Supplementary Records
Hincaster and Sedgwick

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

John F. Curwen (editor)

Year published

1926

Pages

234-236

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'Supplementary Records: Hincaster and Sedgwick', Records relating to the Barony of Kendale: volume 3 (1926), pp. 234-236. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49373 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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HINCASTER AND SEDGWICK.

1692 15 January. Presentment that Force Bridge is in decay, order for an estimate of the charge for repair. K. Indictment Book, 1669–92.

1700 11 October. Presentment that the highway at the end of Force Bridge is in great decay; Order that the Chief Constables for Kendal and Lonsdale Wards view the same and give estimation thereof to the next Justice of Peace. K. Order Book, 1696–1724.

1706 11 October. The house of Robert Chambers in Sedgwick is licensed as a place for religious worship for the people called Quakers. Ibid.

1713/14 15 January. Presentment that Force Bridge, being a public bridge, is out of repair. K. Order Book 1696–1724.

1730/1 15 January. In pursuance of an Order made at this Sessions, Benjamin Browne, the high constable, reported that the way from Hincaster Green to Sedgwick was so narrow that there is scarce any place that either loaden horse or cart can pass one another and it is very much covered with the hedges on each side. Browne MSS., vol. i, n. 220.

1752 6 October. Presentment that from time whereof the memory of man is not to the contrary there was and yet is a certain ancient and common King's Highway leading between the market towns of K. Kendale and Milnthrop, and that a certain part of the same beginning at Well Heads in the township of Hincaster containing in length 1000 yards and in breadth 8 feet is very ruinous, miry, deep broken and in decay, etc. and that the inhabitants of the said township ought to repair it. (K. Indictment Book, 1750–60). Ordered that the inhabitants be fined the sum of £20 if the said highway be not well and sufficiently repaired before next sessions. (Ibid.). On the 18 January, 1754, the inhabitants produced a certificate that the highway was well and sufficiently repaired and received a discharge of the indictment. Ibid.

1752 6 October. Presentment that from time whereof the memory of man is not to the contrary there was and yet is a certain ancient and common King's highway leading between the market towns of K. Kendale and Milnthrop and that a certain part of the same beginning at a place called Bradshaw Wifes in the township of Sedgwick, in length half a mile and in breadth 8 feet, is very ruinous, etc. and that the inhabitants of the Township of Sedgwick ought to repair the same. (K. Indictment Book, 1750–60). Ordered that the inhabitants of Sedgwick be fined the sum of £20 if the said highway is not well and sufficiently repaired before the next Sessions. (Ibid.). On the 12 January following the inhabitants of Sedgwick present that they are not guilty of the above indictment and pray that the matter may be enquired into. (Ibid.). And on the 4 May the jury found that they were not guilty and discharged the indictment. Ibid.

1790 16 April. Licence granted to John Wakefield of Kendal, gent., to build a Gunpowder Mill on his property called Bassengill, at or near the S.E. corner of Force Bridge in Sedgwick. K. Order and Indictment Book, 1786–98.

1811 7 October. Presentment that Joseph Dobson of Hincaster on the 1 May and on divers other days unlawfully did keep at large divers great numbers to wit 10 horses, 10 mares, 10 geldings, 10 bulls and 10 cows in and upon the King's highway by reason whereof the liege subjects of the King cannot pass and repass along the said way without great hazard and danger of being torn, gored and wounded and otherwise obstructed in passing to the very great terror and danger of all, etc. (K. Indict. Book, 1811–17). A similar presentment against William Atkinson of Hincaster. Ibid.

1813 26 April. The township of Sedgwick to pay Messrs. Fell and Johnson, attorneys, £5 9s. 10d. taxed costs in prosecution for defects in a road. K. Order Book, 1811–17.

1813 12 July. Presentment that a certain common King's highway at Sedgwick is very ruinous and that there are divers large holes and pits so that for want of due reparation, guarding and fencing of the same, the subjects of the King could not pass without great danger and that the inhabitants of the township ought to repair the same. (K. Indict. Book, 1811–17). And now at this Sessions appeared John Wakefield on behalf of the inhabitants and pleaded Guilty to the indictment but craved suspension of judgment, which was granted until the next session. Ibid.

1821 28 July. On Monday last one of the Sedgwick Powder Mills was blown up. Local Chron., 48.

1830 2 October. The weir at Sedgwick has been partially destroyed by the flood, the fish have a clear run up the river and several salmon have been seen near Kendal which come up to spawn. Ibid. 81.

1857 9 January. Application by Henry Findlater Bainbridge of Sizergh to licence the erection and using of a place called a Store House for Gunpowder, also, for erecting and using a Corning House at Sedgwick belonging to Walter Charles Strickland, esq., and forming part of the Gunpowder Works lately occupied and carried on by John Wakefield and more recently by Messrs. Wakefield and Bainbridge, but now occupied by John Wakefield and called the Sedgwick Gunpowder Mills. Ordered that the licence be granted. K. Order Book, 1839–76.

1876 3 June. It was reported that the Hincaster and Arnside branch line was completed, and that a heavy train of waggons loaded with iron and drawn by three engines has been leisurely taken from Arnside to Hincaster and back to test the stability of the work. It was not intended at present to make the line double although sufficient land had been acquired for that purpose. On the 26th June the railway was opened for passenger traffic and four trains were scheduled to run each way daily, excepting on Sundays. The times of departure from Grange being 7–20, 10–10, 2–40 and 4–30; and from Kendal 9–30, 11–40, 3–40 and 5–40. The Furness Railway Company received its power to construct the line by a Bill passed in Parliament 16 July, 1866, to raise £200,000 in shares and £66,300 on loan. Running powers were also conceded to the London and North-Western Railway Company. (Westmorland Gazette). Heversham station was not opened until 1 July, 1890.