Barkwith - Barnacre

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

145-148

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'Barkwith - Barnacre', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 145-148. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50778+ Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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Barkwith, East (St. Mary)

BARKWITH, EAST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, E. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (N. E.) from Wragby; containing 255 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Lincoln to Louth; the soil is fertile, and abounds with a fine chalk marl, which is used as manure. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 10. 10.; net income, £195; patron, G. F. Heneage, Esq., who is lord of the manor. The church is in the later style of English architecture, with an embattled tower, and has a font of very ancient date, highly ornamented; in a niche over the porch is a figure of the Virgin and Child. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Barkwith, West (All Saints)

BARKWITH, WEST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, E. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2½ miles (N. E.) from Wragby; containing 130 inhabitants. It contains by computation 700 acres; and is situated on the road between Lincoln and Louth, the church standing at the thirteenth milestone from each of those towns. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 5.; net income, £160, derived from 114 acres of land in lieu of tithes; patron, C. D. Holland, Esq. There is a glebe-house in good repair, with a handsome garden. The church is a plain building with an old tower.

Barlaston (St. John the Baptist)

BARLASTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Stone, S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, N. division of the county of Stafford, 4¼ miles (N. by W.) from Stone; containing 591 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2087a. 2r. 23p. of inclosed land, with about 60 acres of waste: the Grand Trunk canal passes through. The village, which is well built, is delightfully situated near the summit of a lofty acclivity on the east side of the vale of the Trent, commanding extensive and beautiful views: Parkfield is a hamlet of pleasant houses on a terrace above the Trent. Barlaston Hall, a handsome mansion, stands near the north end of the village. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patron, the Duke of Sutherland. The church is a modern building of brick, with an ancient stone tower; it was enlarged in 1830, when a new gallery was erected. There is a school for 28 children, to which Thomas Mills, in 1800, bequeathed £12 per annum; it is also endowed with a cottage and garden.

Barlavington

BARLAVINGTON, a parish, in the union of Sutton (under Gilbert's act), hundred of Rotherbridge, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 4½ miles (S.) from Petworth; containing 132 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 13. 4.; patrons, the family of Biddulph. The tithes have been commuted for £100, and there are 8 acres of glebe.

Barlborough (St. James)

BARLBOROUGH (St. James), a parish, in the union of Worksop, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 8 miles (N. E. by E.) from Chesterfield; containing 804 inhabitants. It comprises by estimation 3305 acres, of which 2000 are arable, and 1150 pasture and meadow land; and is intersected by the roads from Chesterfield to Worksop, and from Rotherham to Mansfield, which cross here at right angles. There are some collieries in operation, and two quarries of limestone. Barlborough Hall is a spacious and interesting edifice of the Elizabethan style. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 1. 5½., and in the patronage of the Rev. C. H. R. Rodes; the tithes have been commuted for £600, and there are 73 acres of glebe. The church is a handsome structure, with a square tower. In 1752, Margaret and Mary Pole founded an almshouse for six poor persons, and endowed it with an estate now producing £75 per annum.

Barlby

BARLBY, a chapelry, in the parish of Hemingbrough, union of Selby, wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, E. riding of York, 1½ mile (N. E. by E.) from Selby; containing 387 inhabitants. This township, which has a long village, comprises 1411a. 3r. 15p.; about 900 acres are rich arable land, and the remainder pasture and common. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £65; patron, the Vicar of Hemingbrough: the great tithes produce £369 per annum. The chapel is a neat brick edifice with an octagonal turret, built about 1777.

Barleston

BARLESTON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3 miles (N. E.) from Market-Bosworth; containing 580 inhabitants, a portion of whom are employed in the weaving of stockings. The chapel is dedicated to St. Giles.

Barley (St. Margaret)

BARLEY (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Royston, hundred of Edwinstree, county of Hertford, 2¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Barkway; containing 792 inhabitants. It contains by computation 2500 acres, and the road from Barkway to Cambridge runs through the village. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Ely: the tithes have been commuted for £581, and the glebe consists of 32 acres. A school is endowed with £10 per annum.

