Parishes
Slapton - South Sydenham

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Daniel and Samuel Lysons

Year published

1822

Pages

451-468

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'Parishes: Slapton - South Sydenham', Magna Britannia: volume 6: Devonshire (1822), pp. 451-468. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50591&strquery=east%2Bstonehouse%252c%2BDevon Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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Slapton

SLAPTON, in the hundred of Coleridge and in the deanery of Woodleigh, lies on the south coast, about six miles from Dartmouth.

The manor of Slapton belonged to the ancient family of De Brian, as early as the reign of Henry II., and they continued to possess it till that of Henry IV.: it eventually became the property of Percy, Earl of Northumberland, as descended from the sole heiress of Sir Guy de Brian the younger, through Fitz Payne and Poynings. It was allotted to the Earl of Northumberland, by arbitration, after a long litigation with St. Maur, descended from one of the sisters of the said Sir Guy de Brian. Henry, Earl of Northumberland, sold this manor to Sir Matthew Arundell, father of Lord Arundell of Wardour, who possessed it in the reign of Charles I. After this, it was in the Kellands: a moiety was purchased of Lady Northcote, one of the co-heiresses of Kelland, by the grandfather of A. H. Holdsworth, Esq., the present proprietor. The other moiety was purchased, about 1799, of Lord Cork and Mr. Pointz, representatives of the other co-heiress of Kelland, (through the Courtenays,) by William Roberts, Esq., the present proprietor.

The manor was formerly held of the See of Exeter, by the service of being steward at the bishop's installing feast. (fn. 1)

Pole, or Poole, in this parish, is said (but I think erroneously) to have been a priory. It was the seat of the Brians, and afterwards of the Ameridiths, who sold it to Sir Richard Hawkins, the celebrated naval officer, in the reign of James I. The Hawkins' family for some time resided at Poole. Some years ago, it belonged to Henry Fownes Lutterell, Esq., and is now the property of Mr. Nicholas Paige. The ruins of the old mansion were taken down about the year 1800.

Mr. Polwhele speaks of some handsome monuments of the Ameridiths, one of which had the date of 1610. These monuments are not now to be seen. Sir Guy de Brian, in the year 1373, founded a collegiate chapel at Slapton, for a rector and five fellows, and four clerks, in the chapel of St. Mary, adjoining the parish-church. It was surrendered in 1545, and granted to Thomas Arundell; the lands being then valued at 63l. 6s. 2d. per annum. This estate, with the impropriate tithes, continued, for many generations, in the Arundell family; the college estate was purchased of that family by Mr. William Paige, who is patron of the benefice. The tithes have been sold to the several land-owners.

Mr. Charles Kelland, in 1684, gave 50l. for apprenticing of children, and Mr. John Kelland, in 1692, the sum of 100l. for their instruction. These sums were laid out in lands, which now produce 16l. per annum.

South Leigh

SOUTH LEIGH, in the hundred of Colyton and in the deanery of Honiton, lies about six miles from Honiton, and three from Colyton.

The manor belonged anciently to the family of Leigh, whose heiress married Polston. It was afterwards in the Courtenays, who conveyed it in exchange to Bonville, after which time it passed with Northleigh to the Rev. Samuel How, of whom it was purchased, in 1821, by Charles Gordon, Esq. The manor and barton of Wiscombe, or Wishcombe, being the principal estate in the parish, was anciently held by the family of Dalditch under the abbey of St. Michael, in Normandy. The abbot of that house conveyed it to Sir Nicholas Bonville. Leland, speaking of Wiscombe in the reign of Henry VIII., calls it "a fair maner-place, some time the Lord Bonville's, now the Marquis of Dorset's." After the attainder of the Marquis, (then Duke of Suffolk,) this estate became the property of the Petres, and having passed with the manors of North and South Leigh, was purchased of the Hows about 1815, by Charles Gordon, Esq., the present proprietor, who resides at Wiscombe.

Morgan's Hayes, in this parish, was for 15 descents in the family of Morgan, whose co-heiresses sold it to Rose. It was afterwards successively in Shepherd, Cholmondeley, Vickers, and Mann. The late Sir John William Pole purchased it of Sir Horace Mann, and it now belongs to his son Sir William Templer Pole, Bart.

The barton of Scrivell, or Scruell, which was in the family of Walrond from the reign of Edward I. till the seventeenth century, if not later, belongs now to Mr. John Pomeroy, of Boycomb, by purchase from James Townsend, Esq., of Honiton.

In the parish-church are memorials of John Rose, Esq., of Morgan's Hayes, 1705; Thomas Vickers, Esq., 1753, (he married a sister of Stanbrook Cholmondeley, from whom she inherited this estate); and Robert Drake, "Armiger auratus," 1600. The Rev. James How, in the year 1816, gave, by will, the sum of 100l., 5 per cent., for the endowment of a Sunday-school at this place.

Sowton

SOWTON, in the hundred of Wonford and in the deanery of Aylesbeare, lies about three miles and a half from Exeter.

The manor of Sowton, alias Clist Fomeson (fn. 2) , (erroneously printed in Risdon's survey Somson) belonged, in the reign of Henry III., to the family of Fomeson, whose heiress brought it to Ash. This family possessed it till the death of Henry Ash, Esq., the last heir male, in 1763. In 1775 it was adjudged to Miss Salter, as heir-at law to the Ash family. The manor now belongs to Lord Graves, who purchased it of the heirs of Miss Salter, about the year 1800. Part of Clist Sachville is in this parish.

