The Register
Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Francis Grainger & W.G. Collingwood (editors)

Year published

1929

Supporting documents

Pages

38-39

Citation Show another format:

'The Register: Newcastle-upon-Tyne', Register & Records of Holm Cultram (1929), pp. 38-39. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49495 Date accessed: 20 August 2014.


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Newcastle-Upon-Tyne.

98. (C. p. 69; D. art. 81).—Walter de Teindale grants to Holm abbey all his land in Newcastle (in novo castro) with the buildings, between the land of the hospital of St. Mary of Westgate and that which belonged to Radulph Long; paying ferm to the king three halfpence a year as a free burgage. Dated in the court at Newcastle, Monday after St. Gregory (March 12th), 18 Henry f. John. Witnesses—William de Extildesham, Roger f. William, Henry de Karliolo [bailiff of Newcastle and mayor in 1253], and Hugh de Hedd[on?], then provosts [1235].

99. (C. p. 70).—H[enry], abbot of Holm, grants to fee farm to Henry de Karleolo, burgess of Newcastle, all his land between that formerly held by Radulph Long and the hospital of St. Mary of Westgate, at a yearly rent of 32s. in silver and the usual tax to the king. If Henry fails in payment the abbot can distrain. [Henry was abbot from 1255 to 1267 or later. Some notice of the family de Carliol at Newcastle is given in Archæologia Aeliana, 3rd series, i, 156ff. The date is c. 1255.]

100. (C. pp. 70, 71).—Bartholomew Benedictus of Newcastle grants to the abbot, etc. of Holmcoltran all his land at Newcastle in Pampeden [Pandon], with buildings, etc., between land formerly of Nicholas f. Hervis and Roger, nephew (nepos) of Walter, from the king's highway (strata) to the Tyne; rendering yearly to the king three halfpence. At the court of Newcastle, Monday after Michaelmas, 1237.

100a. (H. 1 and 2; D. art. 81).—Adam de Bolteby [who held a barony in Tindale including Featherstonhaugh (Arch. Ael. 3rd ser. xiii, 245n.)] gives right of way through his land for waggons, packhorses and carts going to and fro between Holm and Newcastle with wool and other goods. They can rest and spend the night anywhere outside his park and the crops and meadows of his tenants; if damage is done, it shall be paid for at a valuation by men of honour. Witnesses—Gilbert de Wirkenton, sheriff of Cumberland, etc. [1279–83].

100b. (D. art. 81).—Matillis de Multon, lady of Gilsland, for the soul of her late husband Sir Thomas de Multon, grants right of way [as no. 100a] through Gilsland on journeys to Newcastle [1271–93].