Braithwell - Brampton-Abbots

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

339-343

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'Braithwell - Brampton-Abbots', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 339-343. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50822 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Braithwell (St. James)

BRAITHWELL (St. James), a parish, partly in the union of Doncaster, and partly in that of Rotherham, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York; containing, with the chapelry of Bramley, 800 inhabitants, of whom 447 are in the township of Braithwell, 6½ miles (E. by N.) from Rotherham. In acknowledgment of a subscription raised here towards the ransom of Richard I., when made captive in Germany, a charter for a market and fair was granted to this place on his return from the Holy Land: the former is disused, but the latter is held on the first Wednesday in May; and a cross still remains in the centre of the village, with an inscription in Norman French, dated 1191, commemorating the event. The parish comprises 2930 acres, of which 69 are waste, and the soil is partly limestone and partly clay; in the township are 1368 acres of arable land, 502 meadow, and 7 wood. The country is high, and slightly inclines to the south-east: a great part of the township is uninclosed, and cultivated in very long slips of ground belonging to various proprietors, which gives the surface a bleak appearance in that neighbourhood; but in other portions there is a considerable quantity of wood. The inhabitants manufacture stockings of excellent quality; red-ochre is made, and lime burnt. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 7. 6., and in the patronage of the Crown: all the tithes of Bramley belong to the vicar, and the impropriator of the rest of the parish is the Earl of Scarborough; the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £351, and those of the earl for £368. The church is an ancient edifice, with a square tower; an arch, of very early style, separates the chancel from the nave. At Bramley is a chapel of ease; also a place of worship for Wesleyans. Of the several powerful springs in the parish, the chief are the Town well and Holy well.

Brakes

BRAKES, a township, in the parish of Leintwardine, union of Ludlow, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford; containing 156 inhabitants.

Bramber (St. Nicholas)

BRAMBER (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union and hundred of Steyning, rape of Bramber, W. division of Sussex, 1 mile (E. S. E.) from Steyning, and 50 miles (S. by W.) from London; containing 138 inhabitants. This place was noted for a castle built by the descendants of William de Braiose, upon whom the lands had been bestowed by the Conqueror. In the reign of Edward III., the castle was garrisoned by John de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, for the protection of the town and shore from the expected attack of the French, who were hovering off the coast. It was also garrisoned by the parliamentarian forces during the civil war. The village is situated on the river Adur, which is navigable for small vessels; and, though once of considerable extent and importance, consists at present only of a few cottages. It was a borough by prescription, and returned members to parliament in the 23rd of Edward I.: after that time it frequently omitted, and was occasionally represented in conjunction with Steyning, till the 7th of Edward IV., from which period it regularly continued to return two representatives, until its disfranchisement in the 2nd of William IV. The parish comprises by computation 850 acres, of which 280 are arable, 425 down, and 145 other pasture. The living is a discharged rectory endowed with only one-third of the tithes, with the vicarage of Buttolphs united, and valued in the king's books at £10. 6. 8.; it is in the patronage of the President and Fellows of Magdalene College, Oxford, who are impropriators of the remaining two-thirds of the tithes of Bramber, and of all the rectorial tithes of Buttolphs. The tithes of Bramber have been commuted; the impropriate for £113. 6.; and the incumbent's for £56. 13. The church, formerly cruciform, is a small ancient edifice, now consisting only of a nave and chancel, but containing some fine portions in the Norman style, with a low square tower. The ancient and once formidable castle, occupied a quadrilateral area, 560 feet in length, and 280 in breadth, surrounded by a wide and deep moat; the remains consist principally of part of a square Norman tower, of great solidity, some detached portions of the walls to the north-west, and the mount whereon stood the keep. On altering a road near the river, an old bridge of excellent workmanship was discovered, upon which had stood a chapel; at Beddington was an hospital dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene, the founder of which is unknown.

Bramcote

BRAMCOTE, a parish, in the union of Shardlow, S. division of the wapentake of Broxtow, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 5 miles (W. by S.) from Nottingham; containing 732 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1000 acres of rich sandy land; it occupies several lofty hills, and the scenery, interspersed with some large and handsome mansions, is highly picturesque. From the village, which is situated on a considerable eminence, and is one of the prettiest in the county, is a fine view of the town of Nottingham, and of the country for many miles round. Coal is obtained, and excellent bricks are made to a great extent; a number of persons are also employed in the lace and stocking manufacture. The Nottingham canal passes through the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Attenborough: on the inclosure of land in 1771, 4½ acres were allotted to the vicar; and a parsonage was built here in 1843, at a cost of £1500. The church stands on an abrupt eminence. A square rock here is a natural curiosity.

