Allerthorpe - Allonby

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

37-39

Citation Show another format:

'Allerthorpe - Allonby', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 37-39. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50751 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Allerthorpe

ALLERTHORPE, a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing, with the townships of Allerthorpe and Waplington, 199 inhabitants, of whom 154 are in the township of Allerthorpe, 1½ mile (S. W. by W.) from Pocklington. The general surface of the parish is flat and well wooded. It consists of 1543a. 1r. 33p., of which about 670 acres are arable, 420 meadow or pasture, and 450 common land tithe-free; the soil is of a light and various quality, but chiefly sandy. On the east the parish is bounded by the Pocklington canal, and it is also contiguous to the road between York and Market-Weighton. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Thornton: the appropriate tithes have been commuted for £246. 2. 6., and the vicarial for £73. 12.; there are a glebe-house and 3 acres of glebe. In the church is a very fine font.

Allerthorpe, with Swainby, N. riding of York.—See Swainby.

ALLERTHORPE, with Swainby, N. riding of York.—See Swainby.

Allerton

ALLERTON, a township, in the parish of Childwall, union and hundred of West Derby, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 5¼ miles (S. E.) from Liverpool; containing in 1846 about 800 inhabitants. At the time of the Domesday survey, three thanes held "Alretune;" which was in the possession of Geoffrey de Chetham in the reign of Henry III., and of the Lathoms in that of Henry VIII. It was sold in 1670 to the Percivals, who in 1732 sold it to the Hardmans; and from them it was purchased by Messrs. Clegg and Roscoe. The township comprises 1531 acres, and consists partly of a luxuriant vale, and partly of gentlyrising hills, which command fine views of the river Mersey at its widest part, with portions of Cheshire and North Wales. The air is salubrious, and the scenery adorned with wood; the soil is of various quality, in some parts sandy, and in others a stiff clay. Allerton Hall was until 1816 the residence of William Roscoe, the elegant historian of Leo X., and is now the seat of Pattison Ellames, Esq.: the apartments contain numerous valuable paintings, and a beautiful marble statue of Sappho, by John Gibson, of Rome. Wyncote is the residence of Joseph Shipley, Esq.; and Allerton Priory, of Theodore Woolman Rathbone, Esq. Here is a large Druidical monument called Calder Stones, in digging round which, more than sixty years ago, urns of coarse clay were found, containing human bones: the stones were surrounded with a neat iron palisade in 1845; and not far distant is the residence of Joseph N. Walker, Esq., named, after them, Calderstones. There is a quarry of red sandstone. The tithes have been commuted for £228 payable to the lessee of the Bishop of Chester, and £43 payable to the vicar of the parish. A church was erected in 1848, at a cost of £5000, by James Holme, Esq.; it is in the early English style, with a tower and spire, and, standing on rising ground, is a picturesque and commanding object. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of Mr. Holme.

Allerton

ALLERTON, a township, in the ecclesiastical district of Wilsden, parish and union of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 4 miles (W. N. W.) from Bradford; containing 1914 inhabitants. This township is part of the ancient manor of Allerton-cum-Wilsden, and comprises by measurement 1872 acres. A very considerable portion of waste has, under the provisions of an act of parliament, obtained in 1840, by Mrs. Ferrand, the owner of the manor, in concurrence with the principal freeholders, been inclosed, and is rapidly coming into profitable cultivation. Of the whole land, about 1100 acres are meadow and pasture, 550 arable, and 40 wood and plantation; the soil is not unfertile, and the substratum is chiefly coal and freestone of good quality; the surface is varied. There are several ancient mansions, formerly the seats of distinguished families, of which Crossley, Shuttleworth, and Allerton Halls, are still remaining; Dean House, the asylum of the celebrated Oliver Heywood, during the times of the Tudors and Stuarts, is now divided into tenements. The township consists chiefly of scattered houses, and the inhabitants are principally employed in the worsted manufacture, and in coal-mines and quarries. There are places of worship for General Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans.

Allerton-Bywater

ALLERTON-BYWATER, a township, in the parish of Kippax, Lower division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 4¾ miles (N. W.) from Pontefract; containing 490 inhabitants. This place comprises about 870 acres, and is situated at the confluence of the rivers Aire and Calder, where extensive wharfs and stations have been constructed by the Aire and Calder Company: part of the houses near the bridge form a suburb of Castleford. Large glass-works have been established. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, by an inclosure act, in 1803.

Allerton, Chapel

ALLERTON, CHAPEL, a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Bempstone, E. division of Somerset, 3 miles (S.) from Cross; containing 331 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 8. 4.; net income, £223; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Wells. There are 15 acres of glebe. The church is a small edifice, formerly a chapel to Wedmore.

Allerton, Chapel, W. riding of the county of York.—See Chapel-Allerton.

ALLERTON, CHAPEL, W. riding of the county of York.—See Chapel-Allerton.

