Areley - Arncott

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

69-73

Citation Show another format:

'Areley - Arncott', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 69-73. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50759&strquery=Arlington+(St.+Pancras) Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Areley, King's, or Lower Areley (St. Bartholomew)

ARELEY, KING'S, or Lower Areley (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Martley, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, the HundredHouse and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, ½ a mile (S. W. by W.) from Stourport; containing 423 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1449 acres, whereof two-thirds are arable and the remainder pasture, with the exception of sixty acres of common or waste. It is separated from Stourport by the river Severn, and fully partakes of the beauty of the surrounding district; the general surface is irregular, and the higher grounds are clothed with wood. Across the western boundary of the parish, nearly from north to south, a range of hills or high grounds extends from Stagberry, in the parish of Ribbesford, towards the Abberley hills: from the base of these hills the land generally slopes to the Severn. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the patronage of the Rector of Martley: the tithes have been commuted for £358, and there is a glebe of 41 acres, with a house. The church is situated on a considerable eminence commanding a fine prospect and nearly overhanging the river, which flows through a rich valley at the base. In the burialground is a singular sepulchral monument, of the date of about 1690, supposed to commemorate Sir Harry Coningsby, of Hampton Court, who lived in seclusion in this parish, in consequence of the loss of his only child.

Areley, Upper (St. Peter)

ARELEY, UPPER (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Kidderminster, S. division of the hundred of Seisdon and of the county of Stafford, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Bewdley; containing 667 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3803a. 3r. 12p., whereof 58 acres are common or waste; the surface is undulated, the soil generally good, and the scenery very fine. A thin stratum of coal is worked; and there are quarries of red freestone, of which large blocks are raised for building, and which is also used for grindstones and millstones. Areley Castle, the seat of the late Earl of Mountnorris, who, when Viscount Valentia, published his interesting travels in the east, is now the residence of his nephew, A. L. Annesley, Esq., who succeeded to his English and Irish estates. The village occupies a romantic situation near the margin of the river Severn. The living is a perpetual curacy; patron and impropriator, Mr. Annesley; incumbent, the Rev. John Allen. The great tithes have been commuted for £391. 7., and those of the incumbent for £305: the impropriate glebe consists of 199 acres; the glebe belonging to the incumbent contains about half an acre, with a good house. The church, which is situated on an eminence commanding a fine prospect, was first built by Henry de Port, in the reign of Henry I., and was rebuilt in the time of Edward I.: the interior was renovated and beautified at the expense of the late Earl of Mountnorris, who also built a handsome school-house, with a residence for the master, and endowed the school with £21 per annum. In Areley wood are the remains of a Roman camp; at Hawkbatch a Roman town and bridge are said to have existed, and many Roman coins have been found in that part of the parish. There are mineral springs, which are said to be something like the Harrogate waters, and have been used for medicinal purposes.

Argam, or Ergam (St. John the Baptist)

ARGAM, or Ergam (St. John The Baptist), a parish, in the union of Bridlington, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 5½ miles (N. W.) from Bridlington; containing 30 inhabitants. The parish is situated near the road leading from Bridlington to Malton, and comprises by computation 510 acres of land. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4, and in the patronage of C. Grimston, Esq., with a net income of £21. The church was one of the chapels of Hunmanby, until it was appropriated to the abbey of Bardensey; few traces of it now remain.

Arkendale

ARKENDALE, a chapelry, in the parish of Knaresborough, Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 4 miles (N. E.) from Knaresborough; containing 261 inhabitants. This place comprises 1516a. 2r. 35p., of which more than two-thirds are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with 4½ acres of wood. The soil is partly sand, but mostly clay, producing good crops of wheat, barley, oats, and turnips; the surface is hilly, and picturesque, the higher grounds commanding extensive views. The village is situated at the distance of a mile from the Boroughbridge and Wetherby, and the Boroughbridge and Knaresborough, roads. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Knaresborough, with a net income of £90: the tithes of the manor were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1773, and a rent-charge of £107 has been lately awarded as a commutation for tithes. The chapel, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, was rebuilt in 1836, at a cost of about £750, raised by subscription, aided by a grant of £100 from the Incorporated Society; it is a handsome edifice of white brick and stone, in the early English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains 210 sittings, of which 144 are free. A parsonage-house, pleasantly situated on an eminence, was built in 1841. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Arkengarth-Dale, otherwise Arkendale (St. Mary)

