Brightside-Bierlow - Brinkhill

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

375-379

Citation Show another format:

'Brightside-Bierlow - Brinkhill', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 375-379. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50830 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Brightside-Bierlow

BRIGHTSIDE-BIERLOW, a township, in the parish and union of Sheffield, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. E.) from Sheffield; containing 10,089 inhabitants. This populous and very extensive township, parts of which form suburbs to the borough of Sheffield, partakes in the manufactures of the surrounding district. Several large steel-works, foundries, and ironforges have been established; and the manufacture of table-knives and cutlery of various kinds, and of scythes and agricultural implements, is carried on to a great extent: there are also quarries of excellent buildingstone. The village of Brightside is situated on the river Don, and in the immediate vicinity are several pleasing villas, and some richly varied scenery; Wincobank hill is about 300 feet above the river, and commands a prospect unusually fine and extensive. Here is a station on the Sheffield and Rotherham railway; and a new road to Barnsley has been constructed, leading through the romantic dell of Burngreave to Pitsmoor, and avoiding the precipitous hill of Pye Bank. Three ecclesiastical districts, called Brightside, Pitsmoor, and Wicker, respectively, were constituted in August, 1845, under the act 6th and 7th of Victoria, cap. 37: each living is in the gift of the Crown and the Archbishop of York alternately. The district of Brightside extends from the east-northeast suburbs of Sheffield, in the direction of Rotherham, its middle and greatest breadth being about a mile; Wicker is an immediate suburb of Sheffield, and more to the north lies Pitsmoor. There are several places of worship for dissenters. At Wincobank are remains of Roman fortifications and embankments.

Bright-Waltham.—See Waltham, Bright.

BRIGHT-WALTHAM.—See Waltham, Bright.

Brightwell (St. Agatha)

BRIGHTWELL (St. Agatha), a parish, in the union and parliamentary borough of Wallingford, hundred of Moreton, county of Berks, 2½ miles (W. N. W.) from Wallingford; containing 611 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1958a. 1r. 15p., and is bounded on the north by the river Thames, and on the south by the Tadsey: the soil is a rich loam, partly mixed with gravel; the surface is high on the northern boundary, but in other parts level. The castle here was given up by Stephen to Henry II., then Duke of Normandy, after the treaty of peace concluded between him and Matilda at Wallingford, and was probably soon afterwards demolished, for its site is not even known, though conjectured to have been within the moat where the manor farmhouse now stands. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £44. 17. 11., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £855, and there are 51 acres of glebe. The church contains a monument to the memory of Thomas Godwyn, D.D., author of a treatise on Jewish and Roman antiquities, and who died rector in 1642. There is a meeting-house for dissenters.

Brightwell (St. John the Baptist)

BRIGHTWELL (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Woodbridge, hundred of Carlford, E. division of Suffolk, 5½ miles (E. by S.) from Ipswich; containing 81 inhabitants, and comprising about 800 acres. The Hall, a fine old building belonging to the Barnardiston family, was pulled down about 1730. The living is a rectory, with the perpetual curacy of Foxhall annexed; net income, £54; patron, Sir J. K. Shaw, Bart.

Brightwell-Baldwin (St. Bartholomew)

BRIGHTWELL-BALDWIN (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Henley, hundred of Ewelme, county of Oxford, 5 miles (S. W. by S.) from Tetsworth; containing, with the tything of Cadwell, 312 inhabitants. This parish, which takes its name from its crystal springs, comprises 1569a. 4p.; about 356 acres are pasture, and 40 woodland. The old mansion of the Stone family was burnt down in 1786, and the present was erected in 1790. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 16.; net income, £494; patron, W. F. L. Stone, Esq. Under an inclosure act in 1802, land and corn-rents were assigned in lieu of tithes. The church is a picturesque edifice in the decorated English style, with a tower, the front of which is elaborately enriched with canopied niches; in the chancel are some fine brasses, and on the floor some ancient tiles with figures. To the north of the church is the sepulchral chapel of the families of Carleton, Stone, and Lowe, whose mansions are in the parish. At Bushy-Leas, between this place and Chagrove, a curious glass vessel, surrounded by twelve Roman sepulchral urns, has been dug up. Herbert Westphaling, afterwards Bishop of Hereford, and Dr. William Paul, Bishop of Oxford, held the living.

