Supplementary Records
Beetham

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Institute of Historical Research

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John F. Curwen (editor)

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1926

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244-253

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'Supplementary Records: Beetham', Records relating to the Barony of Kendale: volume 3 (1926), pp. 244-253. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49376 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


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BEETHAM.

The boundaries of the Manor of Beetham are set out as follows:— Begin at Brieryam (Bryram), from thence (westerly) to Challan Ings, thence to Halehead, thence to the high nook of Sandubb and from thence to Leave Brigg. Then to Wymeadow and to Middlebarrow nook (and along the wall to its end at the Sands then by the shore) to the Yew Rake Style (in Arnside), then to Sleaty Holm (Saddle in Holme Island, then by another direct line to a place called) the Red Well Bleath (in Blawith on the west shore thence by the shore except where the Castle Head Poo leaves the shore above the Red Well in such case the boundary goes from the line from the Seatle or Saddle to the Red Well by the Castle Head Poo to where it leaves the sand or the shore the boundary leaves the boundary of Lancashire and proceeds along the north shore to where the Black Dyke in Foulshaw opposite the Staveley Stone against White Well in Whitbarrow, thence by a straight line across the Bay to the Standing Stone on the south shore). Thence to Stephlin Gate (Stephen Gate), then to Crabtree acre then to Hogherd (Hoggarth's) Garden nook, then to Abbs Well (Abbey or St. John's), then to Whassett Yeat, then to Newlands nook, then Weychelt (Wyethet), then to Rowkellet Well, then to Hale Field Gate and thus to Brieryam Gate. Beetham Repository, pp. 75, 84, 85.

1369–1441 On 6 November, 1369, William de Duresme was presented to the church of Beetham by the abbot and convent of St. Mary's (Reg. Arch. of Richmond, Yorks. Arch. Society., vol. 25, p. 175). William had a licence of non-residence on 5 September, 1372 (Reg. Thoresby, f. 294). Then followed Thomas Bryan who subsequently removed to Kendal, and on 15 July, 1439, Thomas Gedney was presented by the abbot and convent, vacant by the resignation of Thomas Bryan. (Reg. Arch. of Richmond). On 3 November, 1441, Hugh Packenham was presented by the abbot and convent on the resignation of Thomas Gedney. On the 23rd of the same month Thomas Gedney was again presented on the resignation of Hugh Packenham. Hugh's short tenure of the church was probably in order to qualify for some other post or pension. (Ibid).

1458 2 October. An indulgence was granted to visitors and others who shall say on their knees the Lord's Prayer, the Angelic Salutation, etc., before the image of St. Sithe in the southern part of the church of Beetham, "vbi populi multitudo singulis annis causa deuocionis veneracionisque ipsius sancte Sithe virginis confluit et accedit," and who shall contribute to the finding and maintenance of a chaplain at the altar of St. Sithe. Yorks. Arch. Journal, vol. 25, p. 229.

1459 The church of Beetham was granted by charter of 8 October, 1459, by the abbot and convent of St. Mary's to the feoffees of the chantry of Jesus and Our Lady in the church of Eccles, and a Crown licence for the feoffees to alienate the advowson to the chantry priests and for these to appropriate, was issued 1 December following. (Records of Kendale, II, 228). The decree of appropriation was made by archbishop William Bothe on 19 June, 1460, when the rector was one Master John Sendale. Reg. W. Bothe, ff. 253–255.

1535 Rural Deanery of Kendall. Vicarage of the Church of Beethome. Rectory appropriated to the Chantry in the names of Jesus and St. Mary of Eccles. James Bruche, incumbent.

The aforesaid Vicarage is worth in

Mansion with garden appropriated to the same per annum 10 0
Annual Rectorial pension in coin £13 0 0
Oblations 1 8
13 11 8
Reprisals to wit. Procurations 4 4
And Clear Value £13 7 4
A tenth part whereof 1 6 9

Valor Ecclesiasticus, vol. 5, p. 268.