Allerton-Mauleverer (St. Martin)

ALLERTON-MAULEVERER (St. Martin), a parish, in the Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (E.) from Knaresborough; containing 277 inhabitants, of whom 258 are in the township of Allerton-Mauleverer with Hopperton. This place obtained its distinguishing name from the family of Mauleverer, one of whom, named Richard, in the reign of Henry II. founded here an alien priory of Benedictine monks, the revenue of which was given by Henry VI. to King's College, Cambridge. The parish is wholly the property of Lord Stourton; and comprises 2170 acres, of which 1180 are arable, 820 meadow and pasture, and 170 woodland and plantations. The mansion here, which, with the estate, was purchased by his lordship's grandfather for £163,800, is a handsome structure in the Grecian style; and attached to it is a neat Roman Catholic chapel. The village is pleasantly situated about half a mile from the great road between London and Edinburgh. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £65; patron, Lord Stourton. The church is an ancient cruciform structure. The late Duke of York resided here in 1786, 1787, and 1789.

Allerton, North.—See Northallerton.

ALLERTON, NORTH.—See Northallerton.

Allesley, or Awesley (All Saints)

ALLESLEY, or Awesley (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Meriden, Kirkby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) from Coventry, on the road to Birmingham; containing 963 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 4155a. 3r. 30p., of which 1213 acres are arable, 2453 pasture, and 171 woodland; the land is in good cultivation, the surrounding scenery is pleasingly varied, and the village neatly built. Sandstone is quarried for rough building purposes. The Rev. Edward Neale is lord of the manor. Fairs are held for cattle on February 5th, March 4th, June 17th, August 7th, September 4th, October 7th, and December 11th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 18. 9.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. W. T. Bree: the tithes have been commuted for £786, and the glebe comprises nearly 40 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the early and later Norman styles, with modern additions in bad taste: a gallery was erected in 1838. £43 per annum, derived from land and houses in Meriden and Allesley, have been bequeathed for beautifying the church. There is a free school for boys, towards which Mrs. Flint, in 1705, gave land producing £42. 9. per annum, and a house for the master; a girls' school is supported by subscription. The sum of £16 yearly, left by an unknown benefactor, is distributed among the poor; and there are various other small benefactions. The moat and mound of an ancient castle are visible at the rear of the Hall. Fossil wood of a siliceous kind is dug up from the gravel.

Allestree (St. Andrew)

ALLESTREE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Belper, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 2 miles (N.) from Derby; containing 507 inhabitants. The family of Alestrey or Alastre, so called from this place, are mentioned in deeds of the thirteenth century; they resided in the village, and were at that time retainers to the Lords Audley. At the period of the visitation of 1634, the elder branch had been settled at Turnditch; but it probably was extinct before the visitation of 1662, when the younger branch only, settled at Alvaston, is named. The parish lies on the road from Derby to Matlock, and comprises 1030 acres, whereof 900 are pasture, 80 arable, and 50 woodland; the soil is loam and marl; the land is elevated, and the undulations of the surface are beautiful. The river Derwent flows on the east. The living is a perpetual curacy, united to the vicarage of Mackworth: the church is an ancient structure, with a square tower, and contains several monuments of the Mundys; the sittings are 300 in number. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Some schools, for which buildings were erected by William Evans, Esq., of Allestree Hall, are supported by that gentleman.

Allexton.—See Alexton.

ALLEXTON.—See Alexton.

Allhallows

ALLHALLOWS, a parish, in the union of Wigton, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 6¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Wigton; comprising by admeasurement 1860 acres, and containing 235 inhabitants. This place, which was anciently a chapelry in the parish of Aspatria, is bounded on the south by the river Ellen; and contains some quarries of freestone and limestone, and a vein of coal of inferior quality. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Carlisle. The tithes were partially commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1817. A little southward of Whitehall is an intrenchment twenty-eight yards square, surrounded by a ditch.

Allhallows

ALLHALLOWS, a parish, in the union and hundred of Hoo, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 9 miles (N. E.) from Rochester; containing 268 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north by the Thames, and comprises 2460 acres, of which 300 are marsh, and 23 wood. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 7. 11., and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Rochester: the appropriate tithes, belonging to the Dean and Chapter, have been commuted for £620, with a glebe of 11 acres, and those of the incumbent for £185, with a glebe of 39 acres.

Allington (St. Swithin)

ALLINGTON (St. Swithin), a parish, in the union of Bridport, hundred of Godderthorne, Bridport division of Dorset, ¾ of a mile (N. W.) from Bridport; containing 1545 inhabitants. This parish, formerly a chapelry in that of Bridport, comprises 582a. 3r. 5p., of which 281 acres are arable, 249 pasture, and 51 homesteads. The river Brid, or Birt, runs through the locality, which may be considered as a continuation of the town of Bridport, and is within the limits of the borough. Great quantities of hemp and flax are raised in the vicinity, and a manufacture of home and sail cloth is carried on, affording employment to a considerable number of persons. A fair for cheese and pedlery is held on the first Wednesday in August. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Rev. Henry Fox: the tithes have been commuted for £190. The church is in the Grecian style; it was erected in 1827, and contains 800 sittings, of which 400 are free. An hospital for lepers, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene, existed here, which, at the Dissolution in 1553, was valued at £7. 8. 4. An ancestor of the celebrated John Wesley was ejected from the ministry of Allington as a nonjuror.

