Killington and Firbank

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

William Farrer & John F. Curwen (editors)

Year published

1924

Supporting documents

Pages

416-439

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Killington and Firbank', Records relating to the Barony of Kendale: volume 2 (1924), pp. 416-439. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49331 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

KILLINGTON AND FIRBANK.

The early descent of the hamlet of Firbank differs from that of Killington. The former was granted out of the demesne of the lords' of Kendale at an early period; the latter remained in the demesne some fifty years longer.

Killington appears to have been part of the demesne of the barony of Kendale until 1246. In November of that year William de Lancaster, lying sick on the bed from which he never arose, enfeoffed John de Brus, a minor and possibly a younger son of Peter de Brus, William's brother-in-law, of the manor of Killington, then worth 10 marks per annum. The feoffment appears not to have taken effect or to have been irregular, for in 1259–60 Peter de Brus, who had succeeded to a moiety of the barony of Kendale in right of his wife, Helewise de Lancaster, enfeoffed William de Pikering of the manor by the service of a pair of gilt spurs yearly, or 6d., and a 20th part of a knight's fee. From that date until shortly before 25 April, 1582, when Anne the last representative of the senior line of Pickering died, the manor continued uninterruptedly in the possession of that family. It was settled upon Francis Vaughan, the eldest son of Lady Anne Knevet's third husband, John Vaughan. In 1584–5 Francis Vaughan of Sutton-upon-Derwent, co., York, esq., conveyed the manor with the hamlet of Firbank to trustees for the use of the tenants of the manor and hamlet, and the trustees conveyed to each of the tenants their respective tenement with a proportionable part of the moors, wastes, common of pasture and other privileges, according to the amount of the customary rent paid by each, subject to the ancient quit rent of 6s. 8d. to the lord of the Marquis Fee. Francis Vaughan sold the manor house of Killington Hall to Robert Wadeson, gent., who sold it about five years later to Radcliffe Ashton of Preston, co. Lanc., gent. In 1617–8 Mr. Ashton sold it to Thomas Kitson of Warton in Kendale, gent. The subsequent descent of the Hall and demesne is described in Nicolson and Burn, vol. i, p. 264. In 1708 the Freeholders of Killington and Firbank paid 6s. 8d. rent to the Marquis Fee.

During the reign of Richard I the hamlet of Firbank was granted by Gilbert Fitz-Reinfrid to William de Arundel. In 1235 the first feoffee's son, William de Arundel, held it by the service of a 20th part of a knights' fee. Before 1246 this hamlet reverted to the chief lord and subsequently passed like Killington into the family of Pickering. It would appear therefore that Firbank was included in the feoffment made by Peter de Brus to William de Pickering, whose son Thomas held a 10th part of a fee in "Frithebanck" and Killington in 1279 of Peter de Brus. In 1406 the service recorded in respect of Killington was 6d., and in respect of Firbank, 6s. The first named rent was in lieu of a pair of gilt spurs.

1150–70 William de Lancastre I, for the soul of his son Jordan, grants to the monks of Fountains the fishery in the water of Lon called Chil. Witnesses: William the priest, Thomas son of Ulvet and Adam his son, Robert son of Lefwin and Reginald his brother, Roger de Croft, Robert the chamberlain, Wlfehil the usher, Robert Quisquis (Roberto Quoquo), Adam son of Richard, Runcin the man of Roger de Molbrai, and Tancrin; Lancaster, Chartul. of Fountains, i, 458.

1175 William de Killinton accounts for five marks due to the Crown for a default; Pipe R., 21 Henry II, p. 178.

1178 William de Killinton accounts for 10 m for an amercement because he had not prosecuted his plea; Pipe R., 75.

1179 The same William is pardoned £4 of the above amercement; ib., 25.

1186–1201 Gilbert son of Roger Fitz-Raynfray gave to William de Arundel for his service all the land between Galwaithegate and Lon by their bounds: As Seuerhbec descends into Lon, so by Seuerbec ascending to the brook which flows from Scahegilbec, so by the brook which flows from Scahegilbec ascending to the head of Scahegilbec towards Kilington, and from the head of Scahegilbec to the Winter How (Bruma hoga) above Wlvescahe, thence across to Sparhaucscahe, thence across to Galwaithegate and by Galwaithegate unto the bounds of Lambrig, Grarig and Dilacre; (fn. 1) to hold quit of forest for the 20th part of a knight's fee; Chartul. of Cockersand (Chetham Soc.), 976.

1191 William de Killington is amerced 20s. for failing to bring to court a person for whom he was surety; Pipe R., 3 Ric. I, Yorks.

1196 William de Killinton's debt of one mark is to be required in Yorkshire; ib., Cumb. and Westm., 177.

1201 Sibyl late the wife of William de Arundel appeared on the 4th day against Gilbert Fitz-Reinfrid of a plea of her reasonable dower, namely of a 20th part of a knight's fee in Duneslake; and he came not, nor did he essoin (fn. 2) himself, although he had a day by his essoiner on Tuesday before the ascension; therefore let his land be taken into the King's hands and let him be summoned to Westminster in a month after Whitsunday to answer and shew cause for his default. Curia Regis Rolls (P.R.O.) i, 472.

1201 Gilbert Fitz-Reinfrid on Tuesday before Whitsunday sought to replevy his land which had been taken into the king's hands for his default against Sibyl late the wife of William de Arundel; Gilbert puts in his place Gilbert de Lancastre. Curia Regis Rolls (P.R.O.) i, 436.

1201 Sibyl de Broc released for 20 marks to Gilbert Fitz-Reinfrid, tenant, by Gilbert de Lancastre his attorney, the 20th part of a fee in Duneselake, which she claimed in dower of the gift of William de Arundell, formerly her husband, saving the right of William son and heir of William de Arundell; Feet of F., file I, n. 2.

1220–40 Berteloth de Beckeley gave to the canons of Cockersand the land of Colpethwait [Cowperthwaite] which Simon Nadio sometime held of William de Arundel, which land William de Arundel gave by charter to Ralph de Beckeley, brother of the donor; to hold in alms, saving the King's foreign service and a niais-hawk and certain pairs of fur-gloves yearly to William de Arundel; with acquittance of pannage in the demesne wood of William de Arundel, free multure in the same William's mill and common of pasture as is contained in the said William's charter which he made to the donor's brother, Ralph de Beckeley. The words in William's charter to Ralph were: "And the said Ralph shall have for his own stock (pectunia) common of pasture everywhere with my stock"; Chartul. of Cockersand (Chetham Soc.), 970.

1230–45 William son of William de Arundel confirms the gift to the canons of Cockersand of Bartholomew de Beckeley of land given to Ralph, brother of the said Bartholomew, by William de Arundel, father of the grantor, as described above. Witnesses: Patrick [de Culwen] son of Thomas, Matthew de Redemane, Richard de Coupland, Thomas de Bethum, Richard de Preston, knights; Adam de Hoton, Thomas de Levenes, Roger Kayrus, Adam de Patton; ib., 971.

1230–45 William de Arundel gave to Lawrence son of Richard, his kinsman (cognatus), the service of Ingram de Santon of the land held of the grantor in Frethebank, and all rights which the grantor had in any lands in Kendale, to hold by doing the 20th part of a knight's fee to the grantor or his heirs; ib., 973.