In the parish-church are monuments of the family of Beavis of Clist House (fn. 3) , in the adjoining parish of Farrington; and that of Dr. William Stuart, rector, 1734. The bishop of Exeter is patron of the rectory.

Thomas Weare, in 1691, gave 3l. 15s. per annum for educating five poor children, and providing them with books.

Spreyton

SPREYTON, in the hundred of Wonford and in the deanery of Dunsford, lies about eight miles from Oakhampton.

The manor belonged, in the reign of Henry II., to the Talbots, whose heiress, in the reign of Henry VI., brought it to the family of Kelly. This estate was sold by the descendant of the last-mentioned family to John Cann, Esq., of Fuidge, and Mr. William Battishull of Barton. The manor is now the property of George Lambert, Esq. The lords of Spreyton had formerly the power of inflicting capital punishment. (fn. 4)

An inscription, purporting that the Talbot family contributed to the expense of the structure, proves that the building of the parish-church was as old as the reign of Henry VI.

In this church are memorials of Thomas Hone, Esq., of Nympton, 1746: and John Cann, Gent., 1767. The church of Spreyton belonged to the abbot and convent of Tavistock. The impropriation and advowson were granted to the Russell family with the other possessions of the abbey. The great tithes were sold by the late Duke of Bedford to the land-owners, and the advowson to the Rev. R. Holland, who is the present patron.

Church Staunton

CHURCH STAUNTON, in the hundred of Hemiock and in the deanery of Dunkeswell, is situated on Blackdown, near the borders of Somersetshire, five miles from Wellington, and seven from Taunton. The principal villages in this parish are Churchenford, (on the road from Honiton to Taunton,) Stapley, Red Lane, and Burnworthy. There are cattle-fairs at Churchenford, January 25., and March 6.

The manor of Staunton Tudenham belonged to the family of Tudenham in the reign of Henry III. Sir Robert de Tudenham sold it to Sir William Damarell, whose heiress brought it to Bonville. After the attainder of the Duke of Suffolk, it was purchased of the crown by the Clifton family. Gervais Lord Cifton sold it to Chief Justice Popham of whose descendant it was purchased by the uncle of Samuel Southwood, Esq., of Burnworthy, the present proprietor. The Rev. Robert Pearce Clarke is patron of the rectory. The tithes are governed by a corn-rent, averaged every fourteen years under the act of parliament by which the waste lands were enclosed, in or about 1802. John Salkeld, called by King James I. the learned Salkeld, author of two treatises, entitled "Of Angels," and "Of Paradise," and several controversial works, was ejected from Church Staunton in 1647, at the age of 72. He died at Uffculme in 1659, and was there buried.

Mrs. Mary Waldron, in 1749, gave the sum of 100l. to purchase lands, out of which 2l. 2s. per annum is appropriated to a school at Church Staunton.

Staverton

STAVERTON, in the hundred of Haytor and in the deanery of Ipplepen, is situated three miles from Totnes, five from Ashburton, and seven from Newton Abbot. Sparkwell, Woolston Green, and Strechford, are villages in this parish.

This parish abounds in orchards, which, in a full-bearing year, are supposed to produce about 8000 hogsheads of cyder. There are 32 pounds and presses in the parish.

The manor has, from an early period, belonged to the dean and chapter of Exeter. The manor of Barkington, some time in the family of Worth, was of late years successively in John Preston, Esq., and Sir F. L. Rogers, Bart. It is now the property of John Maye, Esq. Sparkwell barton gave name to a family, from whom it passed by successive female heirs to Barnhouse and Rowe. Kingston, which had been in the Barnhouse family in the reign of Edward I., passed by marriage to Rowe, and was the seat of that family for many generations. It was rebuilt by John Rowe, Esq., in 1743. Sparkwell was purchased, about 1808, of the family of Preston by Philip Michelmore, Esq., the present proprietor. Kingston was, in 1792, the property and residence of Mr. Thomas Bradridge, of whose executors it was purchased by Mr. William Rundle, the present proprietor.

The barton of Pridhamsleigh, which by the name seems to have belonged formerly to the ancient family of Prudhome, or Pridham, was some time the property and residence of William Drake Gould, Esq. It was purchased by the late Lord Ashburton, and now belongs to his son, the present lord. The barton of Blackler has been long in the family of Wolston, and is now the property of Christopher Wolston, Esq. Little Ambrook has been some time in the Neyles, and now belongs to Mrs. Neyle, widow of the late Rev. William Neyle.

In the parish-church is the monument of John Rowe, Esq., (son and heir of Sergeant Rowe,) 1592. The dean and chapter of Exeter are appropriators of the great tithes, and patrons of the vicarage, which is in their peculiar jurisdiction. Dr. Baker, the late vicar, who died in 1803, gave 10l. per annum for instructing poor children, and the late Thomas Bradridge, Esq., in 1815, 2l. per annum for the same purpose.