1624–1639 In 1624 Sir Francis Ducket farmer for the vicar Edward Fisher paid £2 8s. 0d. subsidy. For the three years 1634 to 1636 Edward Fisher as Vicar promised to contribute (blank) yearly toward the repair of St. Paul's Cathedral. In 1639 contributions were received from the clergy in aid of the war against the Scots, to which Edward Fisher paid nothing, he being "a Scot." Lanc. and Cheshire Record Society, vol. XII, pp. 82, 96, 124.

1645/6 10 March. William Moone or Mohun was instituted vicar on June 10, 1644, and in the Westmorland Certificate he is described as "a very weake and unable minr" He was still at the Vicarage in 1648. Nightingale, The Ejected of 1662, ii, 984.

1696 24 April. The following being suspected persons, have neglected or refused to make and subscribe the Declaration and take the oaths: Thomas Bradley, William Bradley and Ann his wife, Jasper Bouskell and Ralph Bouskell, in Beetham. K. Indictment Book, 1692–1724.

1696 14 July. William Jackson, vicar of Beathom, signed the antiJacobite "Association" formed throughout the Kingdom for the protection of William III. K. Indictment Book, 1692–1724.

1696 9 October. The highway, in Beathome and Haile, leading from Beathome to Arkenthwaite (Paradise Lane) being in great decay; the inhabitants were fined 1s. Ibid.

1699 21 April. Judgment set aside on appeal against James Kellet at the complaint of William Jackson, vicar of Bethome, for some pretended arrears of tithes and small dues, which appeal Jackson did not defend. K. Order Book, 1696–1724.

1701/2 16 January. Beetham Bridge is presented as ruinous and in decay: Order for the Chief Constable to call some sufficient workmen to view the said bridge and give an estimate for its repair on 14 February, and that Josiah Burrow and John Johnson be viewers. (K. Order Book, 1696–1724). On 17 April following it was reported that John Cort of Borwick, Rowland Walker of Strickland and Thomas Taylor of Kendall have severally offered to repair Beetham Bridge and Milthrop Bridge, being public bridges in decay, for £20. It is referred to Edward Wilson, Esq., and Mr. William Johnson to select the best workmen of the three and to meet at Dallam Tower on Friday next to make an agreement. Ibid.

1703/4 14 January. Petition of the inhabitants of Beethome, that the highway adjoining the bridge at Beathome, being about 50 yards in length and 3 yards in breadth is much out of repair and that passengers are in great danger; Order that the two high constables, Mr. William Johnson and James Bland, view, measure and report their opinion thereof. K. Order Book, 1696–1724.

1708/9 14 January. Presentment that Beathom Bridge is out of repair; order that the chief constable view the same and cause it to be repaired. K. Order Book, 1696–1724.

1710 11 July. Order to the chief constable of Kendal Ward to view and repair Beetham, Sampay and Hang bridges. K. Indictment Book, 1692–1724.

1714 9 April. Presentment that Beetham Bridge and Hang Bridge are very dangerous, order to the high constable to view and contract. (K. Order Book, 1696–1724.) In the specification four pillars or Jewells (fn. 1) are mentioned as supporting Beetham Bridge. Browne MSS., vol. ii, n. 42.

1715 26 November. Warrant from Daniel Wilson, John Archer, John Fisher and Anthony Askew for search to be made for George Hilton, Esq., of Beetham, who was concerned in the late Rebellion and who has made his escape since the defeat of the rebels at Preston. Hist. MSS. Com., 10th Rep. 348.

1715 One-third of the Parsonage house of Beetham was held in trust by William Sandford of Askham and Timothy Banks of Skipton, for William Gandy, Anne Gandy his sister and their infant brothers James and Anthony, all four being children of William and Eleanor Gandy; valued at £26 5s. English Catholic Nonjurors of 1715.