1230 The plea between William de Arundell and William de Lancastre touching the making of the boundary between William de Arundel's land of Frithebank and William de Lancastre's land of the Hay in Kirkeby [in Kendal] is put in respite because William de Lancastre has left for parts beyond seas; Close R., 1230, p. 349.

1231 Trinity term. William de Lancastre was attached to answer Robert de Kyme wherefore he does not keep the agreement made between them touching £15 of rent in Ulveston yearly, until he should confer upon Robert his knight £15 of land in fee and inheritance, payment of which William has stopped for 6 years, whereby the rent is in arrears £90 and he has suffered 40 marks damages. William acknowledges the charter and that nothing has been paid, but he says that three years ago he assigned to him £15 worth of land in Killington, namely 300 acres, and Robert was willing to accept the land and it was given to him by metes and bounds and he was in seisin etc., Robert denies that any land was assigned to him or that he was contented as to 2½ marks. Judgment: Robert shall recover arrears of £88 6s. 8d. and the said damages; Curia Regis R., 109, m. 16.

Ingelard de Sainton (or Santon) held one twentieth of a fee in co. Westmorland; Testa, 412.

John de Saunton released to the canons the land in Colpethwait held by Bartholomew de Beckeley; Chartul. of Cockersand, 974.

1235 William de Arundel holds one twentieth fee of the barony of Kendal; Testa, 412 b.

1240–50 Ralph de Beckeley gave to Henry son of Roger de Kirkeby Kendale six acres land in Colpethwait, namely two acres in Brochaike-banke, two acres in the Old Flat, one acre between the road which runs from Kirkeby and the Brendebanc, and one acre between the said road and the old house with a shieling (scalinga) by the house of William le Turnur. The said Henry gave this land to St. Mary of Cockersand in return for 20s. of silver; Chartul. of Cockersand, 975.

1244 Ingeram de Stanton (recte Santon) was the attorney of William de Lancastre in a plea with Matthew de Redmain; Curia Regis R., 134, m. 1d.

1246 William de Lancastre III on his death bed enfeoffed John de Brus of the manor of Kylington, with 10 m., and committed the wardship of that land and of the said John to the prior of Coningisheved; Cal. Inq., i, 27, Lancs. Inq., pt. i, 166.

1246–50 Lawrence son of Richard, for the health of the soul of William de Lancastre, his lord, releases to the abbot and canons of Cockersand the service of a sor sparrow-hawk yearly with the fur-gloves which he used to receive from them for the land of Colpthwait; Chartul. of Cockersand, 973.

1256 Lambert de Santon, a perambulator between the lands of Peter de Brus and Walter de Lindesey in Hogayl (Hugill) and Foulbarg' and between their lands in Applethwayt and Micheleselet (Mislett) in Kendehale. See Transactions n. s. xiii, 69.

1259–60 Peter de Brus grants to William de Pykering the manor of Killington, to hold with the sauvaigne, (fn. 3) but saving to the grantor for life liberty of the chase in the said manor, except in the enclosed land, for a pair of gilt spurs and the service of one twentieth fee; with liberty to the said William to pursue the game beyond the bounds of Killington as far as the limits of that part of the forest of the Hay which belongs to William de Lindesay etc. Witnesses: John de Burton, knt., Gilbert de Berebrun, Thomas de Lancastre, Ralph de Patton, Nicholas de Ninesergh, Thomas de Derlay, Richard de Croke; Nicolson and Burn, i, 262.

1260–70 William de Pikering, for 60s., released to the canons of Cockersand the service of the land of Colpereterayt in the territory of Frethebanc of his fee; Chartul. of Cockersand, 975.

1267 Walter de Lyndesey arraignes an assize of novel disseisin against William de Pykering and others touching a tenement in Killington; Bain, Cal. of Scot. Docs., n. 2447.

1279 Thomas son of William de Pikering held one tenth fee in Frithebanck and Killington [of the heirs] of Peter de Brus; Cal. Inq., ii, 190.

1281 The knight's service of Thomas de Pykering was assigned to Margeret de Brus (alias Ros); Cal. Close R., 1281, p. 90.

William de Frithbank, a juror; Lancs. Inq., pt. i, 253.

1283 William de Frithebancke, a juror on two inquests; Lancs. Inq., pt. i., 253, 258.

1285 Thomas son of William de Pikering owes Peter de Kendale 20 m; Thomas de Craystok and Roland de Thorneburgh constituted themselves principal debtors for the said debtor; Cal. Close R., 1285, p. 353.

1293 Thomas de Pikering is amoved from office as coroner because he is intending the king's affairs with the justices in Eyre in Cumberland; Cal. Close R. 1293, p. 276.

1304 Grant to Thomas de Pikering of free warren in his demesne lands in Killington and Millehope, co. Westmorland; Cal. Chart. R., iii, 47.

1310 Thomas de Pykering holds the hamlets of Kyllington, Frethebank and le Berghes of William de Ros for one-tenth fee and renders 10d. and 1lb. pepper and 6s. for puture; Cal. Inq., v, 118.

1332 Killington. Subsidy of a fifteenth.

Sir Thomas de Pikering in goods £6
Nicholas son of Elyne " 75s.
William Bondde " 60s.
Henry son of Richard " 45s.
Ralph son of William " 30s.
William Welan " 60s.
Adam son of Mariote " 75s.
John Walker " £6
Ralph son of Adam " 45s.
William son of Roger " 45s.
Adam son of Roger " 43s. 1½d.
Sum £35 18s. 1½d., whereof to the kina 4[7s. 10½d.]; Exch. Lay Sub., 195A.

1332 Frebank. Subsidy of a fifteenth.

Nicholas Scotte in goods 30s.
John Finianson " 45s.
William de Derley " 22s. 6d.
John Ballocke " 30s.
William Qwethesparthe " 22s. 6d.
Sum £7 10s., whereof to the king 10s; ib.

1332 Thomas de Pykering, knt., acknowledges a debt of 10 m. to Robert son of Partick de Culwen; Cal. Close R. 1332, p. 617.

1336 Petition of Thomas de Pykering, son and heir of William de Pykering that, in the time of Henry III, Peter de Brus III granted in fee to the said William the manor of Kilyngton, to hold by homage and fealty, rendering yearly a pair of gilt spurs, or 6d., and that he is now disturbed in his possession thereof by the escheator on the ground that the manor was parcel of a moiety of the barony of Kirkeby in Kendale. The king in consideration of the time at which the alienation was made has pardoned the trespass herein and granted licence to the said Thomas to retain the manor. Fine 40s; Cal. Pat. R. 1336, p. 280.

1370 Respite to James de Pykeryngge, knt., of the payment of £20 fine in which he was lately amerced when under sheriff of Westmorland; Cal. Close R. 1370, p. 178.

Received of John de Elvies (?) and others for tithe of Kilington, nine sieves, two windles, £4 18s. 8d; Roll at Levens.

