earliest known spelling is Cairti (late 11th cent.) It seems likely that the second syllable of this place-name is a modification of Tib, and that this was one of two pre-Aryan names for the river Taff. (See Taff and Roath.) (fn. 1) There is a daughter-city of Cardiff in the coal district of New South Wales; and a Cardeeth in the parish of Carew, Pembrokeshire. Walton-Cardiff is a parish and village near Tewkesbury, in the county of Gloucester, and owes its name to the former connection of Cardiff with Tewkesbury Abbey. A tract of uncultivated land in the county of Carmarthen, called the Forest of Cardiff, was demised by the Crown to John Morgan Wolphe in 1582.

CARDIFF ARMS PARK. A large piece of meadow land on the left bank of the river Taff, just below Cardiff Bridge. It takes its present name from the old Cardiff Arms inn, but was formerly known as the Drying Hayes, (fn. 2) and seems to have been common land in old times. It is perhaps identical with the Town Mead of mediaeval records. Previous to 1885 or thereabouts, it was commonly called the Little Park.

CARDIFF BRIDGE. Over the river Taff, near the Castle. It connects the town with Canton, the nearest western suburb. Also called Canton Bridge, and the Taff Bridge; but Cardiff Bridge is its correct official designation. In the Middle Ages a wooden bridge was erected here, at the ford. A stone one was built in the 18th century; (fn. 3) but taken down in 1796 when the present one, of stone with iron girders, was substituted for it, a few yards lower down the stream. It was renovated in the 19th century and widened, with the addition of iron balustrades and lamps.

CARDIFF GREEN. A piece of common pasture land on the right bank of the river Taff, near the west end of Cardiff Bridge, on the south side of the Cowbridge Road. Westbourne Crescent and other streets have been built upon it. Green Street perpetuates its memory.

CARDIFF GROUNDS. A mud-bank in Penarth Roads.

CARDIFF SPIT. A small bank south of Cardiff Grounds, marked by a buoy.

CAREG-PICA (the peaked stone) An artificial eminence or mound in the south-eastern angle of the outer wall of Cardiff Castle, behind the Glove and Shears inn, at the corner of Duke Street and North Street (1797, 1833.) It was probably thrown up in the Norman period, to afford a post of observation for the garrison. Its English name was Castle Mount (1845.)

CARN-CYNLAS (the rocky hill of Cynlas.) A piece of land in the parish of Llantrisant (1655.)

CARVER'S HOUSE, The. A messuage at the west end of the middle row between Angel Street and Castle Street (1542.) The site was later occupied by the Malster's Arms inn.

CASTAN (? the chesnut.) A brook dividing the lordships of RoathKeynsham and Senghenydd, near Whitchurch (1702.)

CASTELLAU (the castles.) A hamlet in the parish of Llantrisant (1799.)

CASTELL-COCH (the red castle.) A mediaeval stronghold at the entrance to the Taff Vale, on the river's left bank and at the western end of the Cefn range. It was restored and rendered habitable by its proprietor, the third Marquess of Bute, towards the end of the 19th century. There are the remains of a much earlier fortress on the hill at the back of the castle.

CASTELL-MORGRAIG. A mediæval rectangular fortress on the southern slope of Cefn-on. Almost all that is at present known of this structure may be summed up in the words of Dyer:—

"Tis now the raven's bleak abode,
'Tis now th' apartment of the toad;
And there the fox securely feeds,
And there the poisonous adder breeds,
Concealed in ruins, moss and weeds."

CASTELL-Y-MYNEICH (the monks' castle.) An ancient mansion, long the seat of a branch of the Mathew family, in the parish and manor of Pentyrch, of which last it is or was a freehold tenement (1550.)

CASTELL-Y-WY. A house at the entrance of Roath Court Lane (1801.)

CASTLE BAILEY, The. The precincts of the Castle; i.e., that portion of the town which lay under the Castle walls on the south-east, in Duke Street and North Street (1559.)

CASTLEFIELD. A house and piece of land near Llystalybont, on the site of some ancient and forgotten stronghold (1801.) Roman coins and red pottery were unearthed here circa 1860, when the land was first ploughed up.

CASTLE ROAD. An important road, or rather, street, leading northward from the Newport Road to Crwys Road. It took this name, in 1874, from "Roath Castle" (as Plas-newydd was then styled,) but had been previously known as Heol-yplwca, or Plwcca Lane.

CATHAYS, The Cat Hayes. The immediate north-eastern suburb of Cardiff. The name originally stood for an open tract of common land, now represented by Cathays Park. The name, which is found at other towns also, would seem to point to the site of a battle—Welsh cad, Irish cáth. 1699, 1725.

CATHAYS GRANGE, the Heath Grange, or "Grange Farm, Cathays." An ancient thatched stone farmhouse and barn on the north-western outskirts of Cathays, towards Llystalybont. It was the grange for the Manor of Roath-Tewkesbury. The buildings were demolished 1899. They were situate at the west-end of Llantrisant Street.