Barley, with Whitley-Booths

BARLEY, with Whitley-Booths, a township, in the parish of Whalley, union of Burnley, Higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Colne; containing 686 inhabitants. These are two adjoining villages at the foot of Pendle hill; WhitleyBooths is north of Barley, and distant from it about half a mile. The area of the township is 1564 acres. In this part the general patois of the county becomes almost peculiar, being more rugged. An annual wake is held on Midsummer-day.

Barleythorpe

BARLEYTHORPE, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and soke of Oakham, county of Rutland, 1 mile (N. W. by W.) from Oakham; containing 200 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Peter.

Barling (All Saints)

BARLING (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Rochford, S. division of Essex, 4½ miles (E. S. E.) from Rochford; containing 326 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1258a. 3r. 10p., and is skirted by a creek which flows into the river Thames from Rochford: it comprises the manors of Barling and Mucking, the former of which is the property of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London, by gift from Edward the Confessor. Here are several good oyster-beds. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The great tithes have been commuted for £342, and the vicarial for £171; the glebe comprises about 27 acres. The church is an ancient edifice, consisting of a nave, north aisle, and chancel, with a tower surmounted by a spire.

Barlings (St. Edward)

BARLINGS (St. Edward), a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 6½ miles (E. N. E.) from Lincoln; containing, with the township of Langworth, 352 inhabitants. An abbey for Præmonstratensian canons, dedicated to St. Mary, was founded in 1154, the revenue of which at the Dissolution was £307. 16. 6.: the last prior was Dr. Mackerel, who, having put himself at the head of an insurrection against the king's authority, was taken and executed in 1536. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £55; patrons, T. T. Drake and C. Turnor, Esqs. The church is in ruins. A school is endowed with a rent-charge of £10.

Barlow

BARLOW, a chapelry, in the parish of Staveley, union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 3¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Chesterfield; containing 627 inhabitants. The surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque: the district abounds with coal, but there are no mines in operation; there are quarries of good stone for building. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £95; patron, the Rector of Staveley. The tithes were commuted, with certain exceptions, for land in 1817. The chapel is a plain neat structure, containing 300 sittings, of which one-third are free.

Barlow

BARLOW, a chapelry, in the parish of Brayton, union of Selby, Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 3¼ miles (S. E.) from Selby; containing 284 inhabitants. It is on the south bank of the Ouse, and comprises by computation 2150 acres; the railway from Selby to Hull passes at a short distance on the north. The living is a donative; net income, £30; patron, G. H. Thompson, Esq.; impropriator, the Hon. E. R. Petre. The tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1800. The church is a small edifice.

Barlow, Little

BARLOW, LITTLE, a hamlet, in the parish of Dronfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Chesterfield; containing 59 inhabitants. The tithes, with certain exceptions, were commuted for land in 1817.

Barmby-on-the-Marsh

BARMBY-on-the-Marsh, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, E. riding of York, 3½ miles (W.) from Howden; containing 506 inhabitants. This place, called in Domesday book Barnebi, was, according to tradition, parted by William the Conqueror among forty of his soldiers; and in conveyances of property it is described as being in forty parts, or oxgangs, bearing the names of the original owners. The township comprises 1459 acres, of which 49 are common or waste. The village is pleasantly situated at the confluence of the Ouse and Derwent, and contains two sail-cloth and coarse linen manufactories. Races are held on the last Thursday in June. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £30; patron, the Vicar of Howden. The chapel, dedicated to St. Helen, was the tithe-barn of the prebendary of Barmby till the dissolution of monasteries. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. In the reign of James I. Richard Galthorpe gave to trustees certain lands, now producing £100 per annum, to be applied to the use of the poor, the reading minister, and the repairs of the chapel, staiths, jetties, &c.; and John Blanchard endowed a lectureship, the appointment to which is vested in the inhabitants. Here are two mineral springs called St. Peter's and St. Helen's wells, one chalybeate, the other sulphureous.