1715/6 13 January. Rowland Dowker of Beathom, yeoman, bound over in £100, with Thomas Johnson of Hoss Flatt and John Dickinson of Beathom, yeomen, his sureties, in £50 each, to appear at the next Assizes to answer such matters as shall be objected against him for furnishing the Rebels with arms. K. Indictment Book, 1692–1724.

1720 29 April. Thomas Braben of Beathom, gent., indicted for obstructing, by fence, a footpath leading from a place called Haile to the parish church of Beathom, fined 6d. Ibid.

Order for the high constable to view the public bridge, called Beetham Bridge. K. Order Book, 1696–1724.

1730/1 15 January. In pursuance of an Order made at this Sessions, Benjamin Browne, the high constable, reported that the way from Holme to the Hang Bridge and from thence to Ackenthwaite Green was in several places narrow and much covered with thorn and hazel. Browne MSS., vol. i, n. 220.

1731/2 14 January. Order to the high constable to view the public bridge called Hang Bridge on the highway between Milthrop and Burton and report. (K. Order Book, 1725–37). On 21 April following an order was issued to contract for the repair of Hang Bridge. Ibid.

1751-52 Beetham Bridge was widened. Beetham Repository, 95.

1753 5 October. Daniel Wilson, vicar of Betholme, co. Westmorland, took the oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy and the oath of Abjuration and made the Declaration against Transubstantiation and subscribed the same according to Law. K. Indictment Book, 1750– 60.

1770 The two Overthwaite Bridges leading from Overthwaite to Ackenthwaite were built and supported at the joint expence of the four estates of which Overthwaite consists. Pious or Pius Bridge was rebuilt in 1770 at the joint expence of Hale and Whasset, it had been previously rebuilt in 1708. Hale Bridge at the bottom of the Green was likewise rebuilt in 1771 by the owners of such lands as lie over the water. Pow Darkin Bridge and the bridge in Beetham Hall Miln lane, being at the extremity of the roads repaired by Beetham, are supported by the surveyor of Beetham and the surveyor of Hale and Whasset jointly. Beetham Bridge is a good width and raised on seven arches, in length about 270 feet. Though called Beetham Bridge the west end butts in Haverbrack, the lower side at the east end in Cappleside, the higher side only in Beetham Liberty. The Stone House (Cappleside Hall) on the top of the hill remains a complete military tenement to this day, fences itself round and pays the lord 40s. annual rent. Beetham Repository, pp. 61, 62, 95.

The illustration shows the old bridge with Cappleside Hall in the distance.

1770 8 January. Petition of the Surveyor of highways in the township of Beethom setting forth that the highways there are greatly out of repair and that the Statute work is insufficient for the effectual repair of the same; it is ordered that an assessment of 6d. in the pound be levied upon the several inhabitants owners and occupiers and in case of refusal or non payment within 10 days after demand by distress and sale of goods, etc. K. Order Book, 1760–70.

1785 3 October. Presentment that Hang Bridge is a public bridge and is in great decay and ought to be repaired at the expense of the county. (K. Indict. Book, 1780–87). On 6 October, 1786, it was certified as being in good and sufficient repair. Ibid.

1811 15 July. Presentment that there is a common and ancient King's highway leading from Beethom towards and unto the market town of Burton, and that a certain part of the same beginning at a bridge called Hang Bridge and so towards Beethom for the length of 105 feet and 12 feet in breadth, is in great decay, and that the inhabitants of the county ought to repair the same. K. Indictment Book, 1811–17.


Beetham bridges

1811 7 October. Joseph Thexton, vicar of Beetham, took the oaths of allegiance, supremacy and abjuration and made the Declaration against Transubstantiation and subscribed the same according to law. Ibid.