CATHEDRAL ROAD. A wide thoroughfare at Canton, with handsome villa residences, leading from the Cowbridge Road northwards to Llandaff Fields. This road was constructed circa 1880, to replace the old lane from the West Moors and Whitehouse along the river-side to Plas-Turton and PontCanna.

CAWSY-CRIBYN (the causeway of the crest.) A rivulet by the Cowbridge Road in the parish of Llandaff (1815.)

CEFN-BYCHAN (the little ridge.) A farm in the parish of Pentyrch.

CEFN-CARNAU (the ridge of stone-heaps.) One of the eminences on the Cefn chain of hills, north of Cardiff. The same name is applied to an old Elizabethan farm-house which stands on the southern slope of the hill.

CEFN-COED ("the woody ridge.") A long, low hill to the northeast of Cardiff, lying in the parishes of Roath and Llanishen, and terminating south-east with the spur called Pen-y-lan. The name is applied particularly to a farm halfway along the summit. There is also Cefn-coed Fach (Little Cefn Coed) slightly to the north-west, and Cefn-coed Uchaf (Upper cefn Coed) near the northern end of the ridge. Heol-y-Cefncoed, "the Cefn Coed Road," is called after this hill. The name is locally pronounced "Kingcode," and may be recognised in the surname of Adam Kyngot, occurring in the municipal charter of circa 1331.

CEFN-COLSTON (Colston ridge.) A farm in the parish of Pentyrch.

CEFN-MABLI (the ridge of Mabel.) An ancient mansion in the chapelry of Llanfedw, Glamorgan, on the right bank of the river Rhymny; an ancestral seat of the Kemeys family.

CEFN-ON (the ridge of ash-trees.) A part of the Cefn range of hills to the north of Cardiff. It is in the commote of Senghenydd.

CEFN-POETH (the hot ridge.) A hill at the junction of the parishes of Llanedern and Llanfedw, forming the north-eastern boundary of the manor of Roath-Keynsham (1702.)

CEFN-TRE-BAEN (the ridge of the habitation of Payn), "Keven Tree Paynes lands." A freehold messuage with meadows and woods in the parishes of Saint Fagan and Pentyrch, in the lordship of Miscyn (1595, 1666.)

CEFN-Y-GWYNDON (the ridge of the white layland.) A tenement in the parish of Saint Fagan and lordship of Miscyn (1666)

CEFN-Y-WRACH ("the Hag's Back.") A reef off Penarth Head (1873.)

CELYN, Y (the holly-trees.) A farmhouse on the east side of the Nant-mawr, near the north end of Roath Park.

CELYN-BACH. A small farmhouse on the west side of Roath Park.

CHAIR, The. A place on the Great Heath (1820.)

CHAPEL FARM, Pen-y-lan. Quære whether identical with CapelDenys or Ty'r-capel.

CHURCH STREET. The thoroughfare which leads from the High Cross (q.v.) eastwards to Saint John's church tower. It was formerly called Saint John Street, but then extended as far as the east end of the church, on the north side. It was sometimes termed Church Lane in 1811.

CHWECH-ERW-ISLAW-Y-CAWSY ("the six acres below the causeway.") A field in Roath, mentioned in the Heath Enclosure Award of 1809.

CIBWR. Anciently Cibwyr. (In English spelling Kibor, Kibbor or Kibworth.) A commote of Glamorgan, bounded west by the Commote of Llandaff and east by the Hundred of Gwentllwg. It was styled Cantref Brenhinol, "the Royal Hundred," because it contained Cardiff, the caput baroniæ. Cardiff, however, appears to have been sometimes considered a commote or Hundred in itself; and when, in the reign of Henry VIII., the County of Glamorgan and its present Hundreds were constituted, the Commotes of Llandaff and Kibor were formed into the Hundred of Cardiff or Kibor, while the Borough was still kept distinct from the Hundred. The Commote of Kibor appears, however, still to subsist as an independent Lordship for some purposes. There is a river in Pembrokeshire called the Kybur, Kibor or Cibwr.

CIDER CELLAR, The Old. A low, stone-built house, of considerable antiquity, with massive, square, freestone chimnies; half-way up the east side of Womanby. It fell into ruin in 1894.

CIL-ELY (the cell of Ely.) A piece of land in the parish of Llantrisant (1655.)

CIL-YNYS (the cell-island.) A house on the west side of the river Taff, south of the Garth mountain.

CLAT-CELYNOG, "Clatt y clinog" (? the holly plot.) A copyhold tenement in the manor of Llystalybont, near Llanishen (1653.)

CLAWDD-HELIG (the dike of willows.) A place in the parish of Llandaff (1592.)

CLAWDD-Y-CWNSTABL, "Clauthe Constable" (the Constable's dike.) A place on the western boundary of the Commote of Llandaff. (c. 1530.)

CLERK'S HOUSE, The. In the parish of Roath, near the church and the mill (1809.)