1379 Grant to James de Pykeryng, knt., and John de Yorke, in aid of the bridge of Strangerwaith over the water of Lone, of pontage for 3 years from things saleable coming from the priory of Hornby to the bridge called "Lonesbrig" over Tybay, co. Westmorland; Cal. Pat. R. 1379, p. 354.

1406 Thomas de Pickeringe who died 25 August, 1406, held at his death the manor of Killington of John de Par, one of the lords of Kendale, by homage and fealty and for 6d. rent; it is worth £8; also the hamlet of Frethebanke of the same John for 6s. rent, worth 100s. yearly. John his son, aged 21, is his next heir; Chan. Inq. p.m., 7 Hen. IV, n. 27.

1420 John Pickeringe held at his death on 23 March, 1420, the manor of Killington with the hamlet of Frethbanke, worth 20 marks yearly, of Thomas Par by homage and the service of 12d. yearly, as of his manor of Kirkeby in Kendale. James Pickeringe, his son, aged six years at the Decollation of St. John the Baptist last, is his next heir; Chan, Inq. p.m., 8 Hen. V, n. 82. See Old Hutton, vol. i, pp. 188, 189.

1420 Inquisition taken at Kirkeby in co. Westmorland on Saturday next after the feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle, 8 Henry V, 15 June 1420, before Robert Crakenthorp the King's Escheator in cos. Cumberland and Westmorland, by the oath etc. who say that:

John Pikeryng deceased did not die seised in his demense as of fee of any lands or tenements, rents or services in co. Westmorland in demesne, or in service held of the King in chief, or of any others, but they say that he was once seised in his demesne as of fee of the manors of Killyngton, Frethbank, Aldhoton with le Bleec and with Uluay and Methorp, and long before his death, by his charter dated 12 June, 3 Henry V, (1415) granted and confirmed the said manors to Peter del Hay, Thomas Urswyke, John Carleton rector of the church of Escrik and Henry Randoffe. To have and to hold to them their heirs and assigns of the chief lords of those fees by the services therefor due and accustomed for ever. By virtue of which grant Peter, Thomas, John and Henry were seised thereof and still continue their estate therein and take the profits.

The manor of Killyngton with Frethbank a hamlet of that manor are worth yearly clear 20 marks. The said manor and hamlet are held of Thomas Par by homage and service of 12d. yearly for all services as of his manor of Kirkeby in Kendale. The manor of Aldehoton and le Blee' is worth yearly clear £10 and is held of John duke of Bedford, in socage by service of 1d. yearly only for all services. The manor of Methorp with Ulvay is worth yearly clear 10 marks and is held of John de Bethum, "chivaler," as of his manor of Bethum in socage by service of 2s. only for all services. (fn. 4)

John Pikeryng died 23 March last (1419-20) and James Pikeryng is his son and nearest heir and he was aged six years on the feast of Beheading of St John Baptist last (29 Augt 1419). Excheq. Enrolment of Inquisitions, n. 491.

1451 Rental of Cockersand. Colpertwayte: Richard Beke holds a close called Colpertwayte for 100s. rent; Chartul. of Cockersand, 1298.

1461 The same entry as the last.

1501 Cockersand Rental. Colparthwayte: Richard Bek, William Dyconson and the wife of Richard Robynson hold the whole of Colparthwayte for £4 rent; ib., 1299.

1527–8 Title of James Pykeryng, esq., brother and heir male of Christopher Pykeryng, knt., deceased, to the manors of Kyllyngton and Thurbank (sic), entailed to the heirs male of his ancestors; 19 Henry VIII; Cal. of Anct. Deeds, IV, a. 6485.

1537 Rental of Cockersand. Colparthayt: Richard Bekke holds lands there for 40s. rent; William Deconson and after his decease Miles Bekke holds land for 20s. rent; the wife late of Richard Robynson and after her decease Richard Robynson holds land there for 20s. rent. Chartul. of Cockersand, 1299.

1548 James Pykeryng, esq., passed by fine to Anne Knevytt, widow, the manors of Kyllyngton, Frethebanke, Old Hutton and le Bleae and tenements in the same places; Feet of Fines, Easter term, 2 Edw. VI.

1574 In the rental and survey of the lands late of the marchioness of Northampton, dated 7th September, 16 Elizabeth, we note that the heir of Christopher Pikering, knt. holds certain lands in Killington as of the castle of Kendal and pays yearly a free rent of 6s. 8d. also that Anthony Knipe holds land in Firbank (? Fairbank) and pays yearly a free rent of 7s. 6d. Excheq. Special Commissions, Westmorland, n. 3130.

1610 Inquest taken at Orton 24 Septr, 8 James. (1610) before Christopher Woodd esq., Escheator by the oath of Thomas Wharton esq., Randolph Washington, George Loughe, Robert Backhns, Christopher Crakinthorpp, gentlemen, Edward Harreson, Richd Nevison, Leonard Birkbeck, Tho Gibson, Robt Holme, John Harreson, and James Ward, yeomen, who say that:

William Baynes, yeoman on the day he died was seised of one messuage and tenement in Killington and six acres land thereto belonging; and one tenement in Hedgholme within the vill of Manserghe once parcel of the manor of Rigmaddin and 12 acres land thereto belonging. Tenements in Killington and Hedgholme held of the Castle of Kendall by homage and service of one penny yearly for all services etc., and are worth yearly clear 20s.

William Baynes died 24 August 1603 and Adam Baynes is his son and nearest heir and he is aged 12 years and more. Jane Baynes widow of said William has taken profits from time of his death until now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 675, n. 117.

1610 Inquest taken at Kirkby Kendall 6 Octr., 8 James I. (1610) before Christopher Wood esq., Escheator, by the oath of Geoffrey Sigswicke, Anthony Garnet, Geoffrey Borrett, James Ward, Thomas Thekeston, Christopher Mawson, Anthony Gilpinge, Robt Jopson, gentlemen, Peter Berkett, Richard Banebrigge, Edward Conder, Randulph Holme, Thomas Gilpinge and George Banebrigge, yeomen, who say that:

Michael Sharpe on the day he died was seised of two tenements in Killington and 16 acres of land thereto belonging. Held of the Castle of Kentdall by homage and service of one penny yearly for all services and are worth yearly clear 20s. He died 3 January 1603 (1603-4) and Joseph Sharpe is son and nearest heir and he is aged 26 years now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 675, n. 120.

1610 Inquest taken at the Borough of Kirkby Kentdall 6 Octr, 8 James I. (1610) before Christopher Woodd esq., Escheator, by the oath of the same jurors as last, who say that: Adam Fawcet, yeoman, on the day he died was seised of a messuage and tenement in Firthbancke and 14 acres of land thereto belonging. The premises are held of the Castle of Kendall by homage and service of one penny for all services and are worth yearly clear 5s.

Adam Fawcett died 26 May 1601 and Brian Fawcet is his son and nearest heir and he is aged 16 years and more now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 676, n. 132.