ARKENGARTH-DALE, otherwise Arkendale (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 12 miles (W. by N.) from Richmond; containing 1243 inhabitants. This is a large moorland parish, the most interesting part of which is its picturesque dale, about eight miles long, and beautifully studded with rural hamlets, whereof the principal are Arkle, Booze, Eskeylith, Langthwaite, Whaw, Seal-houses, and Dale-head. It comprises by computation 14,256 acres; 3200 are pasture and meadow, 5 arable, 51 wood, 50 public road, and 10,950 common land. The district abounds in lead-ore, lying principally in high and bleak moors, in the vicinity of the Arkle rivulet, on whose south side the mountain called Water Crag rises 2186 feet above the level of the sea: the lead-mines are of great antiquity, some of them having been worked in the reign of King John, and they are still very productive. There are also extensive smelting-works, where more than 1000 tons of lead are made into ingots yearly; and two excellent slate-quarries are in operation. The road leading from Reeth, in Swaledale, to Kirkby-Stephen and Brough, in Westmorland, passes through the whole length of the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Sir John Lowther, Bart., the impropriator, with a net income of £123, and a house. The present church, built in 1818, stands about half a mile from the site of the old edifice, and is a neat stone structure capable of accommodating from 500 to 600 persons; the cost of its erection, between £2000 and £3000, was defrayed, partly by money bequeathed by the late George Brown, Esq., and partly by the Rev. John Gilpin. At Langthwaite are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans.

Arkesden (St. Mary)

ARKESDEN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Saffron-Walden, hundred of Uttlesford, N. division of Essex, 3 miles (E.) from Newport, and 9 miles (N.) from Bishop-Stortford; containing 498 inhabitants. It comprises 2297a. 2r. 28p.; the surface is undulated, the soil a heavy and tenacious clay. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £181; patron and impropriator, R. B. Wolfe, Esq. It was formerly endowed with a portion of the great tithes, which were commuted for land and a corn-rent, under an inclosure act, in 1814. The church, a spacious and handsome structure with a square embattled tower, in the later English style, is finely situated on the slope of a hill; the north aisle was built by Thomas Alderton, of London, who founded a chantry here in the reign of Hen. VII.

Arkholme, with Cawood

ARKHOLME, with Cawood, a chapelry, in the parish of Melling, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 10 miles (N. E.) from Lancaster, on the road to KirkbyLonsdale; containing 407 inhabitants. This place is mentioned in the Domesday survey. Roger de Monte Begon gave to the Cluniac priory of Thetford the wood called "Cainueda;" and in the reign of Edward I. Geoffrey de Nevill obtained the grant of a market and fair to be held in the township. It comprises 2756 acres, whereof 2466 are meadow and pasture, 160 arable, and 130 waste, forest, &c.; the surface is generally level, being part of the vale of the Lune, which river flows beautifully in this vicinity. Stone for building is quarried, and the population are employed in agriculture and the manufacture of baskets and other articles of osier-work, several osier-beds being found along the river. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £65, and a house; patron, the Vicar of Melling. The church is an ancient plain structure, with a belltower. A school is supported by subscription. Behind the church is a tumulus.

Arkleside

ARKLESIDE, a hamlet, in the township of Carlton-Highdale, parish of Coverham, union of Leyburn, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 8 miles (S. W.) from Middleham. The tithes belong to the incumbent of Coverham, the monks of which place had lands here, producing £6. 13. 4. per annum.