CLIP-COCH (the red declivity.) A dike or embankment, with a declivity on the west side only; on the right bank of the river Ely, near its mouth, in the parish of Leckwith.

CLUN, "Clonne." A manor in Miscyn Hundred; a member of the lordship of Llantrisant (1307.)

COCK HILL. High land in the parish of Leckwith, north of the village.

COCK'S TOWER, The; "Cokes Towre," or "Cox's Tower." A watchtower which stood on the east wall of Cardiff, at the Hayes (1781.) Some remains of it may still be traced. It is perhaps to be identified with Coquemarel, the ancient prison of the borough (1550.) It stood on the bend of the moat, now the Canal, until about 1860; but was then pulled down, all save a low portion of the south-east corner, the approach whereto was up an alley called Evans' Court.

COED-BACH (small wood.) A little north-east of Coed-mawr, in Llanishen parish.

COED-CAE (the enclosed wood.) A copyhold tenement in the manor of Llystalybont (1673.)

COEDCA-DARREN (the tree-close of the knoll.) A parcel of land in the parish of Llantrisant (1655.)

COED-CAE-GWYDDAU (the goose-close wood.) At Coed-y-gores in the parish of Llanedern.

COED-CATI-ROSSER (Kate Rosser's wood.) On the right bank of the river Ely, just below Leckwith bridge.

COED-CREIGIAIDD (rocky wood.) In the parish of Leckwith, between the village and the river Ely.

COED-FFRANC (the Frenchman's wood.) North-east of Pen-y-lan.

COEDGAE'R-POSET, "Coetca Poset" (the quickset hedge of the posset.) A close in the hamlet of the Van and parish of Bedwas (1756.)

COED-GROES (Cross-wood.) A wood on the river Ely, in the manor of Llandaff (1740.)

COED-HOEL1 (Howel's Wood.) On the northern boundary of the manor of Llystalybont (1653.)

COED-MAWR (great wood.) In the parish of Llanishen, north of Fairoak, on the east side of the Nant-mawr.

COED-SION-HYWEL (fn. 4) (John Howel's wood.) In the parish of Leckwith, in the angle between the road to Dinas Powys and the road to Llandough.

COED-Y-CAEAU (the wood of the closes.) On the Heath, in the parish of Llanishen (1840.)

COED-Y-CAPEL (chapel wood.) In the parish of Llanedern, to the west of the ancient chapel near Coed-y-gores.

COED-Y-CHWAER (the sister's wood.) In the parish of Rumney, north of the village.

COED-Y-CLORIAN (the wood of the balance?) A farm in the parish of Llanedern, south of the village.

COED-Y-COCSI, "Coed-y-coxy." A wood on the hill near Cefncoed farm, in the manor of Roath (1840.)

COED-Y-CWAREL (the wood of the quarry.) In the parish of Rumney (1840.)

COED-Y-CYMDDA (the common wood.) Borders the parishes of Llandaff and Leckwith.

COED-Y-DDYLLUAN (the owl's wood.) In the parish of Leckwith, on the borders of Michaelston-le-pit.

COED-Y-FRENHINES (the Queen's wood.) At Cefn-coed, in the parish of Llanedern.

COED-Y-GORES (the gorse wood.) A hamlet and mansion in the parish of Llanedern, on the right bank of the river Rhymny. In it is the ancient chapel of Llanforda. The mansion was the home of a branch of the Morgan family in the 18th century.

COED-Y-MILWR (the soldier's wood.) North-east of Pen-y-lan.

COED-Y-PARLMENT (parliament wood.) On the Pant-bach brook in the parish of Llanedern, on the northern municipal boundary of Cardiff.

COED-YR-HEN-WR (the wood of the old man.) A tenement in Cooper's Fields, opposite Blackweir (1840.)

COED-YSTOFER (the estover wood.) In the parish of Leckwith, west of the village, on the right bank of the river Ely.

COG, The. A stream which flows through and gives its name to the lordship and parish of Cogan. On it is a house called the Cog Farm. If the name is Aryan, it is probably a Celtic root implying noise, babble (Irish cogar, whispering.)

COGAN (o short.) Welsh Cwgan. A village, parish and manor at the foot of the Leckwith hills, in the Hundred of Dinas Powys, three miles west of Cardiff. The name is taken from that of the Cog rivulet, which flows through the parish into the river Ely. The ancient family of Cogan derived their patronymic from this place, of which they were the feudal lords for several generations. A branch of the Herberts were seated here in the 16th and 17th centuries, in a mansion now known as Cogan Farm.

COGAN DINGLE. On the west side of the highroad from Cogan Pill to Penarth.

COGAN DOWN. Fifty acres of arable land in the lordship of Cogan (1492.)

COGAN HALL. An ancient mansion at the village of Cogan.

COGAN PILL. The lowest-lying part of the parish of Llandough, on the right bank of the river Ely. In consequence of the forming of Penarth Docks, this is now a populous and busy town. Here is an ancient mansion called Cogan Pill, which belonged to a branch of the Herbert family; but it is in the parish of Llandough. A Minister's Account of 1492 refers to "the stream called Cogan Pylle."