Bramcott

BRAMCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of Bulkington, union of Nuneaton, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (S. E.) from Nuneaton; containing 73 inhabitants.

Bramdean (St. Simon and St. Jude)

BRAMDEAN (St. Simon and St. Jude), a parish, in the union of Alresford, hundred of Bishop's Sutton, Droxford and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Alresford; containing 225 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1204 acres, whereof 159 are common or waste. It is pleasantly situated, and in the village, which is irregularly built and of rural appearance, are several handsome detached residences: the surrounding scenery is picturesque; and the view of the vale of Bramdean, from the church, which is on the brow of a hill, is very beautiful. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 14. 9½., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £224, and there are 10½ acres of glebe. The church has recently been repaired and decorated in an appropriate style, and, from its beautiful situation, partly embowered among trees, forms an interesting feature. Near the manor-house of Woodcote is a tessellated pavement in tolerable preservation.

Bramerton (St. Peter)

BRAMERTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 4¼ miles (S. E. by E.) from Norwich; containing 229 inhabitants. It comprises 728a. 3r. 34p., whereof 106 acres are common or waste; and is bounded on the north by the navigable river Yare, from which rises an extensive and beautiful common, in the hills of which are found a great variety of fossils. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6, and in the patronage of Robert Fellowes, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and there are 22 acres of glebe, and a handsome and commodious parsonagehouse. The church is chiefly in the decorated style, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a square embattled tower: the interior was repewed, and thoroughly repaired, in 1839.

Bramfield, Herts.—See Braintfield.

BRAMFIELD, HERTS.—See Braintfield.

Bramfield (St. Andrew)

BRAMFIELD (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 8 miles (N.) from Saxmundham; containing 746 inhabitants. It comprises 2546a. 3r. 25p., of which the soil is chiefly clay, and the surface level. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 6., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £172; impropriator, Robert Howard, Esq.: there are 4 acres of glebe, with a small parsonage-house. The church is chiefly in the decorated style, and consists of a nave and chancel, separated by an exquisitely carved screen; the tower is circular and detached, and seems to have belonged to a more ancient church. In the chancel is a splendid monument to Arthur Coke and his lady; the former represented kneeling, and his lady in a recumbent posture, with an infant in her arms: there are also numerous memorials to the Rabett family, who have resided at Bramfield Hall for more than four centuries. On Castle Hill is a mound or encampment, moated; not far from which, a few years since, several bronze halberd-spear heads were found.

Bramford (St. Mary)

BRAMFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Bosmere and Claydon, E. division of Suffolk, 2¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Ipswich; containing 881 inhabitants. The Stow-Market and Ipswich canal crosses the parish; and there is a station of the Ipswich and Bury railway. The lands are watered by the river Orwell. The living is a vicarage, with the living of Burstall united, valued in the king's books at £13. 3. 9.; net income, £79; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury.

Bramhall

BRAMHALL, a township, in the parish and union of Stockport, hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 3 miles (S. by W.) from Stockport; containing 1396 inhabitants. The township comprises 2481 acres; the soil is chiefly clay. The manorial mansion is a curious edifice of timber and brick plastered over; it stands on elevated ground, and possesses great interest, as part of the wooden building is supposed to date as far back as the reign of John. At the south-east angle is the domestic chapel, apparently of the time of Richard III., having a flat panelled roof, and a considerable quantity of painted glass in the windows, and containing the remains of several deceased members of the family of Davenport, the branch of which residing at this seat became extinct in 1829.

Bramham (All Saints)

BRAMHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the Upper division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York; comprising the townships of Bramham-withOglethorpe and Clifford, with the modern village of Boston; and containing 2760 inhabitants, of whom 1194 are in the township of Bramham-with-Oglethorpe, 4¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Wetherby. A battle was fought here in 1408, between Sir Thomas Rokeby, sheriff of Yorkshire, and the Earl of Northumberland, in which the earl was defeated and slain, and by which the possession of the county was secured to Henry IV. The extensive village of Bramham is pleasantly situated in the vale of a small rivulet, on the great north road; the neighbourhood is undulated, and abounds with rich and beautiful scenery. There are good stone-quarries for building and other purposes. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 6.; net income, £159; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church is an ancient and elegant structure, in the decorated English style. There are chapels, forming separate incumbencies, at Boston and Clifford; and places of worship in the parish for Wesleyans and Ranters. Visible remains of the Watling-street exist on Bramham Moor, a mile north of the village: from the middle of this moor is an extensive prospect of a well-cultivated district, which abounds with freestone, limestone, and coal.