Barmby-on-the-Moor (St. Catherine)

BARMBY-on-the-Moor (St. Catherine), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 1¾ mile (W.) from Pocklington; containing 475 inhabitants. It comprises 2471a. 1r. 26p., of which about two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture, and moorland abounding with game; the surface is for the most part level, with a soil generally sandy. The village, which is of considerable length, stands on the Hull and York road, and was anciently a market-town, and of much greater importance than at present, having received a grant of various immunities, such as freedom from toll, &c., which the inhabitants still enjoy, subject to the payment of a small sum annually to the Dean and Chapter of York. The ancient manor-house is surrounded by a moat. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8.; net income, £50; patron, the Dean of York. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, in 1777. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style, with later additions: the original square tower has been surmounted with a neat and well-proportioned spire of later English character, and a handsome window inserted. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists.

Barmer

BARMER, a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 8 miles (W. N. W.) from Fakenham; containing 61 inhabitants. It comprises 1294a. 3r. 31p., nearly all arable; there are 100 acres of plantation. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £5; patron and impropriator, Thomas Kerslake, Esq. The church, which had been long in ruins, was converted by the father of the present patron into a mausoleum.

Barming (St. Margaret)

BARMING (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union and hundred of Maidstone, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 2½ miles (W. by S.) from Maidstone; containing 540 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 745a. 3r. 4p., is intersected by the road from Maidstone to Tonbridge, and by the river Medway, which is crossed by a stone bridge leading to East Farleigh, and by another of wood, called St. Helen's bridge, on the road to West Farleigh. The soil is rich, and peculiarly adapted to the cultivation of hops and fruit, of which latter a large quantity is sent to the London market. There are 66 acres of common, The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 1., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £400, subject to increase or decrease according to the increase or decrease of hops and fruit; and there are 70 acres of glebe. Here was a Roman villa, the foundations of which were taken up a few years ago, when coins of the Lower Empire, and of Edward I. and later English monarchs, were found. The abbess of St. Helen's, London, had a summer retreat here; but there are no remains of the house. The poet Smart resided upon his paternal estate in the parish; and the Rev. John Harris, D.D., author of a History of Kent, a Dictionary of Arts and Sciences, &c., formerly held the living.

Barming, West

BARMING, WEST, a hamlet (formerly a parish), locally in the parish of Nettlestead, union of Maidstone, hundred of Twyford, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 3 miles (S. W.) from Maidstone; containing 44 inhabitants. It comprises 323 acres of land; and the river Medway, over which is a modern bridge, flows along the southern border of the hamlet. The living, which was a rectory, has been consolidated with that of Nettlestead, and the church is in ruins. The place is now deemed extra-parochial.

Barmoor

BARMOOR, a township, in the parish of Lowick, union and E. division of Glendale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 7 miles (N. by E.) from Wooler. In 1417, the lords marchers assembled here, at the head of a force amounting to 100,000 men, against the Scots, who, on hearing of their approach, retreated within their own territory. The English army also encamped in the vicinity prior to the battle of Flodden, on the night after which the English general slept at Barmoor wood. A fair was formerly held at Cross Hills, between this place and Lowick. The tithes have been commuted for £298. 16. 3. payable to the Dean and Chapter of Durham, and £10. 11. 8. to the impropriators.

Barmpton

BARMPTON, a township, in the parish of Haughton-le-Skerne, union of Darlington, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Darlington; containing 124 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1502 acres, of which 887 are arable, and 615 grass land: the soil is a productive clay, with a small part gravel; and the scenery pleasing and picturesque. The principal farm was occupied some years since by the brothers Collings, who contributed so much to improve and bring into public notice the breed of shorthorned cattle: at their sale in 1812, Comet, one of their bulls, was disposed of for the enormous sum of 1000 guineas, and Lily, a cow, for 400 guineas. The tithes have been commuted for £255.