1812 5 October. Presentment that there is a common and ancient King's highway leading from a certain bridge (on the Turnpike road between the market town of Burton and the market town of Milnthorpe) called Hang Bridge towards and unto the village of Beetham and that a certain part of the same beginning at a place called Pool Darken Bridge and so continued towards Hang Bridge for the length of 2625 feet and of the width of 18 feet, is in great decay etc., and that the inhabitants of the townships of Hale and Whassett ought to repair the same. (Ibid.). On 11 January, 1813, John Beethom and Richard Dennison submitted to the indictment and prayed the suspension of the judgment which was granted until the next Easter Sessions. (Ibid.). On 4 October, 1813, a certificate that the road was in good order was filed and the indictment discharged. Ibid.

1814 The Act for inclosing lands in the manor of Beetham was passed in 54 George III, c. 68.

1818 19 October. Presentment that Beetham Bridge over the river Bela in the King's highway leading from the market town of Milnthorp to the market town of Lancaster, is in great decay, etc. and ought to be repaired at the expense of the county. (K. Indict. Book, 1817–24). On 15 August, 1721, Christopher Woodburn, free mason, gives receipt for £3 10s. his charges for repairing the bridge. Browne MSS. vol. i, n. 250.

1820 10 January. Filed an order with plan annexed for stopping up certain public footways in the township of Beetham. K. Order Book, 1817–24.

1822 15 April. Filed an order with plan annexed for stopping up a certain public footway lying between the village of Beetham and the village of Storth, as being unnecessary. K. Indictment Book, 1817–24.

1822 15 April. On the 20th February, 1819, the building of a new bridge over the Bela at Beetham is advertised to let, upon the line of the intended Turnpike road from Carnforth to Ulverston (Local Chron., 33). And on the roll of this Sessions is filed a certificate that the bridge is erected and completed in a substantial and commodious manner. K. Indict. Book, 1817–24.

1824 18 October. William Hornby committed to the House of Correction at Kendal for a fortnight for breaking the common pound at Slackhead and taking out 3 horses, 3 mares, 3 geldings and 3 foals, value £10, belonging to himself, found straying on the Ulverston and Carnforth Turnpike Road and impounded. K. Indictment Book, 1824–34.

1826 13 January. Certificate that such parts of the Ulverston Turnpike road as are within the division of Hale and Whasset are formed in a workmanlike and substantial manner. (Ibid.). Also an order that the said Division shall pay the sum of £4 8s. 11d. as a composition for Statute work liable to be done by the said inhabitants upon the said turnpike. Ibid.

1826 3 April. Presentment that there is a common and ancient highway leading out of the Turnpike road at or near a place called Clawthorp Hall unto and terminating in the said turnpike road at or near Nether Bridge, and that a certain part of the said King's common highway in the Division of Hale and Whasset, beginning at a place called Witchell which divides the parishes of Burton and Betham, and so continued towards the market town of Milnthorpe, of the length of 2998 yards and of the breadth of 7 yards, is in great decay, etc., and ought to be repaired by the inhabitants of Hale and Whasset. Ibid.

1826 3 April. Order with plan annexed for stopping up, and selling a certain footway commencing at an ancient footway leading from Hale to Slackhead at or near a stile leading out of an allotment belonging to George Wilson, Esq., into Beetham Park and proceeding in a westwardly direction across the said allotment into the Beetham Hall allotment and terminating in the ancient footway leading from Beetham to Yealand Redmayne, of the length of 240 yards.

Also an order for diverting and turning a certain footway commencing at the above stile at or near Slackhead from and out of the highway leading from Beetham to Leighton Beck and proceeding in a south-easterly direction through the said Park, along a narrow lane unto and terminating in the footroad leading from Hale to Yealand Redmayne at or near a dwelling house belonging to the said George Wilson in the occupation of Richard Mount, of the length of 1036 yards, on the plan coloured red. Also an order with plan for stopping up and selling a certain footway commencing at the above stile near Slackhead leading from and out of the highway leading from Beethom to Yealand Redmayne at or near a house belonging to John Dixon at Slackhead and proceeding in an easterly and north easterly direction through and over a close called Deepdale through Beethom Park and across a close of land called Nearer Mains unto the Gate leading into Beethom Hall farm yard and from thence across the said yard unto and terminating at a certain footway leading from Beethom to Hale, of the length altogether of 886 yards.