Arksey (All Saints)

ARKSEY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Doncaster; containing 1056 inhabitants, of whom 266 are in the hamlet of Arksey, and 697 in that of Bentley. The parish comprises the hamlets of Stockbridge, Almholm, Shaftholme, Bodles, Doncaster Bridge-End, and Scawthorpe; and consists of about 5220 acres of fertile land in a champaign district of rich loam: it is bounded on the east by the river Don, and watered by two of its tributary streams. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 6., and in the patronage of Sir William Bryan Cooke, Bart., the impropriator, with a net income of £113: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an inclosure act, in the 7th and 8th of George IV. The church consists of a nave, chancel, aisles, transepts, and a tower with a low spire rising from the centre; the interior is rich in heraldic insignia, and the windows have much stained glass in good preservation. The free grammar school here was built in pursuance of the will of Sir George Cooke, and has an endowment of £40 per annum, left by Sir Bryan Cooke in 1660. An almshouse for 12 poor inhabitants is endowed with £120 per annum.—See Bentley.

Arlecdon (St. Michael)

ARLECDON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 5¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Whitehaven; consisting of the townships of Arlecdon, Frizington, and Whillymoor; and containing 558 inhabitants, of whom 211 are in Arlecdon township. It comprises 5311a. 3r. 15p.; and possesses coal, iron-ore, limestone, and freestone. Fairs for cattle are held on April 24th, the first Friday in June, and Sept. 17th. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Chester; net income, £100. The tithes for the township of Arlecdon were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1819. The present church was consecrated Aug. 25th, 1829; divine service is also performed in a Sunday school, lately erected, and licensed by the bishop. On an estate called Cringlegill is a chalybeate spring, the water of which is stated to possess similar properties to that of Harrogate.

Arlescote

ARLESCOTE, a township, in the parish of Warmington, union of Banbury, Burton-Dasset division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 5½ miles (E. S. E.) from Kington; containing 43 inhabitants. This place was given soon after the Conquest to the Earl of Mellent, who bestowed a portion of it on the monks of Preaux. The manor, after the Dissolution, passed from the crown to the Andrews family.

Arleston, with Synfin

ARLESTON, with Synfin, a liberty, in the parish of Barrow, union of Shardlow, hundred of Appletree (though locally in the hundred of Repton and Gresley), S. division of the county of Derby,. 4½ miles (S. by W.) from Derby; containing 85 inhabitants. The manor of Arleston was conveyed, in 1426, to the Bothes, whose descendant died seised of it in 1519; it afterwards came to the Blounts, and from them to Sir John Harpur, ancestor of the Crewes. Synfin belonged in the reign of Edward I. to the family of Toke, who were succeeded by the Bothes; and this estate came also, in the reign of Charles I., to the ancestor of Sir John Crewe, Bart. Synfin moor, a large common, on which the Derby races were held, was inclosed about 1804.

Arleston

ARLESTON, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Wellington, hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop; containing 181 inhabitants.

Arley (St. Wilfrid)

ARLEY (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Nuneaton, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 8 miles (N. N. W.) from Coventry; containing 265 inhabitants. The parish is traversed by the road from Coventry to Tamworth, and comprises 1929a. 29p. of land, the greater portion of which is pasture and meadow; 140 acres are wood, and 20 common or waste. The soil is variable, some parts good, and some stiff clay; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque. Lime in considerable quantities, and stone for the roads, are obtained here. The chief proprietor is Alfred Ashley Vaughton, Esq., of Fillongley Lodge. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 0. 7½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. R. R. Vaughton: the tithes have been commuted for £336. 8., and the glebe consists of 74 acres. The church is an ancient edifice, with a square tower. £20 yearly out of lands producing upwards of £200 per annum, left by William Avery, and a donation of the interest of £600 in the new three-anda-half per cents., by John and Francis Holmes, go towards the support of a free school. A Sunday school is supported by the rector.

Arley, Upper, Stafford.—See Areley, Upper.

ARLEY, UPPER, Stafford.—See Areley, Upper.

Arlingham (St. Mary the Virgin)

ARLINGHAM (St. Mary The Virgin), a parish, in the union of Wheatenhurst, Upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 1½ mile (S. E. by E.) from Newnham; containing 793 inhabitants. The parish is situated on a nook of land formed by a curvature of the Severn, by which river it is bounded on three sides, and across which is a ferry to Newnham: from an eminence called Barrow hill is a very extensive and pleasing view. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £19. 7. 3½., and in the patronage of Mrs. Hodges, to whom also the impropriation belongs; net income, £193. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents, by an inclosure act, in 1801. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Mrs. Mary Yate, in 1765, endowed a school for boys and girls with a rent-charge of £40; she also gave an additional rent-charge of £40 for the benefit of the poor.