COOPER'S FIELDS. A long stretch of pasture land on the left bank of the Taff, between that river and the Castle. Now part of the Castle Grounds.

COPPET LANE, "Coppyd Lane." At Llandaff (1542.)

COQUEMAREL. The ancient prison of Cardiff borough, which had a dungeon beneath the moat. It is perhaps identical with the Cock's Tower. Fox's "Book of Martyrs" says that Rawlins White, convicted of heresy, was confined here in Queen Mary's reign.

CORFHAM. A place within the salt-marsh of the lordship of Leckwith (1456.)

CORNEL-Y-WAUN (the corner of the meadow.) A farmhouse on the west side of Gwaun-tre-Oda, or Whitchurch Common.

CORNER HOUSE. The house which is now the shop and library of Mr. Dobbin, bookseller, No 1 Saint Mary Street, at the southwest corner of Church Street. It was the town house of the Richards family in 1785, but was a Bank circa 1845. It must not be confused with High Corner House.

CORNERS-WELL. A farm in the parish and manor of Cogan (c. 1540, 1885.)

CORWG (the trunk.) A place in the parish of Eglwysilan (1793.)

COSMESTON, Upper and Lower. Two homesteads to the west of Penarth. The name is a corruption of Costyn's-town.

COSTINSTON, Cosmeston, Coston. A lordship comprising the parish of Lavernock and a portion of Penarth. Its name is derived from the family of Costyn (fn. 5) ; one of whom, Thomas de Costyn, held a messuage and two ploughlands at Cysteyneston (1307.)

"COURESMEDE." A piece of land in the lordship of Roath (1440); perhaps identical with Sourland or Cowmead.

COURT COLMAN ROW. A street outside the South Gate (1878.)

COURT FURLONG, Great and Little. Two parcels of land measuring sixteen and four acres respectively, in the lordship of Roath (1492.)

COWBRIDGE ROAD. The principal western outlet from Cardiff, running through the hamlets of Canton and Ely, and the parishes of Llandaff and Saint Fagan, westward to Cowbridge. It is practically identical with the corresponding portion of the Via Julia (q.v.)

COW CLOSE. A field at the Grey Friars (c. 1540.)

COWMEAD. Three acres of meadow in the lordship of Cogan (1492.)

CRAG, The. Four acres of concealed land demised by the Chapter of Llandaff, in 1612, to Oliver Robotham.

CRAIG-CIBWR (Cibwr rock.) A hill on the northern boundary of the lordship of Roath-Keynsham (1653, 1702.)

CRAIG-ELEN (Helen's rock), or perhaps Craig Ilan, Saint Ilan's rock. At Cefn-coed (1702.)

CRAIG-LLANISHEN (Llanishen rock.) On the northern boundary of the manor of Llystalybont (1653.)

CRAIG-MAES-Y-GWYNT (the rock of the field of the wind.) Land at Cefn-coed in the parish of Llanedern and manor of RoathKeynsham, holden at a chief rent (1702.)

CRAIG-WILYM (William's rock.) A tenement in the parish of Pentyrch and lordship of Miscyn (1666.)

CRAIG-Y-CASTELL (the castle rock.) A free tenement in the parish of Llanishen and manor of Roath-Keynsham (1702.)

CRAIG-Y-LLWYN (the rock of the bush.) Lands in the parish of Llanedern (1702.)

CRAIG-Y-MOEL (the rock of the bare, round hill.) A tenement in the parish of Pentyrch and lordship of Miscyn (1666.)

CREIGIAU (the rocks.) A farm and hamlet in the parish of Pentyrch, at the southern foot of the high land.

CROCKHERBTOWN, "Crokkerton." The immediate eastern suburb of Cardiff, viz., the houses lining the thoroughfare which continues from Queen Street and the East Gate eastward towards Newport Road. It was anciently either the street in which crock-herbs, i.e., vegetables for the pot, were sold, or the district in which kitchen gardens were most numerous As confirming this derivation of the name, it is significant that, in 1542, free tenements were here holden of the lordship of Roath by "kitchen-rent," i.e., by the service of providing certain minor articles of food for the lord's kitchen. The name is met with in other old towns. A few years ago, the old word was abolished by a Minute of Council, and the name Queen Street extended to the entire thoroughfare as far east as the two railway bridges. It ought to be restored. When it was abolished, the name Crockherbtown House was given by Mr. Grover to his Early Victorian residence at the south-west corner of Park Place, which was demolished 1898; but it would seem that the name was earlier borne by a smaller house on the north side of the same street, immediately east of Saint John's Schools playground.

CROES-FAEN (the stone cross.) In the parish of Pentyrch (1751, 1792.)

CROES-WEN (white cross.) A house in Radyr parish, a little north-west of the village.