Stockleigh English

STOCKLEIGH ENGLISH, in the hundred of West Budleigh, and in the deanery of Cadbury, lies about four miles and a half from Crediton. The manor belonged to the ancient family of English, from whom it passed by successive female heirs to Champernowne and Bottreaux. Sir William Pole speaks of this manor as lately purchased by Snittall and Hanse, as agents, probably, for the Bellew family, who have possessed it nearly 200 years. It is now the property of John Bellew, Esq. In the parish-church are memorials for William Bellew, Esq., 1757; Thomas Bellew, Esq., 1772; and Thomas Bellew, Esq., 1789. The King is patron of the rectory.

Stockleigh Pomeroy, or South Stockleigh

STOCKLEIGH POMEROY, or SOUTH STOCKLEIGH, in the hundred of West Budleigh and in the deanery of Cadbury, lies about four miles from Crediton, and about eight from Tiverton, near the turnpike-road. The manor belonged, for many generations, to the ancient family of Pomeroy, as parcel of the barony of Berry. (fn. 5) It is said to have been forfeited by Sir Thomas Pomeroy, for killing a pursuivant at arms: this is a mere tradition, but it might have happened in the rebellion of 1549, for his share in which he was attainted. It is now the property of Sir John Davie, Bart., in whose family it was as early as 1672, if not at an earlier period. The bishop is patron of the rectory.

Stoke Canon

STOKE CANON, in the hundred of Wonford and in the deanery of Aylesbeare, lies about three miles and a half from Exeter. The manor, which was given to the church of Exeter by King Athelstan (fn. 6) , still belongs to the dean and chapter: they are appropriators of the tithes, and patrons of the perpetual curacy, which is in their peculiar jurisdiction.

Oakey, or Oakhay, now held by Montagu Parker, Esq., under the dean and chapter, was some time a seat of the younger branch of the Rodds. In the parish-church is the monument of William Peterson, S.T.P., dean of Exeter, 1661.

Sir Thomas Fairfax established a garrison at Stoke Canon in the month of October, 1645, to act with other garrisons in the neighbourhood in the blockade of Exeter. (fn. 7)

Stoke Damarell

STOKE DAMARELL, usually written DAMERELL, in the hundred of Roborough and in the deanery of Tamerton, adjoins the populous town of Plymouth Dock, which is in this parish. Morice-town, where is the ferry on the great western road to Falmouth and the Land's end, is also in this parish. There is an annual fair at Morice-town on Whit-Monday.

The manor of Stoke belonged, at the time of taking the Domesday survey, to the ancestor of the ancient family of Damarell, who continued to possess it in the reign of Edward II. It came afterwards to the Courtenays. Lands in this parish belonged, in the reign of Edward II., to the family of Kemiell, afterwards to the Branscombes, from whom they passed, by successive marriages, to Britt and Wise. Sir Thomas Wise, being possessed of these lands and the manor, built a house for his own residence at Mount Wise, where is now a battery. In 1667 Sir Edward Wise sold the manor of Stoke Damarell, with its appurtenances, to Sir William Morice for 11,000l. On the death of Sir William Morice, Bart., in 1749, the Stoke Damarell estate passed under his will to his nephew, Sir John St. Aubyn, Bart., father of Sir John St. Aubyn, Bart., the present proprietor. In consequence of the establishment of the royal dock-yard within this parish and manor, and the subsequent building of the very populous town of Plymouth Dock (fn. 8) , this estate has become of great value. The barton of Swilly, in this parish, belongs to James Furneaux, a minor, in whose family it has been a considerable time. The barton of Ford is the property of George Couch, Esq.

In the parish-church are monuments of Chetwynd Phillips, 1701; Hasden Young, 1753; the Rev. Henry Hawes, rector, 1728; Peter Robinson, 1790; Major-general Alexander Rigby, 1793; Lieutenant William Buller, of his Majesty's ship Impregnable, who died of his wounds received on the glorious first of June, 1794; and Thomas Fitzherbert, Esq., ViceAdmiral of the Blue, 1794. Sir John St. Aubyn is patron of the rectory, the advowson of which was granted to Sir William Morice by King Charles II. There are two chapels in Dock-town, St. Aubyn chapel, built in 1771, and St. John's, built in 1779, besides the chapel in the Dock-yard, which was rebuilt in 1818.

I have been favoured (fn. 9) with the following list of dissenting meetinghouses in the parish of Stoke Damarell, including Plymouth Dock, which I have every reason to believe to be perfectly accurate, and to be given in the terms by which the several congregations are, among themselves, denominated. — One of Unitarians; two of Particular Baptists; three of Wesleyan Methodists, in the old connection; one of Independent Wesleyan Methodists, recently separated from the connection; one of Moravians; seven of Independent High Calvinists; one of Moderate Calvinists; one of Rellyan (fn. 10) Universalists; one of Bryanites (fn. 11) ; and one of Southcottonians. (fn. 12)

There is no endowed school in this parish, but a great portion of the children of the poor have the benefit of gratuitous instruction. At Stoke Damarell is a Lancasterian school, in which 230 boys and 50 girls are taught, supported by annual contributions. A school-house was built by subscription, about the year 1800, adjoining St. John's chapel; it is supported by the same means, and 250 boys are educated in it, according to the Madras system. A fund of about 1350l. 3 per cent. has accumulated from the annual balances. There is a school also at Plymouth Dock, for the education and clothing of 80 girls, instituted in 1799, and supported by subscription. About 250 children in this parish are educated at the expense of the Baptists, and nearly 1700 by other dissenters.