1615 Inquest taken at Kirkby Kendall 25 August, 13 James I. (1615) before Roger Otwaye, Escheator, by the oath of Robert Phillipson, Samuel Knype, Arthur Wilson, James Strickland, William Collinson, Edward Harlinge, Robert Wadeson, Brian Walker, John Tayler, Roger Bateman, Nicholas Cocke, Robert Wilson, Christopher Bainbrigg and Robert Wilkinson, who say that:

Richard Borrett was seised of one messuage and tenement in Killington called Townehouses and 20 acres of land thereto belonging; and one messuage and 15 acres of land, 2 acres of wood at Greenham in Killington. So seised he died. The premises called "Townehouses" and lands thereto belonging and the premises at Greenham are parts and parcels of Killington which is held of the king as of his castle of Kendall called "le Marques Fee" by homage fealty and a rent of 6d. for all services and are worth yearly clear 20s.

Richard Borrett died 22 January, 10 James I. (1612–3) and Geoffrey Borrett is his son and nearest heir aged 29 years now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol, vol. 676, n. 133.

1615 Inquest taken at Kirkby Kendall, 25 August, 13 James I (1615), before Roger Otwaie, Escheator.

Robert Heblethwaite was seised of a messuage and tenement in Killington and 50 acres of arable land, meadow and pasture thereto belonging in Killington, and one cottage and garden in Killington and one close called "le Stone parke" in Killington containing 200 acres of land.

So seised he sold 3 parts of the said close, in four to be divided, to Brian Walker, Edward Eland, and James Baynes of Killington, yeomen their heirs and assigns, conditionally and with a clause of redemption, which three parts of the said close before the said Robert's death and before the day of redemption by Robert's assent were redeemed by Henry Heblethwaite son and heir of said Robert, and so the said Henry, before his father's death and until now was and is seised of the three parts of the close so sold.

They further say that Robert Heblethwaite, by his charter dated 4 January, 2 James I. (1604–5) enfeoffed James Bailiffe and John Stainbancke their heirs and assigns of all and singular other the premises to the use of him the said Robert for his life and after his death one-third part of the premises to the use of his wife Agnes and the two other parts together with the reversion of all and singular the premises to the use of the said Henry Heblethwaite, his eldest son, and his heirs for ever.

The Jury say Agnes is still living, and that the messuage and tenement and the cottage and close called Stone Parke and other the premises are parts and parcels of Killington which is held of the king as of his Castle of Kendall called "le Marques Fee" by homage, fealty and a rent of six-pence for all services and that the said premises being parts and parcels of the manor of Killington pay part and portion of the rent aforesaid and are worth yearly clear 32s.

Robert Heblethwaite died 7 March last (1614–15) and Henry Heblethwaite is his son and nearest heir and he is aged 33 years now. Court of Wards Inq. p.m., vol. 53, n. 54.

1615 Inquest taken at Kirby Kendall 29 Decr, 13 James I, (1615) before Roger Otwaye esq., Escheator, by the oath of John Warde, George Baynbrigg, Nicholas Layfeild, Edward Condor, James Garnett, Edward Becke, Peter Birkett, Geoffrey Holme, William Garnett, James Parke, Anthony Gilpin, Thomas Atkinson, Nicholas Cocke, Miles Williamson and Thomas Gilpin, who say that:

John Mealbancke was seised of one messuage and tenement and 30 acres of land thereto belonging in Killington. The said premises are parts and parcels of Killington which manor is held of the king as of his Castle of Kendall called "le Marques Fee" by homage, fealty and a rent of six-pence for all services and are worth yearly clear 26s. 8d. He died 4 Novr, 13 James I (1615) and John Mealbanck is his son and nearest heir and he is aged 23 years and more now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 675, n. 128.

1618 Inquest taken at Kirkbilonsdall 22 Octr, 16 James I, (1618) before Roger Otway esq., Escheator, by the oath of Christopher Bainebrigg, John Ewan, Leonard Gibson, Robert Harrlinge, Thomas Usconson, James Garrnet, William Bowerdall, Nicholas Garnett, Thomas Fawcett, John Grene, and Nicholas Corney who say that:

William Robinson was seised on the day he died of one messuage and tenement in Firbanke and 23 acres of land thereto belonging. So seised he died 23 June, 15 James I, (1617). The premises were then and they are now held of Charles, Prince of Wales as of his Castle of Kendall called "le Marques Fee" in free socage and a free rent of one-penny for all services and are worth yearly clear 10s. Richard Robinson is his son and heir aged nine years now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 676, n. 156.

1621 Inquest taken at the town of Kirkbie Lonsdale 22 Oct, 19 James I, (1621) before Joseph Boothe gentleman, Escheator, by the oath of Thomas Garnett, Edmund Blande, George Bainbrigg, Robert Harlinge, William Bowerdale, Richard Geslinge, Thomas Witton, Geoffrey Holme, Thomas Stonson, Nicholas Garnet, John Tailor, John Ackrigge, John Garnett, who say that:

Miles Rogerson long before his death was seised in his demesne as of fee of one messuage and tenement in Firbanke and divers lands thereto belonging. So seised he by his will dated 29 October 1618, shewn to jurors, bequeathed the premises to Edmund Stayneton his nephew, his sister's son, and his heirs for ever. Miles Rogerson died 31 Decr last (1620). The premises are held of Charles, Prince of Wales as of his manor of Kendall called "Marques Fee" by fealty and a rent of one-penny yearly for all services and are worth yearly clear 6s. 8d.

He died 31 December last (1620) and Edmund Stayneton is his nephew and next heir namely son of Agnes elder sister of the said Miles and is aged 26 years and more now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 626, n. 8.

1623 Inquest taken at Aplebie 10 Sept., 21 James I. (1623) before Robert Curwen gentleman, Feodary of co. Westmorland, James Bradley and Robert Crosfeild, gentlemen, commissioners of the king, by the oath etc., who say that:

Walter Storye, yeoman, on the day of his death was seised of one messuage or tenement at Skeethill (sic) and seven acres of land, three acres meadow, four acres pasture in Killington, formerly parcel of the lands and tenements of one Thomas Pickeringe, knight, in Killington then being parcel of his manor of Killington. The messuage or tenement and land in Killington are held of Charles, Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall and York, Earl of Chester as of his manor of Kirkebye Kendall now called "Marques Fee" by knight service, homage, fealty and a rent of two gilt spurs or six-pence yearly for all services and are worth yearly clear 5s. 10d.

So seised Walter Storye died on 25 November, 1620, and John Storye is son and next heir and he is aged eleven years, four months, twenty-two days now, and William Story has received the issues and profits of all the premises since the death of Walter Storye until now but by what title, how or why the Jurors know not. Court of Wards Inq. p.m., vol. 68; n. 80.

1624 Inquest taken at Kirkby Kendall 9 Octr, 22 James I, (1624) before Roger Otway esq., escheator, by the oath of Charles Benson, Henry Kitchin, Anthony Ward, Thomas Burton, William Garnet, Thomas Maskew, William Walker, Henry Ingersone, James Forrest, Thomas Robinson, Alan Stephenson, Thomas Wilsone and Rowland Glover, who say that:

Edward Cooke, yeoman, on the day he died was seised of one messuage and tenement in Killington and 20 acres of land thereto belonging. Premises were held and are held of Charles, Prince of Wales as of his manor of Kendall called le Marques Fee, by knight service namely one hundredth part of a knight's fee and a rent, and are worth yearly clear 10s.