Barmston

BARMSTON, a township, in the parish of Washington, union of Chester-le-Street, E. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 4¾ miles (W.) from Sunderland; containing 81 inhabitants. This place was once the property of the very ancient family of Hilton, of whom Sir Robert, in 1322, granted to his chaplain all the wax and honey of his wild bees in Barmston Park; it afterwards came to the Lilburnes and the Tempests. On the banks of the river Wear is an iron-foundry, and within the limits of the township is also a mineral spring. The tithes have been commuted for £128.

Barmston (All Saints)

BARMSTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Bridlington, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Bridlington; containing 254 inhabitants. This is a remarkably fine agricultural parish, comprising by measurement 2290 acres, chiefly arable, of a loamy soil excellent for the growth of all sorts of grain: on the east is the sea, which every year washes away a small portion of the land; and the coast abounds with gravel, large quantities of which are used for repairing the roads. The village is pleasantly situated at the northern extremity of Holderness, on the road from Hull to Bridlington and Scarborough. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 11. 10½., and in the patronage of Sir H. Boynton, Bart.: the rent-charge in lieu of tithes is about £680, and there are 38 acres of glebe in the parish, and 67 in the township of Ulrome, which is partly in the parish of Skipsea. The church is in the decorated English style, and has a nave, chancel, and south aisle, with an embattled tower at the south-west angle. In the chancel is a table-monument of white alabaster, highly ornamented, and having a recumbent effigy of a knight in plate armour, supposed to represent Sir Martin de la See, who so signally assisted Edward IV. after that monarch had landed at Ravenspurn, in 1471. There is a church at Ulrome; and a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists has been erected in the parish.

Barnack (St. John the Baptist)

BARNACK (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Stamford, soke of Peterborough, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3½ miles (S. E.) from Stamford; containing, with the hamlets of Pilsgate and Southorpe, 860 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £28. 10.; net income, £1025; patron, the Bishop of Peterborough. The tithes were commuted for corn-rents, under an inclosure act, in the 39th and 40th of George III. The church is an interesting and very ancient structure, in the early Norman and English styles, with a tower, the lower part of which, from the character of the arch opening from it into the nave, is evidently of more ancient date than the earliest of the Norman details, and probably one of the very few specimens of Saxon architecture remaining in the kingdom. A school is supported by subscription, and by a donation from the funds of the poor's estate, which consists of fifty-one acres and five tenements, producing a rental of £72. An act for inclosing lands was passed in 1841.

Barnacle

BARNACLE, a hamlet, in the parish of Bulkington, union of Nuneaton, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 6 miles (N. E.) from Coventry; containing 263 inhabitants. It is mentioned in the Conqueror's survey, and is supposed to have anciently belonged to the family of Fitzwith. In the time of Elizabeth the manor was granted to Michael Fielding, from whom it descended to Basil Fielding, Earl of Denbigh.

Barnacre

BARNACRE, with Bonds, a township, in the parish and union of Garstang, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2¼ miles (N. E.) from Garstang; containing 628 inhabitants. The township comprises 4478a. 2r. 2p., in about equal portions of arable and pasture, and nearly all the property of the Duke of Hamilton: the surface is undulated, and the soil various, and rich towards the Wyre, which river divides the township from Garstang. The Lancaster and Preston railway passes through for about two miles. Excellent stone is obtained from a quarry here; and there are two cotton-mills. Woodacre Hall was a residence of a former Duchess of Hamilton. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £148. 1. 9., payable to W. Standish, Esq. At Bonds are the relics of Greenhalgh Castle, which was held for the king by the Earl of Derby, in 1643, during the parliamentary war, and subsequently destroyed by Cromwell: it was erected by Thomas Stanley, Earl of Derby, in the reign of Henry VII., for the protection of his newly acquired estates; and is mentioned by Camden, as being situated near "the swift stream of the Wyr."