Brigmerston

BRIGMERSTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Milston, union and hundred of Amesbury, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of Wilts; containing 33 inhabitants.

Brignall (St. Mary)

BRIGNALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Teesdale, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 1 mile (S. W. by W.) from Greta-Bridge; containing 190 inhabitants. This place for many years formed one of the numerous manors possessed by the Scrope family, and some remains of an old Hall adjoining the village were removed in the present century. From the Scropes the property came into the hands of Lord Barrymore, and from him descended to the Edens, of Windleston, in the county of Durham; it was purchased by the late John Bacon Sawrey Morritt, Esq., of Rokeby Park, from Sir R. J. Eden, Bart., for £66,000, and thus became an appendage to the beautiful demesne of Rokeby. The parish is bounded on the south and east by the picturesque river Greta, and comprises by computation 2000 acres, of which nearly three-fourth parts are pasture, one-fourth arable, and 100 acres woodland; the surface is undulated, the soil generally a loamy clay. There are some quarries of fine grey slate. The living is a vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £8. 2. 6.; it is in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £271, and there are about 63 acres of glebe. The church was rebuilt in 1834. The remains of a large Roman camp which commanded the ford on the river, are visible at Greta-Bridge; it was surrounded by a triple fosse, and relics of antiquity and Roman coins have frequently been dug up in its precincts.

Brigsley (St. Helen)

BRIGSLEY (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Caistor, wapentake of Bradley-Haverstoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (S. by W.) from Great Grimsby; containing 125 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement upwards of 800 acres, half arable, and half meadow. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 4. 4., and in the patronage of the Chapter of the Collegiate Church of Southwell; net income, £55.

Brigstock (St. Andrew)

BRIGSTOCK (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Thrapston, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 22 miles (N. E.) from Northampton; containing 1262 inhabitants. It embraces 6013a. 3r. 21p., a large portion of which is occupied by parks and plantations; the village is of some extent, and situated about the middle of the parish. The lands formerly belonged to the dukes of Montague, whose ancient manor-house is still remaining. James I. granted a weekly market to be held on Thursday, and fairs on the festivals of St. Mark the Evangelist, St. Bartholomew the Apostle, and St. Martin: the market has long since fallen into disuse, but the fairs are still held. By a custom that prevails in the manor, if any man die seized of copyhold lands or tenements which descended to him in fee, his youngest son inherits; but if they were purchased by him, they fall to the eldest son. The living is a vicarage, with the living of Stanion annexed, valued in the king's books at £11. 17. 3¾.; net income, £236; patron, the Duke of Cleveland. The church has some Norman remains, amidst various alterations of later date; the tower is of very rude workmanship, and plastered.

Brill (All Saints)

BRILL (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Thame, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 7 miles (N. W. by N.) from Thame; containing 1449 inhabitants. Here was a palace belonging to the kings of Mercia, which was subsequently a favourite residence of Edward the Confessor, who frequently came hither during the hunting season, to enjoy the pleasures of the chase in Bernwood Forest. After the Conquest, Henry II., attended by his chancellor Thomas à Becket, kept his court here, in 1160 and 1162; and Henry III., in 1224: King John also appears to have resorted to the place, as there are some remains of a building called after him. In 1642, a garrison stationed here for the king was attacked by a detachment of the parliamentary forces under the patriotic Hampden, but the latter were repulsed with considerable loss. The parish comprises 3100 acres of fertile land, of which 2395 are meadow and pasture, 310 arable, and 240 wood. Lace-making is carried on; and there is a small manufactory for earthenware. Brill and Ashendon Hills abound with interesting geological features, and numerous specimens of fossil remains; and the former also with excellent yellow ochre, of which considerable quantities have been conveyed to distant parts. There are likewise some quarries of stone used for roads, and for burning into lime; building-stone is occasionally found, and there is an excellent quarry of iron sandstone. From its elevated situation, the place commands a most extensive and richly varied prospect, comprehending a panoramic view of nine counties; and the salubrity of the air, and the nearness of Dorton spa, have made it the frequent resort of invalids, for whose accommodation several well-built lodging-houses have been erected. A fair granted to Sir John Molins, in 1346, has been revived within the last few years, and is held on the Wednesday next after Old Michaelmas-day.