The royal dock at Plymouth, in the parish of Stoke Damarell, was established by King William: it comprises about seventy-one acres, the greater part being held on lease, under Sir John St. Aubyn. It was first enlarged in 1728, when forty acres were leased to government by Sir William Morice, then lord of the manor: it was enlarged to its present extent in 1768. Within the yard, is the basin constructed in the reign of King William, and the dock, sufficiently capacious for the reception of a seventy-four gun ship; three other docks, some of them being of much larger dimensions, and four building slips: the rigging-house, a handsome building, 480 feet in length, forms one side of a quadrangle, the other sides of which are occupied by spacious store-houses. The blacksmith's shop, a spacious building, 210 feet square, contains forty-eight forges; anchors of five tons' weight are here made: upon the wharf in front are stored several hundred of anchors: near the anchor-wharf are slips for building ships; and northward of it, the mast-house for building, and a pond for floating masts. In the interior of the yard, are the rope-houses, in which cables of a hundred fathom in length, are constructed; within the walls also, are various other buildings and work-houses, connected with the establishment; the dwellinghouses of the commissioners and other officers, and the chapel, which was originally built in the year 1700.

Adjoining the dock-yard is the gun-wharf, begun about the year 1718: the buildings were designed by Sir John Vanburgh. There are capacious storehouses for muskets, pistols, &c.

The populous town of Plymouth Dock, and its vicinity, are supplied by excellent provision markets, held on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. The tolls are said to have been rented in 1812 at upwards of 2000l. per annum. There are two quays at Plymouth Dock for trading vessels; but there is scarcely any trade carried on except the importation of coals, for the use of the inhabitants. The town of Dock and the dock-yard are defended by strong fortifications. The town is bounded by a wall twelve feet high on the north, east, and south sides, called the King's interior boundary-wall, which was begun to be built in 1787, under the direction of the Duke of Richmond. The western side is skirted by the dock-yard and gunwharf; without the wall, is a breast-work, from twelve to eighteen feet deep, excavated from the solid slate or limestone-rock. These lines were planned by Mr. Smelt, of the engineers, and begun about 1756. The space between the king's interior boundary-wall and the front of the glacis of the lines, (about 195 acres,) was purchased by government in 1758. On this space are six squares of barracks, capable of containing 3000 men, and the government-house, a handsome building, completed about the year 1795, when the seat of government was removed thither from the citadel at Plymouth. The barracks were begun in 1757.

The principal batteries are, one at Mount Wise; another near Mount Edgecumbe; and the redoubt and block-houses, at Mount Pleasant. The view at the latter is most beautiful and extensive, comprehending almost every interesting object in the immediate vicinity of this interesting spot. At some distance from Plymouth Dock, up the river, are a powder-magazine and powder-kilns. Near the church, at Stoke Damarell, is the military hospital, built in 1797, capable, upon occasion, of receiving 500 invalid soldiers.

Stoke Fleming

STOKE FLEMING, in the hundred of Coleridge and in the deanery of Ipplepen, lies on the south coast, about two miles and a half from Dartmouth. The villages of Emeridge, Ash, and Bugford, are in this parish.

The manor was part of the ancient inheritance of the Flemings, from whom it took the additional name. After several descents in this family, Sir William Fleming conveyed it to Reginald, Lord Mohun, of Dunster. From the Mohuns it passed by marriage to Carew: Sir Peter Carew gave it to Thomas Southcote, Esq., who had married his niece. It is now, by purchase from the late John Henry Southcote, Esq., the property of John Henry Seale, Esq., of Mount Boone.

Christopher Farwell, Esq., of Totnes, is patron of the rectory. Richard Raynolds, who was ejected from this living, when upwards of eighty years of age, in 1646, survived the restoration, was repossessed of his rectory, and died a few years afterwards, aged nearly 100. It is said that he bore his sufferings with extraordinary patience and cheerfulness, and always felt a confident persuasion that he should live to be reinstated.

Stoke Gabriel

STOKE GABRIEL, in the hundred of Haytor and in the deanery of Ipplepen, lies on the Dart, about four miles from Totnes, and five from Dartmouth. The villages of Watton and Ash are in this parish.

Sandridge, in this parish, gave name to a family, who in the reign of Edward III. were succeeded by the Pomeroys, whose seat it continued to be in the last century: one of the co-heiresses of Pomeroy brought it to Gilbert. It was purchased of the last-mentioned family in 1770, by the late Lord Ashburton, and now belongs to his son, the present lord, under whom it is held on lease, by Robert William Newman, Esq. The manor of Wadeton, or Watton, gave name to a family, from whom it passed, by successive female heirs, to Fissacre and Holway. The last-mentioned family continued possessed of it in the reign of Charles I. It was afterwards successively in Shepheard and Rogers, and is now the property of Henry Studdy, Esq.

The chancellor of the church of Exeter is appropriator of the great tithes; the dean and chapter are patrons of the vicarage, which is in their peculiar jurisdiction. There was formerly a chantry chapel at Watton, founded by the Holways, and endowed with lands, valued, in 1547, at 1l. 9s. 7d. per annum.