Edward Cooke died 21 December last (1623) and Robert Cooke is his son and heir aged 23 years now. Chan. Inq. p.m., ser. ii., vol. 668, n. 260.

1624 Inquest taken at Kendall 9 Oct., 22 James I, (1624) before Roger Otway esq., escheator, by the oath of the same jurors as above, who say that:

Robert Wadesone, yeoman, on the day he died was seised of two messuages and tenements in Killington and 60 acres of land to the said messuages belonging. So seised he on 19 June 1623 by his will bequeathed to James Wadesone his son and heir the messuage and tenement at Stangerthwait, and to John Wadeson his second son the messuages and tenement at.......Will shewn to Jurors. The said premises were held and now are held of Charles Prince of Wales as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marques Fee" by knight service, namely, one-hundredth part of a knight's fee and a rent, and are worth yearly clear 20s.

Robert Wadeson died 23 June 1623 and James Wadeson is his son and heir aged 30 years and upwards now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 668, n. 261.

1624 Inquest taken at Kirkby Kendall 9 Oct., 22 James I, (1624) before Roger Otway, gentleman, escheator, by the oath of the same jurors as last, who say that:

Guilbert Atkinsone on the day he died was seised of two messuages and tenements in Killington and 18 acres of land to the said messuages belonging. The premises were and are held of Charles, Prince of Wales as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marques Fee" by knight service, namely one-two-hundredth part of a knight's fee and a rent, and are worth yearly clear 13s. 4d.

Gilbert Atkinson died 30 January last (1623–4) and Robert Atkinsone is his son and heir, aged 22 years and upwards now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 668, n. 262.

1624 Inquest taken at Kendall 9 Oct., 22 James I, (1624) before Roger Otway esquire, escheator, by the oath of the same jurors as above, who say that:

Joseph Sharp, yeoman, on the day of his death was seised of two messuages and tenements in Killington and 16 acres of land, meadow and pasture in Killington to them belonging. The said premises are held of Charles, Prince of Wales as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marques Fee" by the two-hundredth part of one knight's fee and are worth yearly clear 10s.

Joseph Sharp died......mo die Novembris ultim...." (1623) and. . . . . . . . . . . . Sharpe is son and. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . now. . . . . . . years and 10 months. Court of Wards Inq. p.m., vol. 100, n. 57. (fn. 5)

1624 Inquest taken at Kirkby Kendall 9 Oct., 22 James I, (1624) before Roger Otway, esquire, escheator, by the oath of the same jurors as last, who say that:

Adam Cooke, yeoman, on the day of his death was seised of two messuages or tenements, 16 acres of land, four acres of meadow, 10 acres of pasture in Killington in his own tenure and possession, and of two closes of land in Killington containing by estimation 6 acres of land; and of five other messuages or tenements and 20 acres of land, five acres of meadow, 15 acres of pasture in Killington in the tenure or occupation of divers customary tenants who claim several estates to them and their heirs by several rents and services therefor yearly to be rendered.

So seised as above-said, Adam Cooke on 27 October last (1623) made his will and thereby bequeathed to Robert Cooke, his second son and his heirs that messuage and tenement at Myerside in Killington charged with the payment of £40 to Elizabeth Cooke, Mabel Cooke, Ellin Cooke and Dorothy Cooke, the four daughters of Adam, by equal portions; and to Edward Cooke, his son and heir, the two closes aforesaid charged with the payment of £40 to the aforesaid four daughters; and to the said Edward Cooke and his heirs all his other messuages and tenements in Killington, as by the will, shewn to Jurors, more fully, amongst other things, appears. The premises late in tenure of Adam and all the other premises above specified in tenure of customary tenants all of which once were parcel of the lands and tenements of Thomas Pickeringe, knight, deceased, then being parcel of the manor of Killington, are held of Charles, Prince of Wales as of his manor of Kirkby Kendall called "le Marques Fee" by one-hundredth part of one knight's fee and by a rent of . . . . . . . . yearly and they are worth yearly 20s. clear.

Of said estate Adam died seised on 31 October last, 1623, and Edward Cooke is son and next heir aged now 13 years 20 days and no more. And Dorothy Cooke late the wife of Adam still lives at Killington. Escheator's Inquisn p.m., ser. ii, file 1225, n. 9. See footnote to the last inquisition.

1628 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 23 Sepr., 4 Charles I. (1628) before Henry Cowper, esq., escheator, by the oath of Anthony Knipe, Henry Feild, gentlemen, Allan Stevenson, Thomas Brigges, Adam Shepherde, Robert Harlinge, Henry Garnett, Edward Harlinge, Edmond Garnett, James Hardie, Christopher Phillipson, William Jeninges, John Birkett, Charles Johnson, John Jackson and William Hodgson, yeomen, who say that:

Robert Hilton, yeoman, was seised on the day he died of two messuages and tenements in Killington and six acres of land in Killington and six acres of common pasture to said messuages and lands belonging. Premises held of king as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marquesse Fee" by knight service and are worth yearly clear 2s.

Robert Hilton died 10 Decr, I Charles I, (1625) and Richard Hilton now of Killington is his son and nearest heir aged 30 years now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 709, n. 213.

1628 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 14 Novr, 4 Charles I, (1628) before Henry Cowper esq, escheator, by the oath of John Pearson, Henry Feild, Thomas Brigges, Allan Stephenson, Miles Williamson, Roger Bateman, Rowland Bateman, Adam Shepheard, Roger Ayrey, Christopher Phillipson, Randall Blaymire, William Helme and John Benson, who say that:

Adam Baynes long before his death and on the day of his death was seised of one capital messuage in Killington and 12 acres of land, three acres meadow, six acres pasture thereto belonging. So seised he died about 11 August, 22 James I, (1624). The premises then were held of Charles, Prince of England, as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marquesse Fee" and now are held of King Charles, in like manner, by knight service but by what part of a knight's fee they know not, and are worth yearly clear 20s.

Adam Baynes of Killington is kinsman (consang) and next heir of said Adam Baines deceased and is aged 28 years and more now. And the said Adam Baynes of Killington and Issabella Baynes late the wife of James Baynes, father of the said Adam Baines deceased, have received the profits of the premises from the time of his death until now, but by what title etc., the Jurors know not. Chanc. Inq. p. m., ser.ii, vol. 709, n. 186.

1628 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 14 Novr, 4 Charles I, (1628) before Henry Cowper, esquire escheator, by the oath of the same jurors as last, who say that:

Edmond Walker, yeoman, long before his death was seised of five acres of land in Firbancke and by his will dated 7 Feb. 1623 (1623–4) bequeathed the said land to Issabella his wife for her life. Moreover he, by his said will bequeathed the said land to Alice his daughter now wife of Miles Towneson and her heirs for ever after her mother's death. Will shewn to Jurors.

Edmond Walker died 10 Feb. 1623 (1623–4). At the time of his death the land was held of Charles then Prince of England as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marquesse Fee" and now is held of King Charles as of said manor and fee by fealty and a free rent of one-penny yearly in free socage for all services and is worth yearly clear 4s.