The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Boarstall annexed; net income, £101; patron and impropriator, Sir T. D. Aubrey, Bart. The church is a small edifice of considerable antiquity, partly in the Norman style, with a low tower and spire; the entrance is through a rude porch in the south wall, over which is the date 1654, probably the period when the church was repaired after the parliamentary war. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Independents. A national school was established in 1815, and united with a school founded by Samuel Turner, Esq.; it is endowed with £60 per annum, arising from £2000 three per cent. consols., bequeathed by Sir John Aubrey in 1825. On the disafforestment of Bernwood Forest, under a commission appointed in the 21st of James I., an allotment was set apart for the benefit of the poor, consisting of a farmhouse and buildings, with 181 acres of land, let at a clear rent of £120. On the north side of Muswell Hill, partly in this parish and partly in that of Piddington, stood the hermitage of St. Werburgh, a cell to the priory of Chetwood.

Brilley (St. Mary)

BRILLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Kington, hundred of Huntingdon, county of Hereford, 6¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Hay; containing 587 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the border of Wales, which bounds it on the north and west; and is partly encircled on the south by the river Wye. It consists of 3771 acres, and exhibits much rural and interesting scenery, the surface being in a great degree diversified by bold hills and deep dales, remarkably well wooded, and watered by numerous streams. The road from Kington to Hay crosses from north to south. The living is united to the vicarage of Kington, and the Bishop of Hereford is appropriator.

Brimfield

BRIMFIELD, a parish, in the union of Tenbury, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Ludlow; containing 591 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the borders of Shropshire, and comprises 1807 acres, of which nearly 700 are arable, and the rest pasture, with the exception of 76 acres of common or waste and about 50 acres of hop-ground; the surface is moderately undulated, with a large portion of wood, and the soil above the average fertility. The roads from Ludlow to Tenbury and to Leominster branch off at the village, which is of some extent; the parish is intersected by the Leominster canal, and bounded by the river Teame. The proposed Hereford and Shrewsbury railway is intended to pass through the confines of Brimfield. The living is a perpetual curacy; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Hereford: the great tithes have been commuted for £155, and those of the incumbent for £125; two acres of glebe appertain to the bishop. The nave and chancel of the church were rebuilt, in a plain style, in 1834; but the tower is of some antiquity.

Brimington (St. Michael)

BRIMINGTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 2 miles (N. E.) from Chesterfield; containing 780 inhabitants. This place was severely afflicted by the plague in 1603. The manor of Brimington, formerly an appendage of Newbold, was successively in the families of Breton, Loudham, and Foljambe, the last of whom sold it about 1800: the family of Brimington was extinct in the time of Edward III. The parish, which was separated from that of Chesterfield in 1844, comprises 1252a. 25p., and is situated on the road from Chesterfield to Worksop, on the Chesterfield canal, and near the Midland railway. Stone is quarried for building purposes. An act was passed in 1841, for inclosing the waste lands. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £102; patron, the Vicar of Chesterfield: there are 9 acres of glebe, with a house. The church was rebuilt by subscription, in 1847. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans; and a national school, built in 1840, is supported by subscription.