Captain John Davies, a celebrated navigator, who attempted the discovery of the north-west passage, and gave name to Davies's Straits, was born at Sandridge, in the parish of Stoke Gabriel, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Stoke-in-Teignhead

STOKE-IN-TEIGNHEAD, commonly written STOKE IN TINGHEAD, in the hundred of Wonford and in the deanery of Kenne, lies about four miles from Newton Abbot. The villages of Higher and Lower Gabwell, Higher and Lower Rocombe, Maidencombe, part of Ringmore, and part of Shaldon, are in this parish.

The manor belonged, in the reign of Henry III., to the family of Fitzpayne: Sir Robert Fitzpayne sold it to Sir John Stowford, who was made chief baron of the Exchequer in 1346: from his family it passed, by successive female heirs, to Brightly, Cornu, and Speccot. It was afterwards successively in Scawen, Nicholls, and Trehawke. John Trehawke, Esq., who died about 1790, bequeathed it to Samuel Kekewich, Esq., the present proprietor. The lords of this manor had formerly the power of inflicting capital punishment. (fn. 13)

The manor of Maidencombe was in the family of De Cadiho, in the reign of Henry II. Henry Tregoz held it in 1274, under the Courtenays (fn. 14) : it was afterwards, for some descents, in the family of Bittlesgate, who sold it to Knoll, in the early part of the fifteenth century. Towards the latter part of the same century, it was purchased of the Knolls by Earl Rivers. It was afterwards in the Arscotts, who sold it to Speccot; Sir John Speccot was possessed of it in 1659; from the Speccots it passed by successive female heirs to Hals and Trelawney. (fn. 15) This manor is now the property of Elias Blackaller, John Blackaller, and others.

A moiety of the manor of Higher Rocombe came to the family of Flamank, by marriage with Knowling. This is now, under the will of the late Rev. William Flamank, the property of Mrs. Harvey, wife of Mr. Lawrence Harvey, of Newton Abbot: the other moiety is the property of Thomas Rowe, Esq., of Shaldon. The family of Andrews had the chief estate in Lower Rocombe, in which they were succeeded by the Necks. The manor of Rocombe Cadyho was held, in 1274, by Ralph Fitzwilliam, under the Courtenays. (fn. 16) This estate, called the manor of Rocombe Hugh, or Cadhew, is now the property of Mr. Henry Hearder.

The barton of Teign Harvey, or Tingharvey, gave name to a family, by whom it was sold to Beauchamp, in the reign of Edward I. It afterwards passed successively, sometimes by sale, sometimes by inheritance, to Pomeroy, Hurst, Bodley, Yard, and Hele. Having been given by Mr. Elize Hele, to charitable uses, it is now vested in the Chamber of Exeter, as trustees. The lease has been a considerable time in the family of Bradford, and is now vested in the Rev. — Bradford of Newton Abbot.

Mr. Incledon's Church Notes, taken about the year 1775, mention the tomb of John Symons, canon of Exeter, 1497. The Bishop of Exeter is patron of the rectory.

Mr. Gregory Andrews, in 1740, gave a rent-charge of 30s. per annum, a part of which was appropriated to the instruction of poor children: the whole is now applied to this purpose.

Stoke Rivers

STOKE RIVERS, in the hundred and deanery of Sherwell, lies about seven miles from Barnstaple.

Baldwin de Rivers, Earl of Devon, gave this manor to Philip de Soleny, from whose family it passed, by successive female heirs, to Champernowne, Willington, Beaumont, and Chi Chester: it is now the property of Sir Arthur Chichester, Bart.

In the parish-church are memorials of the families of Joce (1686—1748) and Parminter (1690—1718). The Rev. Charles Hiern, the present incumbent, is patron of the rectory.

Stokenham, alias Stockingham

STOKENHAM, alias STOCKINGHAM, in the hundred of Coleridge and in the deanery of Woodleigh, lies on the south coast, about eight miles from Dartmouth, and five from Kingsbridge. The villages of Chillington, Beeson, Torcross, and part of Frogmore, are in this parish.

The manor belonged, in the reign of King John to Matthew Fitzherbert: it continued several generations in his descendants by the name of Fitzmatthew, Fitzherbert, and Fitzjohn. Matthew Fitzjohn, the last of this family, was summoned to parliament as a baron. Dying without issue, he gave the inheritance of all his lands to the King, (Edward I.) The manor was then held under the Courtenays, as of the honor of Plympton. King Edward I. gave it to Ralph de Monthermer, his son-inlaw, to be held of the crown, of which the Earl of Devon complained in a petition to parliament, and obtained redress. From Monthermer this manor descended through the families of Montacute and Poole to Hastings Earl of Huntingdon, who sold it to the Ameridiths. Both Sir William Pole and Risdon state that this manor was dismembered; Risdon says by the Earl of Huntingdon; Sir William Pole, by John Ameridith, son of Edward, who purchased the estate. The royalty appears, nevertheless, to have been retained, the manor of Stokenham being now vested in R. W. Newman, Esq., who purchased it of George Cary, Esq., of Tor Abbey.

The manor of Stokenham Priory belonged to Sir Gregory Norton, Bart., one of the Regicides. In 1685 Sir Henry Norton, of Stokenham, brother of Sir John Norton, Bart., of Rotherfield, in Hampshire, bequeathed this estate to his nephew, Henry Nelson, Esq., son of William Nelson, Esq., of Chaddleworth, Berks. It was purchased of Norton Nelson, Esq., by the Holdsworth family, and is now the property of A. H. Holdsworth, Esq.