Arlington (St. James)

ARLINGTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Barnstaple, hundred of Sherwill, Braunton and N. divisions of Devon, 6¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Barnstaple; containing 206 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4000 acres, and is intersected by the river Yeo. Arlington Court, a spacious and handsome mansion in the Grecian-Doric style, is situated here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 18. 1½.; net income, £272; patron, J. P. Chichester, Esq. The church, which has lately been rebuilt by the patron, contains a beautiful monument in marble to one of the Carey family, and the figure of a female crowned.

Arlington

ARLINGTON, a tything, in the parish of Bibury, union of Northleach, hundred of Brightwell's-Barrow, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4¾ miles (N. W.) from Fairford; containing 371 inhabitants.

Arlington (St. Pancras)

ARLINGTON (St. Pancras), a parish, in the union of Hailsham, hundred of Longbridge, rape of Pevensey, E. division of Sussex, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Hailsham; containing 686 inhabitants. A priory of Black canons was founded at Michelham, in this parish, in honour of the Holy Trinity, by Gilbert de Aquila, in the reign of Henry III.; it continued to flourish till the Dissolution, when its revenue was estimated at £191. 19. 3.: the remains have been converted into a farmhouse, on the north side of which are various pillars and arches, still in tolerable preservation. The parish comprises 5100 acres by admeasurement. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 6. 11.; net income, £156; patron, the Prebendary of Woodhorne in the Cathedral of Chichester; impropriator, Mrs. Attree. The church is an ancient structure in the decorated English style. At Upper Dicker Common, in the parish, is a church dedicated to the Holy Trinity, to which a chapelry district was assigned in 1845, comprising parts of the parishes of Arlington, Chiddingly, and Hellingly: the patronage belongs to the Bishop. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In the hamlet of Milton is the site of Barlow Castle, overlooking the river Cuckmere.

Arlsey (St. Peter)

ARLSEY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Biggleswade, county of Bedford, 6 miles (S.) from Biggleswade; containing 820 inhabitants. This place is in the Domesday survey noticed as a markettown, and in 1270 Stephen Edworth, then lord of the manor, obtained a confirmation of the grant for its market, and a grant of a fair on the festival of St. Peter and St. Paul, both of which have been long discontinued. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Ivel, and on the west by the Hiz, both of which unite in the north-west extremity. It is intersected by the road from Baldock to Bedford, and comprises by measurement 2303 acres, of which about 1600 are arable, 500 pasture, 20 wood, and 50 common; the sub-soil is gravel and clay. The women and children are employed in the straw-plat manufacture. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the rectory of Astwick annexed, and valued in the king's books at £8 per annum; it is in the patronage of Mrs. Roger Smith. At the inclosure of the parish, 255 acres were allotted in lieu of tithes, and there are 15 acres of grass land round the glebehouse. The church is a neat edifice. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. At Etonbury, near the road to Baldock, are the remains of a Roman encampment; and a spot still called the Hermitage, was the site of an ancient religious house.

Armathwaite

ARMATHWAITE, a chapelry, in the parish of Hesket-in-the-Forest, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 5 miles (N. W.) from KirkOswald. The village is beautifully situated on the western bank of the Eden, over which is a good stone bridge of four arches. Armathwaite Castle, a handsome modern edifice, built on the site of an ancient fortress, occupies a rocky elevation, at the foot of which flows the Eden; in the reign of Henry VIII. it was, with the estate, the property of John Skelton, the poet-laureat. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £50; patrons, the Trustees of Mr. Milbourne, in whom also the impropriation is vested. The chapel was rebuilt by Richard Skelton in 1668, having for some time previously been used as a shed for cattle.