Brimpsfield (St. Michael)

BRIMPSFIELD (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of Rapsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 8 miles (E. N. E.) from Cirencester; containing 417 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2612 acres, of which nearly equal portions are arable and pasture, with 250 acres of wood; the soil varies considerably, but is generally a light loam. A part of the land lies high, being on the Cotswold hills, but it is interspersed with some fertile and well-wooded valleys, possessing much beauty: the river Stroudwater has its source within the parish. Good building-stone is found. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Cranham consolidated, valued in the king's books at £9. 12. 1., and in the patronage of William Goodrich, Esq.: the tithes of Brimpsfield have been commuted for £303, and of Cranham for £162; the glebe contains 32 acres. The church is a small ancient structure. The Roman Ermin-street passes along the northern side of the parish. An alien priory of Benedictine monks, subordinate to the abbey of St. Stephen, at Fountenay, in Normandy, anciently existed here; also a castle, destroyed by Edward II. on his march from Cirencester to Worcester.

Brimpton (St. Peter)

BRIMPTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Newbury, hundred of Faircross, county of Berks, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Newbury; containing 412 inhabitants. It comprises 1689a. 2r., of which about 80 acres are common and roads. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7, and in the patronage of the Rev. G. B. Caffin: the tithes have been commuted for £320, and the glebe comprises 15 acres. At the period of the Norman survey there were two churches in the parish; and the remains of an ancient ecclesiastical edifice are visible at a farmhouse, about half a mile from the present church. The Knights Hospitallers appear to have had an establishment here, in the time of Henry III.

Brimpton (St. Andrew)

BRIMPTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Stone, W. division of Somerset, 2¾ miles (W. S. W.) from Yeovil; containing, with the hamlets of Alvington and Houndstone, 123 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 7., and in the patronage of the family of Williams: the tithes have been commuted for £130, and there are about 30 acres of glebe.

Brimscomb-Port

BRIMSCOMB-PORT, an ecclesiastical parish, in the parish of Minchin-Hampton, union of Stroud, hundred of Bisley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Stroud; comprising the hamlets of Chalford, Hyde, Burley, Brimscomb, and Cowcombe. This place obtained its name from a basin of the Thames and Severn canal within the hamlet, a large sheet of water, on the margin of which are the spacious wharfs and warehouses of the canal company. In the village, which is chiefly inhabited by persons employed in the clothing-trade, are two extensive mills for the manufacture of superfine broad-cloths and kerseymeres, affording employment to 500 persons. Here is a station of the railway from Swindon to Gloucester; it is 2¼ miles from the Stroud station. The living is a rectory, in the gift of D. Ricardo, Esq. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Brimslade.—See Savernake-Forest.

BRIMSLADE.—See Savernake-Forest.

Brimstage

BRIMSTAGE, a township, in the parish of Bromborrow, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester, 3¾ miles (N. by E.) from Great Neston; containing 161 inhabitants. The manor was held by the family of Domville, as early as the reign of Edward I., and passed by a succession of female heirs to the families of Hulse, Troutbeck, and Talbot. The township comprises 1012 acres, of which 42 are waste: the soil is clay. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £103.

Brind, with Newsholme or Newsham

BRIND, with Newsholme or Newsham, a township, in the parish of Wressel, union of Howden, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 2¾ miles (N. by W.) from Howden; containing 231 inhabitants. The Hull and Selby railway passes by the place.

Brindle (St. James)

BRINDLE (St. James), a parish, in the union of Chorley, hundred of Leyland, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 4¾ miles (N. by E.) from Chorley; containing 1401 inhabitants. This place appears to have been granted, by the superior tenant of the crown, soon after the Conquest, to a family who were designated from their possessions. The manor passed by the marriage of the heiress of "Sir Peter de Bryn, of Brynhill," to the Gerards, with whom it continued till the reign of Henry VIII., when Sir William Cavendish is found patron of the living, though the manor did not come into the possession of the Cavendish family until the middle of last century. The parish is elevated land, and comprises 2900 acres, of which the soil is clay and sand; about one-third is arable, and the rest pasture, garden-ground, and waste: the river Lostock passes at the south-western extremity, where it receives a nameless brook, whose slender stream flows near the village. There are two valuable stone-quarries in the parish; one at Duxon Hill, producing large millstones, which are frequently exported to Ireland; and the other at Denham Hill, where good ashlar is obtained in abundance. Chemical works, established in 1830, by Mr. Thomas Coupe, employ 30 hands; and here are also some print-works. The Blackburn and Preston railway runs through, and the Leeds and Liverpool canal skirts, the parish.