CROFFT-CASTELL-Y-GWIBLU, "Croft Castle Gwibley" (the croft of the castle of the vagrant band.) A field in the parish of Leckwith (1760.)

CROFFT-EGINYN (the croft of the young shoot.) A field in the parish of Saint Fagan (c. 1670.) A will of 1728 calls it "Croft y Gunny."

CROFFT-Y-FFYNON (the croft of the well.) A quarter of an acre belonging to the Chapter of Llandaff (1747.)

CROSHAM. Four acres and one rood of meadow in the salt-marsh of the lordship of Leckwith (1492.)

CROSS COTTAGE. An old cottage at the south-east corner of Cefncoed Lane and the Merthyr Road (now Pen-y-lan Road and Albany Road.) Demolished 1899.

CROSS STREET. An old thoroughfare leading from Frederick Street westward to Hill's Terrace, on the south side of Queen Street.

CRWYS-BYCHAN (Little Crwys.) A farmstead in the parish of Saint John, on the northern outskirts of the town, beyond Cathays. The lands were built upon and the house demolished in 1899, when the Board Schools were erected on the site, opposite the south-western corner of the Cemetery, at the top of Crwys Road. If the name is an abbreviation of Caer-wys, one would suppose that there was anciently a fortified camp by a brook at this spot. Circa 1540, this was a copyhold tenement held under the Cardiff Grange of Margam Abbey.

CRWYS-MAWR (Great Crwys.) A tenement situate some distance to the east of the last, nearer Roath village. It disappeared so long ago that its position can only be guessed at.

CRWYS ROAD. A wide thoroughfare forming a continuation of Castle Road northward, across the Rhymney Railway, to join the North Road at Pentre, Whitchurch. It takes its name from Crwys-bychan farm.

CRYSTAL COVERT. A wood on the Heath, in the parish of Llanishen.

CULVER HOUSE. A farm in the parish of Saint Fagan.

CUTLER-ACRE. An acre of meadow in the lordship of Roath, destroyed by a flood in 1492. It was doubtless the perquisite of the lord's cutler. Cutler's Close (1737.)

CUT-THROATS. One of the four Gallows Fields taking their names from the public executions there anciently performed (1730, 1803.)

CWM, Y (the dale.) A farm in the parish of Llanishen. Also the low land around Llandaff Cathedral (1683.)

CWM-CAER-ELEY (the dale of the fortified camp on the Elai.) Freehold lands near Llanishen, in the manor of Llystalybont (1653.)

CWM-CEDWYN (Cedwyn's dale.) A woody dell on the right bank of the river Ely, between the parishes of Leckwith and Llandough.

CWM-NOFYDD, "Cwm Novith." A tenement in or near Whitchurch (1735, 1789.)

CWM-Y-FWYALCHEN (the dale of the blackbird.) An ancient thatched house at the hamlet of Ffilog, Whitchurch, on the west side of the Llanishen Road.

CWRT, The. A brook flowing into the sea west of Penarth Head.

CWRT-BACH (the little court). Also called Roath Court Farm.

An old farmhouse situate on the opposite side of the lane (now Albany Road) to Roath Court, between that and Llys-du.

CWRT-TRE-GAREG (the court of the stone-built homestead, or of the homestead by the stone.) A farm in the parish of Llanedern.

CWRT-Y-FIL. An old mansion in the parish of Penarth.

CYFARCHFA (the hailing-place.) An old thatched cottage on the east bank of the river Taff, a little south of Llandaff bridge.

CYMDDA-BACH, Cymla Bach (the little common.) In the parish of Llandaff (1730.) A small thatched cottage at Llandaff Yard.

CYNDDA, or Cymdda, or Cymla Bach. A small thatched house which stood on the side of Pen-y-waun Road, on the corner of Ninian Road, by Roath Park. The name is Welsh and means "the Common." In 1653 the house was described as a messuage and land, partly common, in the manor of Llystalybont. It was blown down in a storm (1895.)

DAIRY WELL, The. A well with ancient masonry in the grounds of Llandaff Court, north of the house, at the foot of the hill.

DAME COURT. Crockherbtown (1850.)

DANIEL'S-HOOKS, "Danyell-hokes," "Danyell Hok." A piece of land in the farm of the grange in the lordship of Leckwith (1456, 1492.)

DAU-GAE-Y-GELLL (the two closes of the grove.) Fields in the parish of Llanishen (1655.)

DEANFIELD. A piece of land at Roath Court Farm, or Dean's Farm.

DEAN'S FARM. Another name for Roath Court Farm, otherwise Cwrt-bach.

DELTA PLACE. A row of small old dwelling-houses near Taicochion, or Red Houses, Roath; demolished 1899.

DERI, Y (the oaks.) Now corruptly styled "the Dairy Farm."A homestead a little north-east of Roath church. Also a tenement in or near Whitchurch, 1735.

DERWEN-DDU (black oak.) A tenement in the parish of Llanishen.