Bramhope

BRAMHOPE, a chapelry, in the parish of Otley, Upper division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Otley; containing 350 inhabitants. This chapelry, which is situated on high ground overlooking the valley of Wharfdale, comprises 1290 acres of fertile land. The village is irregularly built, and the surrounding scenery is varied. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of six Trustees, appointed by the founder, and has a net income of £50: land was assigned in lieu of tithes, in 1805.

Bramley (All Saints)

BRAMLEY (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Basingstoke, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4½ miles (N. by E.) from Basingstoke; containing 428 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 3. 6½.; patrons and impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of Queen's College, Oxford. The great tithes have been commuted for £510, and the vicarial for £150; there are about 21½ acres of glebe belonging to the impropriators, and nearly five to the vicar.

Bramley

BRAMLEY, a parish, in the union of Hambledon, First division of the hundred of Blackheath, W. division of Surrey, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Guildford; containing 970 inhabitants. This parish, which is described in the Norman survey under the name of Bronlegh, comprises about 4420 acres, and, in the southern part, abounds with natural beauties, particularly where it adjoins Hascomb and Dunsfold: the Arun and Wey Junction canal crosses it. In its ecclesiastical concerns it is annexed to the parish of Shalford: the great tithes have been commuted for £126, and the vicarial for £160. The church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, is built in the form of a cross, with a small chapel on the south side, and is of the character of the 15th century; it contains several neat monuments.

Bramley

BRAMLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Peter, liberty of the borough of Leeds, W. riding of York, 4 miles (W. N. W.) from Leeds; containing 8875 inhabitants. It is on the Leeds and Halifax road, and comprises by computation 2387 acres. The substratum abounds with slate of good quality, and with freestone of great firmness of texture, in high repute for building, and of which large quantities are sent to most of the principal towns in the kingdom, by the Leeds and Liverpool canal, which passes through the township, and connects the two great ports of Liverpool and Hull. The village is pleasantly situated near the new Stanningley road, on a boldly undulated and richly wooded eminence, overlooking Airedale; it is nearly a mile in length, built chiefly of stone, and, viewed in connexion with the scenery of the vale beneath, has a very imposing aspect. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the manufacture of woollen-cloth, for which there are not less than twenty large mills in full operation in the village and adjacent hamlets, Stanningley, Rodley, Newlay, and White Cote; many are also engaged in the freestone quarries of Bramley Fall, on the south side of the river Aire. The chapel, supposed to have been originally founded by the monks of Kirkstall Abbey, has undergone so many alterations, that little of its ancient character remains; it was enlarged in 1833, when a spire was added to it, at an expense of £700, raised by subscription. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Leeds, with a net income of £289. A church, dedicated to St. Thomas, has been erected at Stanningley, which see. The great tithes of the chapelry have been commuted for £100, and the small for £15. There are places of worship for Baptists, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Bramley

BRAMLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Braithwell, union of Rotherham, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 4¼ miles (E.) from Rotherham; containing 353 inhabitants. This place belonged to the abbey of Roche, the abbot of which had a grange here, that became, after the Dissolution, a seat of the Spencers. The family of Eyre lived in a house called the Hall, in the village, for several generations. The township comprises about 977 acres of land. The chapel is a small ancient fabric. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Brampford-Speke (St. Peter)

BRAMPFORD-SPEKE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of St. Thomas, hundred of Wonford, Wonford and S. divisions of Devon, 4½ miles (N. by E.) from Exeter; containing 393 inhabitants. The parish is pleasantly situated on the river Exe, by which it is bounded on the east; the scenery is richly varied, and derives great beauty and interest from the proximity of the river. The number of acres is about 1500; the soil is rich and fertile. A fair, chiefly for pleasure, is held at Michaelmas. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £216; impropriators, the family of May: the glebe comprises 39 acres of moderately good land. The church is an ancient cruciform structure, with a handsome embattled tower.

Brampton (St. Martin)

BRAMPTON (St. Martin), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland; containing, with the townships of Easby and Naworth, 3304 inhabitants, of whom 2754 are in the town, 9½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Carlisle, and 305 (N. by W.) from London. According to Camden, this was the site of the Roman station Bremetenracum, which some modern writers, with more probability, have fixed at Old Penrith. The town sustained extensive damage during the wars of Edward II.; of which, as well as of its earlier importance, it still exhibits evident marks. In Nov. 1715, a large force under the command of Mr. Forster, who had received a general's commission from James Stuart, entered the town, where they proclaimed the Pretender; and hence marched to Penrith. During the rebellion of 1745, the young Pretender led his troops hither, to observe the motions of Gen. Wade, who was mistakenly reported to be marching from Newcastle to the relief of Carlisle; and after remaining here several days, he proceeded to Carlisle, which had surrendered to his arms.