Alice now wife of Miles Towneson is daughter and next heir of said Edmond Walker and she is aged 30 years and upwards now. And Isabella wife of the said Edmond Walker is still living, at Killington, and receives the profits of the land according to the tenor of the will, but by what title, why and how the jurors know not. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 707, n. 73.

1628 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 14 Novr, 4 Charles I, (1628) before Henry Cowper esq., escheator, by the oath of the same jurors as last, who say that:

Richard Stainebancke, yeoman, long before and on the day of his death was seised of four acres of land in Firbanck and so died seised on 20 April 3 Charles I, (1627). Premises held of king as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marquesse Fee" namely by fealty and a free rent of one-penny yearly payable in free socage for all services and are worth yearly clear 4s.

John Stainebancke is his son and next heir aged 46 years and more now and he has received the profits of the premises from the time of his father's death until now but by what title etc., they know not. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 709, n. 151.

1629 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 28 August, 5 Charles I, (1629) before John Cowper, esq., escheator, by the oath of Thomas Brigges, William Helme, William Hodgson, Christopher Phillipson, John Birkehead, William Potter, William Jenninges, Henry Becke, gentlemen, Roger Ayrey, Thomas Dixon, Richard Speight, John Powe and Nicholas Cocke, yeomen, who say that:

James Bainebrigge, yeoman, long before his death was seised in his demesne as of fee of one messuage or tenement in Firbancke and six acres of land and meadow, 12 acres pasture there, to said messuage belonging. So seised he, by his charter 1 May, 14 James I, (1616) granted the premises to his son and heir apparent Richard Bainebrigge and his heirs to the use of the said Richard his heirs and assingns for ever. Charter shewn to Jurors. The premises were held at the time of his death of King James as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marquesse Fee" and now are held of King Charles, in like manner, in free socage and by a yearly rent of one penny for all services and are worth yearly clear 9s.

James Bainebrigge died 7 January 1617–18 and Richard Bainebrigge is his son and next heir aged 48 years and more now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 713, n. 192.

1631 Inquest taken at Kirkbiekendall 29 April, 7 Charles I, (1631) before Henry Harrison, gentleman, escheator, by the oath of Anthony Warde, Thomas Wilson, John Moore, Adam Shepparde, gentlemen, Rowland Gibson, Miles Siss, John Brigges, Miles Williamson, William Potter, Richard Ward, John Jackson, Giles Speight, Edward Sutton, Ranulf Blaymier, yeomen, who say that:

Edmund Walker long before his death and on the day of his death was seised of a moiety of a messuage or tenement called "le Woodheade" in Firrbancke in his own possession, and of the other moiety in reversion after the death of Richard Walker his father, and eight acres of land, four acres meadow, eight acres pasture in Firbancke to the said messuage belonging; and three closes of land called "le Holmes" containing by estimation six acres in reversion after the death of his said father Richard. And long before his death the said Edmund Walker was seised of one messuage or tenement called "Bruntgill," lately purchased from Edmund Howgill, in Firrbancke, and four acres of land and meadow, two acres pasture thereto belonging. So seised he by one Indenture dated 9 January, 6 Charles I, (1630–1) granted the messuage called "Bruntgill" to John Fawcett of Stonehall in Sedbergh co. York, yeoman, Richard Thistlthwait of Hakera in Dente co. York, yeoman, and Thomas Sutton of Moores in Firrbancke co. Westmorland, yeoman, their heirs and assigns to their use for ever.

Edmund Walker died 15 January last (1630–1).

The said messuages, land, meadow, pasture and other the premises in Firrbancke held of the king as of his manor of Kendall called "Marques Fee" in free socage by fealty and a free rent of one-penny yearly for all services and they are worth yearly clear 6s. 8d. Richard Walker is son and next heir of said Edmund Walker and he is aged 10 years, six months, 14 days now. Issabella Walker widow, late the wife of said Edmund Walker, is still alive and is living at Wood Head in Firrbancke. Chan. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 712, n. 124.

1633 Inquest taken at Kirkby Kendall 31 August, 9 Charles I, (1633) before Richard Branthwait gentleman, escheator, by the oath of Christopher Lancaster, Henry Backhouse, Thomas Wilson, Henry Heblethwaite, John Smith, Henry Fisher, Adam Sheppard, Thomas Baines, James Wadeson, Robert Cooke, Edmond Newby, Randall Blaymire, James Audland, John Whalley and Robert Chamber, who say that:

Miles Robinson of Hye House, Firbank, yeoman, long before and on the day he died was seised of a messuage, 15 acres of land, eight acres meadow, 10 acres pasture in Firbancke and died 5 Novr last (1632). Premises held of king as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marques Fee" in free socage by fealty and a rent of two-pence for all services and are worth yearly clear 20s.

Richard Robinson is brother and next heir of said Miles and is aged 40 years and upwards now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 727, n. 138.

1634 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 11th June, 10 Charles I. (1634) before Roger Otwaye, gentleman, escheator, by the oath etc., who say that:

William Walker, yeoman, long before his death was seised of a moiety of one messuage or tenement called "Harperigge" in Killington in his own tenure and of the other moiety thereof in reversion after the death of Brian Walker his father and of 10 acres of land, 10 acres of meadow, eight acres of pasture at Harperigge and of four acres of pasture in a close called "Gilsmoore" in Killington to the said messuage belonging and therewith usually occupied; and of one moiety of three acres of land, three acres of meadow, five acres of pasture in Hegholme in his own tenure and of the other moiety thereof in reversion after the death of his said father; and of one moiety of four acres of pasture of the yearly rent or fee farm of 3s. 4d. in a close called "Gilsmoore" in Old Hutton in his own tenure and of the other moiety thereof in reversion after the death of his said father.

William Walker thus seised by his charter quadripartite dated 16 Decr, 9 Charles I, (1633) "did covenaunt, declare and agree to and with William Fairer of Crosbiebancke in the said county of Westmorland, gentleman, and Bryan Walker of Harperigge in Killington aforesaid, father of the said William Walker, theire heires and assigns and all other person and persons which are or shall be seised or have any estate of inheritance of and in the said severall landes above mencioned shall stand and bee seised of all and every part and parcell thereof to the only uses intentes, purposes and limitacions hereafter mencioned limited, appointed and declared and to noe other uses, intentes and limitacions whatsoever, that is to say, the moietie and one halfe of all and singuler the said messuage and tenement in Killington aforesaid and all other the landes hereditamentes and premisses with thappurtenaunces thereunto belonginge and the moiety and halfe of the said landes tenementes and hereditamentes in Hegholme and Old Hutton aforesaid to the use of the said Bryan Walker the father for and dureinge the terme of his naturall life according to the estate by him formerly reserved therein and the other moietie togeather with the revercion and revercions remainder and remainders of all and singuler the said premisses to the use of the said William Walker for and dureinge the terme of his naturall life without impeachment of wast and after the severall deceases of the said Bryan and William Walker a third parte in three partes to be divided to the use of Barbarie his wife for and dureinge the terme of her naturall life and for and in recompence of her jointure and dower and the other twoe partes togeather with the revercion and revercions remainder and remainders to the use of my sonne William [? Bryan] Walker, Isabell, Marie, Margret, and Elizabeth for and dureinge the terme of nyne years for their educacion and maintenance and after to the onely use and behoofe of the said Bryan Walker the sonne his heires and assignes for ever." The charter shewn to jurors.