DINAS-POWYS. An ancient castle, village and manor in the Hundred of the same name, but in Saint Andrew's parish, five miles south-west from Cardiff.

DOBBIN PITS, The. A piece of land lying south-east of Cathays Grange, beyond the north end of Park Place, near the T.V.R. goods-shed and Corbett Road, on the northern outskirts of the town, but now built over. The name is probably derived from one John Dobin, who held lands in this locality in the year 1319. Sometimes it was written Daubinpitts, Daupinpitts and Dawbyngepytts (1492, 1550, 1674, 1715, 1778, 1797, 1817.) In one document it is styled Dibble Pits. Here stood the Dobbinpits Farm, until 1850. Park Place was called Dobbinpits Lane because it led to this place.

DOBBINPITS FARM lands lay in what is now the angle between the Taff Vale and Rhymney Railways.

DOBBINPITS ROAD. The old name of Park Place. This thoroughfare, in the Heath Enclosure Award of 1809, is described as "the Blind Lane leading from Crockherbtown to Dobbin Pits." It runs along the east side of Cathays Park.

"DOBSTREET." A street at Llandaff (1606.)

"DOGOWYLDESCROFT," Dogvill's Croft, Dogfield Croft. A field in the lordship of Roath (1440.) See Roath-Dogfield and Bedd-y-ci-du, with which latter this is perhaps identical.

DOWLWERN, Y (the dole alders.) Lands near Llanishen (1653.)

DOWNTON. A house in the parish of Rumney, south of Pensarn.

DRAENEN-PEN-Y-GRAIG (the thorn-tree at the end of the rock.)

A place near the northern boundary of Senghenydd and RoathKeynsham (1702.) In 1798 "Y Drainen" was described as "being the known and ancient boundary between the parishes of Eglwysilan and Llanishen." "Thorntree Hill" is an eminence on the Cefn range.

DRYING HAYS, The. An old name for the Cardiff Arms Park.

'DUC." Land in the manor of Roath-Dogfield, mentioned in a deed of circa 1200.

DUKE STREET. The thoroughfare which runs westward from North Street and Trinity Square to the north end of High Street, forming the line of communication between Queen Street and Castle Street. By the middle of the 19th century it had come to be confused with Shoemaker Street. In 1849 it was called "Duke Street otherwise Shoemaker Street." The two were, however, really distinct. Duke Street is named in documents of the 16th century, but sometimes under the form "Duck Street." Though it is supposed to derive its name from Duke Robert's imprisonment in the Castle, it may very likely have been the street in which ducks were sold.

DULAS (the blue-black stream.) A brook forming a boundary of the lordship of Roath-Keynsham. It flows through the parish of Llanedern, and empties into the river Rhymny between Lanrumney and Coed-y-gores (1702.) This name, in slightly varying forms, is found all over the Celtic region; e.g., Dowlais near Merthyr Tydfil, Daoulas in Brittany, and Douglas in Scotland.

DUMBALLS, The; the Domball. The moor-land between the river Taff and the Glamorganshire Canal, from Sowdrey to the sea (1711.) There is a Dunball Island at the mouth of the Bristol Avon. In 1752 there was a Dumball Close on Cardiff Moors, and the name occurs in 1814.

DUMBALLS ROAD. A narrow lane which led from the South Gate westwards across the West Moors towards Penarth (1839, 1864.) Since widened and called Penarth Road.

DWY-ERW-A-HANER-GENOL (the middle two and a half acres.)

A piece of land on the shore of the East Moor (1764.)

DWY-ERW-COED (the two acres of the wood.) A field in the parish of Roath (1750.)

"DWY-ERW-DONEG" (?Dwy-erw-doniog, the endowed two-acres.)

In the parish of Roath and manor of Roath-Keynsham (1702.)

DWY-ERW-SYR-HARI (Sir Henry's two acres.) In the parish of Roath (1709.)

DWY-ERW-Y-BWLKY. Two Welsh acres (four English) of land on the shore of the Splot, south of the stream which flows into the Severn at Pulkey (1764.)

DWY-ERW-Y BYRIEUWYSAU, "Dwy Erw yr Byriousa" (the two acres of the short-yoked oxen.) In Llandaff parish (1709.)

DWY-ERW-Y-GARN FACH (the two acres of the little stone-heap.) A tenement in the parish of Saint Fagan (c. 1670.)

DWY-ERW-Y-PISTYLL (the waterfall two acres.) A field at Pen-ylan (1809.)

DWY-ERW-Y-WAUN-GRON (the two acres of the round meadow.) In Llandaff parish (1709.)

DYFFRYN, Y (the dell.) A thatched farmhouse just beyond the north end of Roath Park.

EARL'S HILL, "Erleshulle." Demesne land in the manor of Rumney, referred to in a Minister's Account of 1402.

EAST FURLONG. A meadow in the lordship of Roath (1492.) In 1542 it was stated to contain 43½ acres.

EAST STREET. A name sometimes in the 18th century applied to Smith Street.