Armin

ARMIN, a chapelry, in the parish of Snaith, union of Goole, Lower division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 2 miles (N. N. W.) from Goole; containing 593 inhabitants. This chapelry, the name of which signifies the "mouth of the Aire," is bounded on the north-west by that river, and is situated on the road from Doncaster to Hull. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £71; patrons, the Earl of Beverley, and N. E. Yarburgh, Esq.; impropriator, the earl. The chapel is dedicated to St. David.

Arminghall (St. Mary)

ARMINGHALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (S. E. by S.) from Norwich; comprising by computation 650 acres, and containing 79 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £66; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Norwich, whose tithes have been commuted for £229. 10. The church is chiefly in the early English style, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a square tower. An old house near it has a very rich and curious porch, on the door of which is written, in ancient characters, "Pray for the soul of Master William Ely, who caused this to be made an hospital in the year 1487."

Armitage (St. John), with Handsacre

ARMITAGE (St. John), with Handsacre, a parish, in the union of Lichfield, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Rugeley; containing 967 inhabitants. This place was formerly called Hermitage, from a tradition that a hermit anciently resided in a sequestered spot between the church and the river Trent. The parish is intersected by the Grand Trunk canal, is skirted by the Trent, and lies on the main road from Lichfield to Uttoxeter, in a beautiful and fertile part of the county exceedingly well wooded; it comprises 1921a. 2r. 24p., whereof 821 acres are arable, 829 pasture, 100 wood, and 70 acres gardens. Bricks and tiles are made to some extent. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Lichfield; net income, £100, with a small glebe. The tithes formerly belonged to a canonry in Lichfield cathedral, which being suppressed, they have fallen to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; they have been commuted for £336. The body of the church was rebuilt, and a south aisle added, in the Norman style, in 1845, at a cost of £1500; the old porch, also, was restored: the font is curious, and very ancient. There is a place of worship for Independents; also a national school for boys and girls, established in 1839.— See Handsacre.

Armley

ARMLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Peter, liberty of the borough of Leeds, W. riding of York, 2½ miles (W. by N.) from Leeds; containing 5676 inhabitants. This chapelry comprises 939a. 1r. 18p.; the soil is tolerably fertile, and excellent building-stone abounds; the surface is boldly undulated, and from the east side, looking towards Headingley, the scenery is picturesque. Armley House is a noble mansion of the Ionic order, situated in an extensive and richly-wooded park. The old Hall, anciently the residence of the Hoptons, lords of the manor, is now a farmhouse. The village is situated on the west side of the river Aire, and extends for a considerable distance along the acclivities of the vale: the Leeds and Liverpool canal passes in a direction nearly parallel with the river, and also the new road from Stanningley to Leeds, completed in 1836. The inhabitants are employed in extensive woollen-mills. The chapel, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, and originally erected in the reign of Charles I., was rebuilt in 1835, at an expense of £1000, of which £300 were granted by the Incorporated Society, and the remainder raised by subscription; it contains 930 sittings. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Leeds, with a net income of £204, and a glebe-house. A Sunday evening lecture was established in 1841, and is supported at the sole expense of Mr. Gott; the lecturer has a liberal income, and a commodious house. The Dean and Chapter of Oxford receive a tithe rent-charge of £30. There are places of worship for Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Methodists of the New Connexion. Almshouses for 12 poor widows, and a national schoolroom for 500 children, were erected near the chapel in 1832, by the late Benjamin Gott, Esq.; they form a handsome range of buildings in the Elizabethan style. Above the village is a lofty eminence named Giant's hill, on which are the remains of some works supposed to have been a Danish fort; there were some others on two eminences called the Red and White War hills, but they were destroyed in the formation of the canal.

Armscott

ARMSCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of Newbold, union of Shipston-upon-Stour, Upper division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Blockley and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3 miles (N. by W.) from Shipston; containing 139 inhabitants, and comprising 714 acres. It is in the southern part of the parish, a short distance westward of the river Stour, and on the road from Chipping-Campden to Warwick.

Armston

ARMSTON, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of Polebrook, union of Oundle, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Oundle; containing 26 inhabitants, and comprising 784 acres. It is situated near the right bank of the river Nene, and in the south-western part of the parish.