Allington (St. Lawrence)

ALLINGTON (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Malling, hundred of Larkfield, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 1¾ mile (N. N. W.) from Maidstone; containing 49 inhabitants. It is situated on the western side of the Medway, nearly opposite Aylesford; and comprises 706 acres, of which 245 are woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 16. 8.; net income, £145, with a glebe-house, lately built; patron, the Earl of Romney. Sir Thomas Wyatt, a distinguished poet in the reign of Henry VIII., was born at Allington Castle, the remains of which have been converted into a farmhouse.

Allington

ALLINGTON, a tything, in the parish and union of South Stoneham, hundred of Mansbridge, Southampton and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 536 inhabitants.

Allington

ALLINGTON, a parish, in the union and hundred of Amesbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 3½ miles (E. S. E.) from Amesbury; containing 94 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 4.; net income, £236; patron, the Earl of Craven.

Allington

ALLINGTON, a tything, in the parish of Allcannings, union of Devizes, hundred of Swanborough, Devizes and N. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (E. N. E.) from Devizes; containing 188 inhabitants. The tithes belong to the Dean and Canons of Westminster. There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists.

Allington, East (St. Andrew)

ALLINGTON, EAST (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Kingsbridge, hundred of Stanborough, Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of Devon, 3½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Kingsbridge; containing 729 inhabitants, and comprising 2348 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £32. 2. 1., and in the patronage of Mrs. Fortescue: the tithes have been commuted for £485, and the glebe consists of 80 acres. In the church is a wooden screen, which, like the pulpit, is much enriched with carved work.

Allington, East (St. James)

ALLINGTON, EAST (St. James), a parish, in the union of Newark, wapentake of Winnibriggs and Threo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (N. W.) from Grantham; containing 276 inhabitants. The living is consolidated with a mediety of the rectory of Sedgebrook, to the incumbent of which an allotment of land was given as a commutation for the tithes of the manor, by an inclosure act, in 1793.

Allington, West, in the county of Devon.—See Alvington, West.

ALLINGTON, WEST, in the county of Devon.— See Alvington, West.

Allington, West (Holy Trinity)

ALLINGTON, WEST (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Newark, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 5½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Grantham; containing 120 inhabitants. In this parish is the seat of T. Earle Welby, Esq., a handsome edifice, partly in the Elizabethan style, and commanding a distant view of Foston and the city of Lincoln. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 13. 11½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £262.

Allithwaite, Lower

ALLITHWAITE, LOWER, a township, in the parish of Cartmel, union of Ulverstone, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (S.) from Cartmel; containing 807 inhabitants. This township has sometimes been named Cartmel Church Town. To the north, not far from the shore, are some remains of Wraysholme Tower, which was a fortified house, of strong masonry, in the 14th century: Abbot Hall, in the hamlet of Kents, is supposed to have been a residence of the priors of Cartmel. In some fields called Chapel Fields, human skeletons have been exhumed. The church and part of the town of Cartmel (which see) are in the township.

Allithwaite, Upper

ALLITHWAITE, UPPER, a township, in the parish of Cartmel, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 3¼ miles (N. E.) from Cartmel; containing 740 inhabitants. A conical rock in this township, called Castlehead, is supposed, from some imperial coins found on the spot, to have once had Roman inhabitants. It had the appearance of a rough neglected wood, till the late J. Wilkinson, Esq., the great iron-master, improved and adorned all around, by cutting paths, and planting trees and shrubs wherever the soil invited the hand of cultivation. In effecting these improvements, many relics of antiquity were found, rings, Roman money, fibulæ, ornaments, and fossils, and the bones of animals that no longer inhabit this country. At the foot of the rock is a house built by Mr. Wilkinson, and afterwards occupied by Mr. Legh, who married his daughter; it is now in the possession of Robert Wright, Esq. At a short distance from it is a pyramidical mausoleum of iron, twenty tons in weight, which, until 1828, pressed the mortal remains of its founder: in that year, however, the remains of Mr. Wilkinson were removed to the churchyard of Lindale.

Allonby

ALLONBY, a chapelry, in the parish of Bromfield, union of Wigton, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 9 miles (N. N. W.) from Cockermouth; containing 811 inhabitants. The village, comprising about 200 houses, is situated on the coast of Allonby bay, which opens to the Solway Firth and the Irish Sea; and is much frequented as a bathingplace, the sands being extremely smooth and firm. It was noted for a herring-fishery, but this has greatly declined, owing to the herrings having almost totally deserted the neighbouring sea; a few of the inhabitants are, however, still occupied in fishing. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £94; patron, the Vicar of Bromfield. The chapel, dedicated to Christ, was built at the expense of Dr. Thomlinson and some relatives, in 1744; and a school was endowed in 1755, by Mrs. Thomlinson, his relict, with £100, since laid out in land producing £8 per annum. There is a place of worship for the Society of Friends. Captain Joseph Huddart, F.R.S., an eminent naval engineer and hydrographer, was born here in 1741, and in the chapel is a handsome monument erected to his memory, at a cost of £500.