EAST WEIR, The. A fishery in the sea, in the lordship of Roath (1542.)

EASTERN HOLLOWS, The. A part of the Moors near the mouth of the river Taff (1830.)

EFAIL-Y-CASTELL (the forge of the castle.) A hamlet in the parish of Pentyrch.

EFAIL-Y-DOWST, Dusty Forge. A place a little west of the hamlet of Ely, on the Cowbridge Road (1735.)

EGLWYSILAN (the church of Saint Ilan.) An extensive parish about six miles north of Cardiff.

ELM STREET, Roath; off the north side of the Newport Road. So called from its proximity to the Four Elms.

ELROSE. A piece of land marked on Mr. J. S. Corbett's map as situate to the east of the Island, on the east side of the northeast end of Broadway, Roath; bounded on the north-east by Spring Gardens Road.

ELY. Y Lai, or Yr Elai. A river of Glamorgan, rising in the hills of Glamorgan and flowing southward between Llandaff and the Leckwith Hills, until it discharges itself into the Severn Channel a little to the east of Penarth Head. It would be both more accurate and more distinctive to spell this name Eley.

ELY COMMON FARM. An old thatched farmhouse, with a curious wooden porch, on the north side of Cowbridge Road, close to the west side of the new Park.

ELY COURT. A large house standing in its own grounds, halfway between Ely and Llandaff.

ELY FARM. An ancient homestead in the hamlet of Ely. It was the hereditary property and residence of the late George Thomas (1821–1898), a Glamorgan farmer of the old school.

ELY FOREST. A tract of uncultivated land in the parish of Llantrisant (1547.)

ELY GREEN. A piece of waste land measuring 3a. 0r. 16p., in the manor of Llandaff (1852.)

ELY RISE (1858.) A house on the east side of the road from Ely northwards to Llandaff, near the crossways and just within the Borough.

"ENORMORE." Certain pastures forming part of Griffithsmoor, in the Hundred of Cibwr (1547.)

"EROW WENSAN" (? Saint Gwensan's acre.) Arable land in the parish of Llantrisant. It was chantry-land (1548.) A place called Llanwensan, near Cardiff, is named in a Will of 1550.

ERW-BANT (the far acre.) A field in the parish of Lisvane (1597.)

ERW-DARLAND. An acre of land in Cefn-Mabli park, parcel of the manor of Roath-Keynsham (1702.)

ERW-DEILO (Saint Teilo's acre.) A piece of land held by Miles Mathew as free tenant of the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff, paying a penny a year rent. (Val. Eccl., 1535.)

ERW-DUON (the black acres.) Two plots of land, of six and eight acres, on the shore of the East Moor (1764.) J. S. C.

ERW-HYWEL-Y-COES (the acre of Howel of the leg.) A freehold tenement in the parish of Llanedern and manor of RoathKeynsham (1702.)

ERW-MAES-Y-DRE (the acre outside the town.) In the parish of Llandaff (1709.)

ERW-PEN-Y-SARN (the acre at the head of the causeway.) In the parish of Llandaff (1709.)

ERW'R-AFALLEN (the apple-tree acre.) A tenement in the parish of Saint Fagan (c. 1670.)

ERW'R-BEAM. An acre on the East Moor (1764.) J. S. C.

ERW'R-CLOCHDY (the belfry acre.) A piece of land on the shore of the East Moor (1764.) J. S. C.

ERW'R-DELYN (the harp acre.) Land on the Splot (1764.) J. S. C.

ERW'R-GROES (the acre of the cross.) A piece of land on the shore of the East Moor (1764.) J. S. C.

ERW'R-PENTRE-CAE-GWYN (the acre of the village of the white field.) Land in the hamlet of Ely (1719.)

ERW'R-POND. An acre of land in the hamlet of Ely (1719.)

ERW'R-YSCOLHAIG (the scholar's acre.) Two English acres belonging to the Chapter of Llandaff (1747.)

ERW-WAUN-Y-CYMDDA, "Erow wain y Kimtha" (the acre of the meadow of the common.) In Llandaff parish (1709.)

ERW-WEN (white acre.) Land in the parish of Lisvane. Also an acre of land on Ely Moor belonging to the Chapter of Llandaff (1721.)

ERW-YR-APOTHECARY (the apothecary's acre.) A piece of land held with Penhill in the manor of Llandaff (1852.)

ESTHAWE. A bailiwick in the lordship of Cardiff Castle (1492.)

EVANS' COURT. On the east side of the Hayes, leading to the Cock's Tower. It was demolished circa 1895.

EXTENT-LAND, "Extenlond." Divers lands and tenements in the lordship of Pentyrch were so named in 1492, because newly "extent" or scheduled.

FACTORY WOOD. In the parish of Leckwith, on the right bank of the river Ely, below the bridge.

FAIRFIELD, "ffayrefeld." Arable land in the lordship of Cardiff and Roath, referred to in a Minister's Account of 1392.