Armthorpe (St. Mary)

ARMTHORPE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Doncaster, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 4 miles (E. N. E.) from Doncaster; containing, with the hamlet of Nutwell, 449 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book called Ernulfestorp, was the property of the monks of the abbey of Roche, who had a grange here, at which the official resided who managed this part of the estates of the establishment, and who was sometimes a brother of the house: they had also an officer called their forester. The parish comprises 3810 acres, and includes the farms of Holm-Wood and Waterton, the latter of which was long the seat of the ancient family of its own name, of whom several served the office of high sheriff, and one was master of the horse to Henry V. The village consists of scattered houses, and is situated on a declivity. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 18. 9., and in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £366: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, by an inclosure act, in 1775. The church is a small building, with an octagonal turret, and exhibits a good specimen of the original country churches for small parishes. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship.

Arncliffe (St. Oswald)

ARNCLIFFE (St. Oswald), a parish, partly in the union of Skipton, and E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, but chiefly in the union of Settle, and W. division of that wapentake, W. riding of York, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Kettlewell; comprising the townships of Buckden, Hawkeswick, and Litton, and the chapelry of Halton-Gill; and containing 834 inhabitants, of whom 182 are in the township of Arncliffe. This parish consists by estimation of 35,860 acres, nearly all in grass, including 5800 in Arncliffe township; and is bounded on the west by Pennygent, a mountain 2270 feet high, and on the north by Camm Fell, 2245 feet high. The district consists of two valleys, separated by an almost impassable mountain: one of these, called Langstrothdale, is watered by the Wharfe, which has its rise here; and the other, called Littondale, by the Skirfare, which forms a junction with the Wharfe at the bottom of the valley. The air is for the greater part of the year piercing, owing to the vicinity of the high hills just mentioned, which being often capped with snow, render the winds cold and sharp. There is a cottonmill in the village, but grazing forms the chief occupation of the inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £50, with an excellent glebe-house; patrons and appropriators, the Master and Fellows of University College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £483. 7. The church, with the exception of the tower, was taken down and rebuilt in 1805: the chancel has just been again rebuilt by subscription, and in the same style as the tower; and several windows of that character have been inserted in the body of the edifice. At Halton-Gill and Hubberholme are chapels, the livings of which are in the patronage of the Vicar of Arncliffe.

Arncliffe, Ingleby (St. Andrew)

ARNCLIFFE, INGLEBY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 7 miles (S. W. by W.) from Stokesley; containing 329 inhabitants. There appears, from Domesday book, to have been anciently two manors in the parish, Ingleby and Arncliffe, which after the Conquest were held by King William, when they were styled Engelebi and Erneclive; the estates were subsequently granted to Robert de Brus, as parcel of the barony of Skelton, to be held of the king in capite; and among the families which have at different periods owned property here, occur those of Bruce, Fauconberge, Ingelram, Colville, and Mauleverer. The parish is in the district called Cleveland, and comprises 1850 acres, of which about 1200 are arable, 300 woodland and plantations, and the remainder meadow and pasture. The lands are chiefly the property of William Mauleverer, Esq., the descendant of the Norman baron who came over with the Conqueror from Normandy, and whose family have continued here since that period. The surface is undulated, and the high grounds command fine views of the vale of Cleveland, the distant hills of Richmond, and the sea; the hills are richly wooded, and the scenery in many parts is beautifully picturesque; the soil is a strong clay. Freestone of good quality is plentiful; but as there is little demand, it is not wrought to any great extent. The village of Ingleby, the only one in the parish, is neatly built, and occupies a retired situation on the summit of a gentle ridge, at a short distance from the road between Stokesley and Thirsk. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Bryan Abbs, Esq., the impropriator, with a net income of £49: the tithes have been commuted for £125. The church is a neat plain structure with a campanile turret, erected in 1822, at an expense of £500, raised by subscription.

Arncott

ARNCOTT, a chapelry, in the parish of Ambrosden, union of Bicester, hundred of Bullington, though locally in the hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 2½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Bicester; containing 331 inhabitants.



<--Previous:
Appleford - Ardwick
Next:-->
Arne - Arundel