Widdecomb, in this parish, was a seat of the Heles. Arthur Holdsworth, Esq., bought it in the early part of the last century, and rebuilt the house about the year 1725. It is now the property and seat of his descendant and namesake, by whom the house has been enlarged, and the place much improved.

Coleridge, in this parish, is the property and was some time the residence of Michael Allen, Esq., by marriage with Cornish. Stokely belonged to the family of Roberts, of whom it was purchased by Lydstone Newman, Esq. Mr. Newman has built a house for his own residence near the old mansion.

In the parish-church are memorials of the families of Somaster (fn. 17) , Holdsworth (fn. 18) , and Strode (fn. 19) , and the monument of Agnes, wife of Michael Allen, Esq., "erected by her husband, one son and nine daughters."

The church of Stokenham was given by the Earl of Salisbury, and Alice, his countess, to the priory of Bisham, in Buckinghamshire. The impropriate tithes now belong to A. H. Holdsworth, Esq. The vicarage is in the gift of the crown.

In the year 1715 the Presbyterians had a meeting-house at Stokenham, which still exists: the congregation are now called Independent Calvinists.

East Stonehouse

EAST STONEHOUSE, in the hundred of Roborough and in the deanery of Plympton, lies between Plymouth and Plymouth Dock. It has been recognised as a separate parish by act of parliament.

The manor of East Stonehouse (fn. 20) , said to have been anciently called Hippeston, belonged to the family of Stonehouse, from whom it passed to Durnford, and with the heiress of Durnford to Edgecumbe. It is now the property of the Earl of Mount Edgecumbe. The Stonehouse family had a seat here. Sir William Pole says, that from a single private house it had become in his time a convenient big town, well inhabited. It has since very much increased. In 1801 it contained 3407; in 1811, 5174 inhabitants, according to the returns given in to parliament at those periods.

In 1784 the Plymouth division of marines was first stationed at Stonehouse, in barracks then lately built for their reception. They are capable of accommodating about 600 men.

Other barracks for infantry, called the Long-room barracks, were constructed during the late war, capable of holding 950 men. The Longroom, which was formerly an assembly-room, was converted into a messroom. Near these barracks are two batteries, called the Eastern and and Western King batteries, commanding the pass between St. Nicholas island and the shore, and the entrance into Hamoaze.

Adjoining to Stonehouse is the Royal Naval Hospital, containing 60 wards, and capable of accommodating above 900 patients. It being situated on Stonehouse creek, the sick are conveyed immediately from their ships to the hospital, without being exposed to the inconvenience of any conveyance by land.

There is now a weekly market at Stonehouse for provisions on Wednesday, and fairs on the first Wednesday in May and the second Wednesday in September, and the following day.

The old chapel at Stonehouse was rebuilt in 1787. In the new church is the monument (by Rouw) of Thomas Parlby, Esq., 1802; and that of John Basset Balderstone, Esq., commander of his Majesty's ship Parthian, 1808. In the church-yard are the tombs of Alexander Leslie, Lord Newark, 1791; Captain William Swaffield, R.N., blown up in the Amphion in Hamoaze, 1796; Lieutenant William Burke, mortally wounded July 21., 1801, in boarding La Chevrette, a French corvette, near Brest; Norton Joseph Knatchbull, son of Sir Edward Knatchbull, Bart., 1801; Dame Anne, relict of Sir John Dalston, Bart., 1801; and Rear-Admiral James Andrew Worth, 1807.

The Independent Calvinists have a meeting-house at Stonehouse; there are chapels also for the Roman Catholics, Baptists, and Wesleyan Methodists. The Roman Catholic chapel was opened in 1807.

There is no endowed school in this parish, but about 200 children are educated in a school conducted on Dr. Bell's system, supported by subscription; and about 230 in schools supported by the dissenters.

Stoodley, Stodeleigh, or Studley

STOODLEY, STODELEIGH, or STUDLEY, in the hundred of Witheridge and in the deanery of South Molton, lies about seven miles from Tiverton.

The manor was, at an early period, successively in the families of Champeaux and Marchant. The latter sold it to Fitzpayne in the reign of Edward III. From Fitzpayne it passed, by successive female heirs, to the families of Anstill, Kelly, and Carew.

The manors of East and West Stoodleigh were purchased of James Bernard, Esq., who possessed them in right of his wife, (the heiress of Carew of Crowcombe) about the year 1779, by Matthew Brickdale, Esq. M.P. Mr. Brickdale's son sold these estates, in 1819, to John Nicholas Fazakerly, Esq., M. P., who resides at Stoodleigh in the summer season.

The family of Balistarius, or Alabaster, possessed the manors of Blackworthy, Whiteknoll, and Warbrightsly or Warbrightsleigh, alias Halrudge, in this parish. After five generations, they passed with its heiress to Sachville. The last of the Sachville family conveyed them to his mother, and her heirs by her second husband John Crewkerne; and they passed with one of the co-heiresses of Crewkerne, to Broughton. The last of this family died in 1734. These manors are now the property of John Edward Teale, Esq., in whose family they have been for a considerable time. The barton of Warbrightsly belongs to the Rev. John Palmer, of Torrington.