FAIROAK. Welsh Derwen-deg. A farm in the parish of Roath, on the left bank of the Nant-mawr (1785.)

FAIRWATER. A hamlet in the parish of Llandaff. Its Welsh name is Tyllgoed (holed trees.) The English name of this hamlet is given to one of the prebends of Llandaff Cathedral, which in some documents is called the Prebend of Fairwell, or Farewell.

FELIN FAWR, Y; "Velin Vaure" (the great mill.) A grist-mill in the parish of Llantrisant in the bedelry of Miscyn (1547.)

"FFOLDEYES TENEMENT." A holding in the lordship of Roath, destroyed by a flood in 1492.

FFOREST. A farm on the left bank of the river Taff, in Whitchurch parish, near Melingriffith.

FOREST-GOCH, Y (the red forest.) A portion of the uncultivated lands of Lower Senghenydd, to the north of Cardiff (1550.)

FFOREST-ISAF (the lower forest.) Lands in or near Whitchurch (1735.)

"FFOREST MAVON ELYE." A ham or pasture-land in Lower Senghenydd lordship (1547.)

FFYNON-BREN (the tree well, or Bran's well.) A spring giving its name to a picturesque thatched cottage, with a garden, on the north side of Albany Road, opposite the end of Claude Road. Demolished 1890.

FFYNON-DEILO (Saint Teilo's well.) A spring rising under the foundations of Ty-gwyn, in the city of Llandaff, on the west side of the lane which leads from the Castle down to the Cathedral. It is a large cavity, with a pool enclosed by ancient masonry. Since 1889 it has become polluted.

FFYNON-FEDW (the well by the birch-trees.) In the parish of Llanedern (1744.)

FFYNON-HOBA (Hobba's Well.) A spring or well in the parish of Llanishen, at the back of an old thatched house bearing the same name, on the west side of the Caerphilly Road. It may mean the swine's well, but more likely the name is connected with hob, an elf or goblin.

FFYNON-LLANDENIS A spring of water rising near CapelDenis, in the parish of Llanishen; formerly associated with the memory of Saint Denis and resorted to for the cure of rheumatism and sore eyes. It forms a shallow pond and is now inside the northernmost enclosure of Roath Park. (fn. 6)

FFYNON-WEN (the white well.) A small farmhouse in the parish of Whitchurch, on the west side of the road from the Holly-bush Inn towards the Cefn.

FISHDOWN. Twenty acres of demesne land in the lordship of Cogan (1492.)

FISHER'S BRIDGE. A wooden bridge which crossed the Taff at Llystalybont. In allusion to a bridge at this place the old manor-house has its name, which in English means "The Court at the Bridge End" (1770, 1818.)

FIVE ACRES, The. A piece of arable land belonging to the Treasurer's Manor of Llandaff (1649.)

FLAT HOLM, The. A small inhabited island in the Bristol Channel, lying between the coast of Glamorgan and the Steep Holm. It is 2½ miles south-east from Lavernock Point, but is accounted a portion of the parish of Saint Mary, Cardiff, and of the lordship of Glamorgan.

FLAT-HOLM SHELF. A bank east of the Flat Holm, in the Bristol Channel.

FLORIN A meadow on the right bank of the river Rhymny, near Coed-y-gores (1702.)

"FOES-LASE-VACH." A meadow in the parish of Llanedern (1702.)

FOUR ELMS LANE. A lane a mile east of Cardiff, lately windened into a street, leading east-south-east from the Newport Road to Clifton Street and Broadway, Roath. So called from four noble elms which stood between the lane and the highroad. They were felled in 1901, to widen the thoroughfare. One of the Cardiff Eisteddfodau was proclaimed under those elms, it is said.

FRESHMOOR. In the lordship of Roath. (Minister's Account, 1542.)

FROG LANE. A thoroughfare so named in Speed's map of 1610. Apparently identical with Golate. The name occurs in 1821, and is, perhaps, a variant of Porrag (i e., Porridge) Lane, one of the names for Wharton Street, whereof Golate is a western continuation.

FULFORD HENGE, The A fishery on the sea shore near the mouth of the Taff, in the lordship of Roath (1542.)

Footnotes

1 The reader is referred, for a fuller consideration of this subject, to my paper on the "Place-names of the Cardiff District." (Cardiff Nat. Hist. & Antiq. Soc. Trans., vol. xxxiii., 1900-1901.)—J. H. M.
2 In Buck's view (Vol. II., p. 68) may be seen linen spread out to dry on this piece of land.
3 Fragments of it still remain in situ.
4 The name Howel had anciently two forms, Hoel and Hiwel, both of which are represented by a difference of sound at the present day. Howel is pronounced "Hoel" in Monmouthshire.
5 It is but rarely that a place takes its name from a person. In the comparatively few cases where this has happened, the place-name usually ends in "ton" (town) in English, or, in Welsh, begins with "Tre." Families often take their names from places.
6 The name was officially given to this enclosure by the Parks Committee, at the instance of the Archivist.