The town is situated between the small rivers Irthing and Gelt, tributaries to the Eden, about one mile south of the former, and two and a half from the point where they unite; and lies about two miles south of the Picts' wall. It occupies a deep narrow vale embosomed in hills, and consists principally of two streets irregularly built, and a spacious market-place; the houses have been mostly rebuilt, and are of handsome appearance: the inhabitants are well supplied with water. The manufacture of gingham employs nearly 700 persons: there are two breweries. The railway between Newcastle and Carlisle passes a mile and a half to the south, and is connected with the town by a good road, and also by means of the Earl of Carlisle's railway, which reaches to the extensive coal and lime works at Tindal Fell, and by which coal and lime are brought hither in abundance. The market is on Wednesday, and is well supplied with corn, admitted toll-free; fairs are held on April 20th, the second Wednesday after Whitsuntide, the second Wednesday in Sept., and the 23rd of Oct., for hornedcattle, horses, and pigs. The county magistrates hold a petty-session every alternate Wednesday; and courts leet and baron for the barony of Gilsland are held at Easter and Michaelmas, in the town-hall, a neat octagonal edifice with a cupola, erected by the Earl of Carlisle in 1817, on the site of the former hall, in the market-place, the lower part being formed into a piazza, under which butter, eggs, poultry, &c., are sold on the market-day.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £466; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Carlisle: in 1777, land was assigned in lieu of tithes. The present church was built in 1788, out of the chapel and tenements of an almshouse, and with the materials of the old church, the chancel of which is still remaining on the southern bank of the river Irthing, about a mile west of the town, being used for the performance of the funeral service for those who are interred in the cemetery. The church was greatly enlarged in 1827 at an expense of £1800: on which occasion the Rev. Mr. Ramshay presented five bells and an organ. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists, and Presbyterians. The poor law union comprises 14 parishes or places, and contains a population, according to the last census, of 10,525.

Two miles east of Brampton, and about a mile south of the Irthing, commanding a fine view of the vale of St. Mary, through which that river flows, is Naworth Castle, the ancient baronial seat of the lords of Gilsland, the earliest notice of which occurs in the 18th of Richard II. The walls, including two large square towers in the front, besides others at the angles, inclose a quadrangular area, each side of which measures 40 paces: the hall, 70 or 80 feet in length, and of proportionate width and height, displays all the magnificence of feudal grandeur; and the chapel, to which there is a descent of several steps, is decorated with a profusion of armour. The dungeons of the castle, which were the prison for the barony, are in their original state; they consist of three cells underground, and one above, and the strong iron rings to which the prisoners were chained are yet remaining. A great portion of this splendid castle was burnt down on the 18th of May, 1844; but it has been restored, as far as practicable, by Viscount Morpeth, eldest son of the Earl of Carlisle. To the north-east of Brampton is a high conical hill called the Mote, about 300 feet above the level of the streets, and from the summit of which, now planted with trees, a most extensive view of the surrounding country is obtained: at some distance from the base are vestiges of an intrenchment, and a breastwork of considerable strength. It is supposed to have been originally a Danish encampment, or probably a place of security for the removal of property in case of invasion, as, from the steepness of the acclivity, a small number of men on the summit might overpower an assailing multitude. It was used as a seat of justice for the barony of Gilsland, and at present forms a link in the chain of telegraphic communication between the northern parts of England and the southern parts of Scotland. To the south of the town is a fine quarry of freestone, where the Romans obtained part of the materials for building the great wall, vestiges of which are still visible. Walton House occupies the site of a station on the wall; and on the rocky banks of the Gelt are some inscriptions of the time of Agricola, one of whose legions was stationed near Brampton.

Brampton (St. Peter)

BRAMPTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 3 miles (W. by N.) from Chesterfield; containing, with Cutthorpe township, 3937 inhabitants. This parish, which was formerly part of that of Chesterfield, is situated on the road from Chesterfield to Bakewell, and comprises 7956 acres, of which 1080 are common or waste, and 250 woodland; the soil is mostly a strong clay, and the higher grounds are peaty. Coal and ironstone are found in abundance, and clay of good quality for pottery-ware is also plentiful. There are very extensive works for brown earthenware, employing several hundreds of persons; a manufactory for tobacco-pipes on a large scale; and an iron-foundry comparatively small. Many of the inhabitants are occupied in a mill for the making of candlewicks, near the boundary of the parish; in a small spinning-mill; and some bobbin-mills. The mines of coal and ironstone are in active operation; there are quarries of stone for building and the repair of roads, and slate of a very durable nature is wrought.