So seised William Walker died 16 April last (1634) and Bryan Walker is son and next heir of the said William Walker deceased and he was aged at the time of his father's death 13 years five months, two days.

The messuage and tenement land, meadow and pasture in Killington are held of the king as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marquesse Fee" by knight service and are worth yearly clear 11s. 6d. And the land meadow and pasture in Hegholme are held of the king in socage by a yearly free rent of sevenpence as parcel of the lands late of St. John of Jerusalem. And the four acres of pasture in Oldhutton are held of the king as of his manor of Kendall called " le Richmond Fee" by fealty and a yearly free rent of 3s. 4d. in socage and are worth yearly clear 3s. 4d.

Barbara late the wife of the said William Walker deceased now is living in pure widowhood at Kendall. Court of Wards Inq. p.m., vol. 86, n. 150.

1635 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 11 Decr., 11 Charles I, (1635) before Henry Cowper, gentleman, escheator, by the oath etc., who say that:

Anthony Ward, yeoman, on the day he died was seised of a messuage or tenement called "Davybancke" in Firbancke; and of one water grain mill in Firbancke lately purchased from Richard Ward; and of 14 acres of land, six acres of meadow, 40 acres of pasture in Firbancke to the said messuage or tenement belonging and therewith usually occupied. And of a messuage or tenement called "le Whynney Hawe" in Firbancke lately purchased from Roland Dawson; and of 14 acres of land, four acres of meadow, 40 acres of pasture in Firbancke to the said messuage or tenement called "le Whynney Hawe" belonging and therewith usually occupied. And of two messuages or tenements in Dillacre; and of 10 acres of land, 10 acres of meadow, 10 acres of pasture in Dillacre to the said messuages or tenements in Dillacre belonging. And of two inclosures in Dillacre called "le parockes" containing 1½ acres of meadow. And of one yearly white rent or rent-seck (fn. 6) of £6 13s. 4d. issuing from a messuage or tenement in Cowperthwaite lately purchased from Robert Nicholson.

So seised Anthony Warde on 11 March 1633 (1633–4) made his will and by it bequeathed the messuage called "Davybancke" in Firbancke, the water corn mill and other lands at "Davibanke," which he lately purchased from "Richard Warde my brother," to his eldest son Edmund Ward and heirs of his body to enter thereon when 21 years of age, and for default of such issue to his youngest son Anthony Warde and heirs of his body, and for default of such issue to his second son Richard Ward and heirs of his body, and for default of such issue to his third son Robert Ward and heirs of his body, and for default of such issue to his own right heirs for ever; and his messuage tenement and lands at "Whynney Hau" in Firbancke, which he purchased from Roland Dawson, to his wife Hellen for life and after her decease to his youngest son Anthony Ward and heirs of his body "soe as my said landes at Davybanke doe not fall to him by the death of my said sonne Edmonde, and if they doe for default of issue of the body of my said sonne Anthony then I give and bequeath my said tenement and land att Whynney Haw to the said Richard Ward and Robert Ward my two sonnes equallie to be devided betweene them and the heirs of their bodies lawfully to be begotten and for default of such issue then to my right heirs for ever"; and his two messuages and tenements and two parockes in Dillacre to his son Richard Ward and heirs of his body, and for default of such issue to his son Robert Ward and the heirs of his body, and for default of such issue to his own right heirs for ever; and his yearly rent of £6 13s. 4d. issuing from his messuage in Cowperthwaite to his son Robert Ward and heirs of his body, and for default of such issue to his son Richard Ward and the heirs of his body, and for default of such issue to his own right heirs for ever. Will shewn to Jurors.

Anthony Ward died 9 January, 10 Charles I, (1634–5). Premises called "Davybanke" and "Whynney Hawe," the mill, and all the lands etc. in Firbancke are held of the king as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marquess Fee" in free soccage by a yearly free rent of 4d. and are worth yearly clear 50s. And the premises in Dillacre are held of the king as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marquess Fee" in free soccage by a yearly rent of 2d. and are worth yearly clear 10s. Edmund Ward is his son and next heir, aged now 15 years; and Helen relict of the said Anthony is living, a widow, at Whynney Hawe. Court of Wards Inq. p.m., vol. 87, n. 185.

1636 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 10 June, 12 Charles I, (1636) before Henry Harrison, gentleman, escheator, by the oath of Francis Sisson, Henry Feild, Rowland Gibson, John Bainebrigge, Robert Harrison, James Waidson, Miles Williamson, William Jeninges, John Jackson, John Brigges, gentlemen, John Whalley, John Taylor, William Helme, Robert Robinson, Robert Walker and George Barker, yeomen, who say that:

Rowland Atkinson, yeoman, long before his death and on the day he died was seised of a messuage or tenement called "le Newfeild" at Newfeild in Firrbancke and six acres of land, 4 acres meadow, 20 acres pasture in Firrbancke therewith usually occupied and died so seised 28 April last (1636). Premises held of the king as of his manor of Kirkbie Kendall called "le Marquess Fee" in free socage and are worth yearly clear 13s. 4d. Anthony Atkinson is his son and next heir, aged 26 years and upwards now. Chanc. Inq. p.m., ser. ii, vol. 735, n. 84.

1636 Inquest taken at Kirkbie Kendall 10 June, 12 Charles I, (1636) before Henry Harrison, gentleman, escheator, by the oath etc, who say that:

Edward Sutton, yeoman, on the day he died was seised of a messuage or tenement called "Rustbrigges" in Firrbancke and of 10 acres of land, 10 acres of meadow, 20 acres of pasture in Firrbanck thereto belonging and usually occupied therewith; and of five acres of land, meadow and pasture in Firrbancke lately purchased from Josiah Dawson. The premises are held of the king as of his manor of Kirkby Kendall called "le Marquesse Fee" in free soccage by fealty and by a free rent of 1d. yearly, and are worth yearly clear 13s.

Edward Sutton died on 12 March last (1635–6) and Anthony Sutton is his son and next heir and he is aged 13 years now. Court of Wards Inq. p.m., vol. 88, n. 9.

1639 Inquest taken at Milthropp 16 Octr., 15 Charles I. (1639) before Henry Bellingham knight and baronet, Robert Curwen gentleman, the king's feodary for co. Westmorland and William Knipe gentleman, the king's commissioners, by the oath etc., who say that:

Thomas Kytson, gentleman, on the day of his death was seised of a capital messuage called "Killington Hall" and of 40 acres of arable land, 20 acres of meadow, 100 acres of pasture, 100 acres of moss furze and heath in Killington called "Killington demesne" belonging to the capital messuage; and of one other messuage and 16 acres of land, meadow and pasture now parcel of Killington demesne in Killington to the said messuage belonging; and of a water grain mill called "Bondsholme Mill" in Killington.