Also an order with plan for diverting and turning a certain footway commencing at a stile leading into a close called Nearer Mains and proceeding in a south easterly direction across the said close through Beethom Hall farm yard unto a stile leading into a close called Hawking Hall and from thence proceeding in a southerly direction across the said close unto and terminating at a stile leading unto a close called the Croft belonging to John Beethom, of the length of 902 yards, coloured red.

Also an order with plan for diverting a certain footway leading from and out of the highway leading from Haverbrack to Milnthorpe at or near the Gate leading into Dallam Tower Park and proceeding in a north easterly direction across a part of the said Park unto and into a certain public footway leading from Beethom to Milnthorpe, of the length of 466 yards.

Also an order with plan for diverting part of a certain footway from Beethom to Yealand Redmayne commencing at a stile into a close called Nearer Mains and proceeding in a southerly direction across the said close through Beetham Park and across Beethom Hall allotment unto and terminating at a stile leading from and out of the said allotment on the south side thereof, of the length altogether of 1550 yards. K. Indict. Book, 1824–34.

1837 A curious custom still prevailed at Beetham, viz. when a marriage had taken place the young men visited the bride and bridegroom in their house and asked for "Hen silver." K. Notes and Queries, n. 150.

1839 8 April. Presentment that Hang Bridge in the common Queen's highway leading from the town of Milnthorpe unto the town of Burton, is ruinous, broken, dangerous and in great decay, etc., and that the inhabitants of the county of right have been and still of right are bound to repair and amend when and so often as it shall be necessary. (K. Indict. Book, 1839–52). Ordered that Mr. John Wakefield, Mr. W. W. Atkinson and Mr. Edward Wilson be requested to view along with the Bridge Master and report to the next Sessions as to the State of repair and as to the objections urged against it by Mr. Hutton. K. Order Book, 1839–76.

1839 14 October. Recommended that Mr. Edward Wilson, John Wakefield, W. W. Atkinson and George Wilson, Esqrs., be appointed a committee to inspect and examine whether it be necessary to erect an additional arch at Hang Bridge to take the excess of water in case of floods. (K. Order Book, 1839–76). On 3 January following they presented their report when it was ordered that the foundations of Hang Bridge be improved and the water way be increased by that means and that a small piece of land belonging to Mr. Fothergill be purchased according to the plan now produced. (Ibid.) On 2 July, 1840, it was ordered that the Bridge master do further deepen the bed of the river below Hang Bridge, Mr. Hutton paying half of the expense. Ibid.

1844 18 October. The Rev. William Hutton took the usual oaths and subscribed the Declaration on his appointment to the Vicarage of Beetham. K. Minute Book, 1839-59.

1861 5 July. Report that the bed of the river near Hang Bridge is in such a state as to prevent the flow of the water through the bridge. Resolved that it did not devolve upon the county to remove the obstruction. K. Minute Book, 1859–75.

Footnotes

1 Jewel, a variant of jowel. Cf. Fr. jouelle a yoke, jouelles arched or yoked vines. One of the piers or supporters of a wooden bridge. "To the reedifying and building of a new bridge of xxj jowelles adjoinyng the wallis of the forsaid Citie (Carlisle) standing over the river Eden now beyng decayed . . . we signifie to you that att the making herof ther is bulded fyve jowelles and oon land staple . . . . . and the werkmen er besy lauboring and wirking for moo jowelles daily . . . . . tymber is right skant to be gotten in any parte within xx myles of the saide Citie . . . . . Geven att Karlisle the xiij day of June the viijth yere of the Reign of our Most Naturall Soverayn lord King Henry the viijth." Hist. MSS. Com., 12th Report, vii, p. 6.