There is an ancient beacon on the top of Warbrightsleigh hill, said to have been erected by order of King Edward II. (fn. 21)

Mr. Fazakerly is patron of the rectory.

Stowford

STOWFORD, in the hundred of Lifton and in the deanery of Tavistock, lies about ten miles from Tavistock, and about twelve from Oakhampton. Stow-end, Stowford-barton, and Spry-town, are small villages in this parish.

The manor belonged, in the reign of Henry II., to the family of Hiwis, who possessed it for several generations. This, with the manor of Milford, had been long in the family of Harris, till it was lately exchanged by William Arundell Harris, Esq., of Castlepark, with Mr. Harris, of Hayne, for some estates in Lifton.

Stone and Hayne, in this parish, have been, for many generations, in the family of Harris. John Harris married the heiress of Stone, in the reign of Henry VI.; his descendant married the heiress of Hayne, of Hayne, which has, ever since that marriage, been the seat of this branch of the family. Christopher Harris, Esq., the last heir male of this branch, died in 1775, leaving two daughters, one of whom married Isaac Donithorne, Esq., (now Harris) and in right of his wife proprietor of these estates and patron of the rectory of Stowford.

In the parish-church are monuments of the family of Harris. (fn. 22) That of Christopher Harris, Esq., who died in 1718, has his effigies in marble, habited as a Roman Emperor. Margaret Doyle, widow, gave, in 1777, the sum of 200l., now producing 9l. per annum, for teaching poor children.

Sutcombe

SUTCOMBE, in the hundred of Black Torrington and in the deanery of Holsworthy, lies about 5 miles from Holsworthy.

The manor of Sutcombe belonged, in the reign of Henry II., to the family of Merton, whose heiress brought it to the Stawells. It is now the property of Earl Stanhope, by inheritance from the Ridgways. (fn. 23) Theoborough, or Thuborough, belonged to the family of De Esse from a very early period to the reign of Richard II., after which it passed by successive female heirs to Giffard and Prideaux. It was purchased of the last-mentioned family (before the year 1773) (fn. 24) by the grandfather of Mr. William Allen, the present proprietor, who resides here as occupier of the farm.

In the parish-church are memorials of the Prideaux family (fn. 25) , and of Charles Davie, Esq., of Bideford, 1742. The Rev. William Holland Coham is patron of the rectory. Sir William Morice, Secretary of State to King Charles II., founded an almshouse at Sutcombe for six poor people, and endowed it with lands, now let at 31l. per annum.

Swimbridge

SWIMBRIDGE, in the hundred of South Molton and in the deanery of Barnstaple, lies on the road from South Molton to Barnstaple, about seven miles from the latter, and five from the former. The villages of Newland and Accot are in this parish.

The manor of Swimbridge belongs to the Duke of Bedford. Ernsborough gave name to a family who possessed that manor at an early period. They were succeeded by the Flavells, whose heiress brought it to Sir John Mules, a younger son of the Lord Mules, and it continued in his family for several generations. One of the co-heiresses of the last Sir John Mules brought it to Dabernon, and the heiress of Dabernon to Gifford. (fn. 26) In 1773, it was the joint property of Mr. Lewis Somerville and William Berry, Esq., of West Buckland. This estate has been for some time in the family of Hole, and is now the property of Henry Hole, Esq., of Ebberly. In Risdon's time there were considerable remains of the manor-house: a correspondent of Mr. Chapple's speaks of a tower remaining in 1773. Dr. Cowell, the eminent civilian, author of "The Interpreter," was born at Ernsborough about the year 1554.

Dinington, in this parish, now called and written Doniton, gave name to a family who possessed it at an early period. It was afterwards successively in the families of Handford, Chichester, and Bury, and is now the property and seat of Richard Incledon Bury, Esq., Vice-Admiral of the Blue. The barton of Hannaford, which was some time in the family of Southcomb, is now the property of Mrs. Northcote, whose father was of that family.

The parish-church is a handsome Gothic structure, with a spire, and has a rich screen in fine preservation. The north aisle, called St. Bridgett's chapel, was built by Sir John Mules, and has his arms on the ceiling. There are monuments and memorials of the families of Handford (fn. 27) , Rosier (fn. 28) , Chichester (fn. 29) , Cutcliffe (fn. 30) , and Berry. (fn. 31) The church was formerly esteemed a chapel of Bishop's Tawton. The dean of Exeter is appropriator of the great tithes, and patron of the vicarage.

There was formerly a chapel at Accot, of which there are some small remains.

Risdon says that St. Hieritha, who was contemporary with Thomas à Becket, was born at Stowford in this parish.

South Sydenham, or Sydenham Damarell

SOUTH SYDENHAM, or SYDENHAAI DAMARELL, in the hundred of Lifton and in the deanery of Tavistock, lies about five miles from Tavistock. The villages of Townlake, Partington, and Derriton, are in this parish.

The Damarells were lords of the manor in the reign of Edward I. At a later period the manor was, for several generations, in the Tremaynes. It was sold by the late Arthur Tremayne, Esq., in the year 1802, to Richard Eales, Esq., by whom the estate was disposed of in lots. The manor is now the property of John Carpenter, Esq., of Mount Tavy.