The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield: the great tithes have been commuted for £410, and those of the incumbent for £90; there are 13½ acres of glebe belonging to the appropriator, and 12 to the curate. The church, which was rebuilt at a remote period, and repaired within the last twenty years, is in the Norman style, but much disfigured by modern alterations; it contains some ancient monuments to the family of Clarke. A district church dedicated to St. Thomas was consecrated in 1832, the expense of its erection, £3000, having been borne partly by subscription, and partly by the Parliamentary Commissioners: it stands on the Chatsworth road, about a mile west of the town of Chesterfield, and is in the style of architecture prevailing in the fourteenth century, presenting a pleasing object in the surrounding landscape. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop; net income, £150. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. In the eastern moor were, until lately, vestiges of a burying-place called CorLowe, considered to be of greater antiquity than the period of the Roman occupation of Britain. In various parts of the high grounds of the parish are found oysters, muscles, and other shell-fish, in a fossil state; and the cactus and other tropical plants are also met with imbedded in the stone. The living was for some time held by Dr. Edmund Cartwright, inventor of the powerloom and carding-machine.

Brampton (St. Mary)

BRAMPTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Leightonstone, union and county of Huntingdon, 1¾ mile (W. by S.) from Huntingdon; containing 1164 inhabitants. This parish, which is seated on the navigable river Ouse, and on the road from London to Cambridge, comprises 3110 acres; about three-fourth parts are arable, and the soil is generally sandy but fertile. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 4.; net income, £160; patron, the Prebendary of Brampton in the Cathedral of Lincoln. The great tithes have been commuted for £93. 10. The church is partly in the decorated and partly in the later English style, with a fine south porch enriched with elegant tracery; it was rebuilt in 1635, and repewed in 1835. Samuel Pepys, secretary to the admiralty in the reigns of Charles II. and James II., and elected president of the Royal Society in 1684, was born here.

Brampton

BRAMPTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Torksey, union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7½ miles (S. S. E.) from Gainsborough; containing 130 inhabitants.

Brampton (St. Peter)

BRAMPTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of South Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 2¾ miles (S. E.) from Aylsham; containing 263 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 441 acres, and is bounded on the east by the navigable river Bure: the soil is various, the arable land being principally loam; and the surface is somewhat uneven. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5, and in the patronage of R. Marsham, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £148. 19. 4., and there are about 14 acres of glebe. The church is chiefly in the early English style, and consists of a nave, chancel, and south aisle, with a tower circular at the base and octangular above. From several urns containing calcined bones, this is conjectured to have been the place of interment connected with the Roman station at Burgh, on the opposite side of the river.

Brampton (St. Mary)

BRAMPTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 4 miles (E. by. N.) from Harborough, on the road to Rockingham; containing 104 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 2387 acres; there are good quarries of stone for building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 6. 8.; net income, £346; patron, Earl Spencer: there are 132 acres of glebe, with a residence. The church is a fine specimen of the early English style, with a lofty spire, and contains some sepulchral brasses rather mutilated, and an ancient mural monument with two figures kneeling in the costume of the time, belonging to the Norwich family, formerly lords of the manor. A house in the parish, once an inn known as the "Hermitage," appears to have been a religious house, surrounded by a moat. Richard Cumberland, afterwards Bishop of Peterborough, was some time rector.

Brampton (St. Peter)

BRAMPTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (N. W.) from Wangford; containing 322 inhabitants. It comprises 2002a. 1r. 5p., and is situated on the road from Halesworth to Beccles. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the patronage of the Rev. G. O. Leman: the tithes have been commuted for £433. 5. 6., and there is a commodious rectory-house, with a glebe of about 12 acres. The church consists of a nave and chancel with an embattled tower. A Sunday school is endowed with £9. 6. per annum; and the rents of an estate are applied to the repairs of the church, the relief of the poor, and other purposes.

Brampton

BRAMPTON, a township, in the parish of Long Martin, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 2½ miles (N.) from Appleby; containing 304 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £165, and there is a glebe of nearly 40 acres.

Brampton-Abbots (St. Michael)

BRAMPTON-ABBOTS (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Ross, hundred of Greytree, county of Hereford, 1 mile (N.) from Ross; containing 197 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises by computation 1500 acres, is situated on the left bank of the river Wye, and in the heart of a rich and fertile district, abounding with picturesque and romantic scenery; it is intersected in the eastern part by the road from Ledbury to Ross. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Hereford: the tithes have been commuted for £321. 2. 6., and the glebe comprises 8 acres.