Thomas Kytson was likewise seised on the day he died of a capital messuage and garden in Warton in co. Lancaster in his own tenure; and of 15 other small messuages or burgages and 15 gardens and tofts thereto belonging in the tenure of divers customary tenants thereof in Warton; and of a parcel of arable land containing two acres in the tenure of John Cuminge; and of another parcel of arable land containing two acres now or late in the tenure of John Towminge, (? Cuminge) in Warton; and also of II acres of land, meadow and pasture called "Bartherome" in Carneford otherwise Carnforth in co. Lancaster; and also of three other small messuages or tenements and 13 acres of land meadow and pasture thereto belonging in Lindall in the parish of Warton co. Lanc., in the several tenures of divers customary tenants thereof.

So seised, Thomas Kytson by his will in writing dated 10 Feb., last (1638–9) bequeathed to his son Thomas the demesne of Killington to have and to hold to him and his heirs, executors etc., for ever, and to his said son Thomas the 11 acres called "Bartherome," to have and to hold to him his heirs executors etc., for ever. Will shewn to Jurors.

The capital messuage called Killington Hall with the lands called Killington demesne and the messuage and 16 acres of land in Killington are held of the king as of his manor of Kirkeby Kendall called "le Marques fee" by knight service namely by the six-hundredth part of a knight's fee and are worth yearly clear £4. But by whom or by what service the mill called Bondsholme Mill in Killington is held they know not and it is worth yearly clear 13s. 4d. The capital messuage and garden in Warton co. Lanc., and the 15 messuages or burgages, 15 gardens and tofts there are held of the king as of his manor of Warton co. Lanc., in free and common socage by fealty and a free rent of . . . . . . . .yearly for all services and they are worth yearly clear 24s. The two parcels in tenure of John Cuminge and John Towminge containing six acres (sic) in Warton are held of whom they know not or by what services and are worth yearly clear six shillings. The II acres called "Bartherome" in Carneford are held of the king by knight service and by a yearly rent of 10d. and are worth yearly clear 6s. 8d. And the three messuages and 13 acres in Lindall are held of the king as of his Duchy of Lancaster by a two hundredth part of one knight's fee and are worth yearly clear 5s. Thomas Kitson so seised of premises in co. Westmorland and co. Lancaster died 5 Feb. last (1638-9) and Thomas Kitson is his son and next heir and he was aged at the time of his father's death 22 years 1 month 26 days. And Alice Kitson mother of late Thomas Kitson and late the wife of Gervase Kitson, father of the said late Thomas Kitson, is alive and living at Warton and is dowered of a third part of all the lands and tenements in co. Lancaster except the II acres in Carnford called "Bartherome." And Elizabeth late the wife of the said late Thomas Kitson is likewise alive and lives at Warton. Court of Wards Inq. p.m., vol. 93, n. 269.

1669–71 Hearth Tax Roll, Lay Subsidy 195, n. 73, m. 26, 27.

Killington.
Henry Bland 2
Ellinor Bland 3
Bryam Walker 1
John Atkinson 1
Richard Alexandr 1
Edmond Wilson 1
Widd: Wilson 1
Tho: Richardson 1
Widd: Cooke 1
Robt Yeates 2
John Aerey 1
Willm. Harrison 2
George Barker 1
Edmond Cooke 2
John Hodghson 1
Richard Hilton 1
Tho: Milburne 1
Edward Cooke 1
John Milbanke 1
Mr Heblethwte 3
Richard Milbanke 1
John Taylor 2
Joseph Strangewayes 1
Nich: Millner 1
John Pierson 2
Robt Thronbecke 2
Mr Robt Westby 6
Robt Atkinson 1
Willm Baines 1
James Baines 1
Thomas Robinson 2
Tho: Borrod 1
Widd: Waidson 2
Richard Borrod 1
James Hodghson 1
Willm. Walker 1
Willm. Parratt 2
Richard Simpson 1
Mr. Henry Harrison 3
Bryam Borrod 2
James Jackson 1
Mr Willm Ward 3
James Bainebrigg 1
Willm Gibson 1
Widd: Barker 1
John Bradley 1
John Wilson. 1
John Taylor 1
Firbanke.
John Wilson 2
Tho: Thexton 1
James Walker 2
Rowland Atkinson 2
Nich: Thexton 1
James Bainebrigg 2
Bryam Borrodall 1
James Walker 1
George Wharton 1
Antho Ward 3
Widd: Walker 2
Robt Johnson 1
Thomas Newby 2
Tho: Moore 2
Tho: Whitehead 1
John Thornburrow 1
Antho: Sutton 2
Willm. Powley 1
James Fawcett 1
Tho: Sharpe 1
Tho: Bowes 1
Bryam Heblethwte 1
Antho: Croxton 2
john Moore 3
Widd: Ward 1
Richard Ward 1
Tho: Murray 2
John Wilson. . 1
Tho: Wilson 2
Robt Nicholson 1
Tho: Moore 2
Willm Bowman 2
Tho: Moore 1
Widd: Allanby 1

Footnotes

1 The boundary of Firbank, as described, commences at the river Lune on the south-east, ascending a stream named Seuerh beck (which runs around the north side of Capplethwaite Hall demesne), to a brook which comes down from Shawgill, beside which there stands a messuage called Gillhouse Stile, thence ascending the brook to the head of the gill towards Killington, that is a little to the north of the road above Scotch Gin's Brow on the highway between Sedbergh and Kendal, thence to a wood upon Owshaw Hill where the trees were bent by the wind, thence to another wood called Sparrowhawk Shaw (near Capplethwaite Moss) and thence to the gate (i.e. road) leading towards Galloway, i.e. Scotland (now called Scotch Lane), and along this lane northward to the boundary of Lambrigg, following the same to the boundary of Grayrigg, following the same to the boundary of Dillicar, following the same (down Deep Gill, and through Beck Foot) to the river Lune near Crook of Lune Bridge. The reference to "Galwaithegate" is very interesting from this curious lane, running as directly north and south as the hills and dales permit, has been used for centuries since the date of this charter as a driving road for cattle from Scotland to England, and was probably used by the Scotch in their longer expeditions into England in the time of King Stephen and Edward II. When sheep, cattle or ponies were being driven south from Shap the stages were short and the resting places frequent. Between Tebay and Kirkby Lonsdale they were—Low Borrow Bridge, Lambrigs Park, Three Mile House, and Old Town, stages of 5 to 6 miles a day.
2 Essoin signifies an excuse for him that is summoned to appear and answer to an action, by reason of sickness and infirmity, or other just cause of absence.
3 See vol. i, p. 309 n.
4 The return for co. Cumberland states that John Pikeryng was seised as joint feoffee with Eleyna his wife, who still lives, of the manor of Britby, for term of their lives with remainder after their deaths to the right heirs of the said John Pikeryng. The Inquisition was taken at Penrith, co. Cumb., Saturday the feast of the Apostles Peter and Paul, 8 Henry V (29 June 1420).
5 This document is partly destroyed. It is quite different as to handwriting from the Court of Wards Inquisition. It gives the Jurors names and is of same date and has the same Jury as the Inquisition for Adam Cooke which is with Excheq. Inqns. They may be both "Chancery Inqns" in their wrong places.
6 Rent-seck, or dry rent, is where a man by deed passeth his estate to another, reserving a rent; or granteth a rent issuing out of his lands, without any clause of distress in the deed. He cannot distrain for this rent by reason that no distress is incident to it.