In the parish-church are monuments of the families of Richards (fn. 32) and Freeman. (fn. 33) Mr. Carpenter is patron of the rectory. There was formerly a chapel at Derriton, of which there are some traces.

The barton of Panson, in St. Giles' in the Heath (fn. 34) , pays to the rector of this parish the sum of 14s. 8d., pursuant to an agreement made in 1630 between Percival Carwithen and the then rector. Risdon says that Panson, although so far distant, is in this parish; but I am informed, on enquiry, that it is now deemed to be in the parish of St. Giles'. Certain lands in Maristow, formerly belonging to the Carwithens, were sold to Sir Thomas Wise, reserving 13s. 10d., payable on the communion table before 12 at noon on Easter-Monday, which custom is still kept up.

Footnotes

1 The right was acknowledged, the services defined, and the fees settled, in 1308, upon occasion of a difference which arose concerning them at Bishop Stapledon's installation. The agreement is printed at length in Izacke's Memorials of the City of Exeter, p. 33—35. The lord of the manor of Slapton was to meet the bishop at the east gate, to precede him and keep off the press of the people, thence to the choir of the cathedral; at the feast, to serve in the first mess at the bishop's own table; to have for his fees four silver dishes, two saltcellars, one cup out of which the bishop should drink, one wine-pot, one spoon, and two basins wherein the bishop should wash; all which vessels to be of silver: the services to be performed in person, unless the lord should be prevented by sickness, in which case he was to provide for a deputy some worshipful knight; otherwise, not to be entitled to any fees; the lord of the manor to have hay and provender for his horses, and those of his attendants, and his livery of wine and candles.
2 This parish also is so called in ancient ecclesiastical surveys.
3 Peter Beavis, Esq., 1656; Peter Beavis, Esq., 1718; Richard Beavis, Esq., 1782.
4 Hundred Roll.
5 Hundred Roll.
6 Ibid.
7 Sprigge's England's Recovery, p. 151.
8 It constitutes the chief population of the parish, which, in 1801, contained 23,747; in 1811, 30,083; and in 1821, 33,137 inhabitants.
9 From the Rev. Mr. Worsley, of Plymouth, assisted by a friend at Plymouth Dock.
10 So called from Mr. James Relly. See Evans's Sketch of Religions.
11 See p. 403.
12 These have no minister, but meet to sing and pray, and read the works of the celebrated Joanna Southcote, their foundress.
13 Hundred Roll.
14 Ibid.
15 A small part of this estate passed to Miss May and her sisters, by the same title as Stapledon, but the manor had been alienated after Mrs. Trelawney's death.
16 Hundred Roll.
17 John Somaster, Gent., 1681.
18 Arthur Holdsworth, Esq., 1787.
19 William Strode, Esq., 1802.
20 Robert Bastard held the manor of "Stanhous" in demesne at the time of the Domesday survey.
21 Risdon.
22 William Harris, Esq., of Kynegie, 1661; Christopher Harris, Esq., his son and heir, and heir-at-law of Sir Arthur Harris, Bart., 1687; William Harris, son and heir of Christopher, 1700; John Harris. Esq., Master of the Household to George II. and III., ob. 1767.
23 As descended from Thomas Pitt, Esq., who married one of the co-heiresses of Ridgway, Earl of Londonderry.
24 Chapple's Collections.
25 Jonathan Prideaux, Esq., of Thuborough (no date); John Prideaux, Esq., of Soldon, 1706; Anne, daughter and heir of Humphrey Prideaux, Esq., of Soldon, 1703.
26 Westcote.
27 — Handford, 1584; and Hugh Handford, 1619.
28 John Rosier, Gent., 1658; Lewis Rosier, Gent., 1676.
Inscription on the monument of John Rosier:—
"To the memory of John Rosier, Gent., one of the Attornyes of the Court of Comon Bench, and an Auntient of the Hono. Societie of Lyons Inn; who died the 25th day of December, 1658."
"Loe, with a warrant seald by God's decree,
Death, his grim Serjeant, hath arrested mee;
No bayle was to be given, no law could saue
My body from the prison of the graue.
Yet by the Gospell, my poore Soule had got
A supersedeas, and death seazd it not,
And for my downcast Body, here it lyes,
A prisoner of hope it shall arise.
Faith doth assure mee, God of his great loue
In Christ, will send a writt for my remoue;
And sett my Body, as my Soule is, free,
With Christ in heaven: Come glorious Libertie."
29 Tristram Chichester, 1654; Arthur Chichester, of East Stowford, 1687; Henry Chichester, 1730; Susan, his first wife, daughter of Chichester, of Hall, 1708; and his second wife, daughter of Cornwall, 1713.
30 Charles Cutcliffe, of Dammage (no date, but he was buried in 1674), with his portrait in oil on board; he was son of John Cutcliffe, by Eleanor Chichester, of Swimbridge, and his sister, the wife of Henry Chichester, died in 1721; William Mayne, (who married a daughter of Chichester, of Swimbridge,) 1759.
31 Berry, of Kerscot and Cobbaton, in Swimbridge (1778—1799).
32 John Richards, son and heir of John Richards, 1634.
33 Joseph Freeman, Esq., 1781; Richard Yeo Freeman, Esq., 1807.
34 See the account of St. Giles' for the singular custom said to have been formerly connected with this estate.