The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 8. 4., and in the patronage of the Duke of Devonshire: the tithes have been commuted for £500; and there are more than 11 acres of glebe, with a glebe-house and other buildings. The church is in the early English style, with a square tower; the body of the edifice was rebuilt in 1817: in the churchyard is a stone coffin, and in the parsonage, an ancient font. The Roman Catholic chapel here, is dedicated to St. Joseph, and is the property of the Benedictines; it was built in 1786, and is a neat structure, situated in a vale. A free school, supposed to have been founded by Peter Burscough, has funds consisting of about £335, lent on interest, producing £16. 16. per annum; and near the Roman Catholic chapel is a school which was erected by Mr. Joseph Knight, of Chelsea, a native of the parish, with a house for the master and mistress, who receive £25 per annum.

Brindley

BRINDLEY, a township, in the parish of Acton, union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 4¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Nantwich; containing 184 inhabitants. It comprises 1071 acres, of which the soil is clay and a strong loam. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £66. 5., and the vicarial for £26. 11.

Brindleys

BRINDLEYS, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Howden, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from Howden; containing 8 inhabitants. It comprises about 173 acres of farm land.

Bringhurst (St. Nicholas)

BRINGHURST (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Uppingham, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester; containing, with the township of Drayton and the chapelry of Great Easton, 840 inhabitants, of whom 92 are in the township of Bringhurst, 2¼ miles (W. by N.) from Rockingham. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 15.; net income, £241; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Peterborough. Land and a money payment were assigned in 1804, in lieu of tithes for the townships of Bringhurst and Drayton. There is a chapel of ease at Great Easton.

Brington (All Saints)

BRINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Thrapston, hundred of Leightonstone, county of Huntingdon, 5¼ miles (N. by W.) from Kimbolton; containing 129 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated within half a mile of the road from Huntingdon to Northampton, comprises by measurement 1014 acres. The living is a rectory, with the livings of Bythorn and Old Weston united, valued in the king's books at £34. 3. 6½.; net income, £492; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Clare Hall, Cambridge. Land and a money payment were assigned in lieu of tithes, in 1804.

Brington (St. Mary)

BRINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Brixworth, hundred of Newbottle-Grove, S. division of the county of Northampton, 7 miles (N. W.) by W.) from Northampton; containing, with the hamlets of Little Brington and Newbottle, 795 inhabitants. This place was the occasional resort of Charles I., who, during his detension at Holdenby, about two miles distant, came frequently to Althorp House, in the parish. Althorp, which was formerly more populous, now contains only the noble mansion of Earl Spencer, to whom it gives the title of Viscount. The house is a splendid pile of building, occupying three sides of a quadrangle, and contains numerous spacious apartments, decorated with a number of very valuable paintings; it has also a magnificent library. The park is beautifully undulating, and abounds in fine forest-timber. The parish formerly included part of the hamlet of Clasthorpe; but from the neglect of walking the boundaries, that portion, containing about 300 acres, was claimed by the parish of Flore, in which the remainder was situated. Brington now comprises by computation 3800 acres; it is near the London and North-Western railway and the Grand Junction canal.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £40, and in the gift of Earl Spencer: on the inclosure, about a century since, 380 acres of land, now valued at about £500 per annum, were allotted in lieu of tithes, and some further tithes have been commuted for a rentcharge of £62. 10.; there are about 9½ acres of old glebe. The church is in the early, decorated, and later English styles; the chapel contains some fine monuments to the memory of deceased members of the Spencer family, and in 1846 the present Earl added a bay, in memory of his father, mother, and eldest brother the late Earl: the windows of this bay are of the best modern painted glass. There is a place of worship for dissenters. A school is maintained by Earl Spencer; and a Sunday school is supported by an allowance of £12 per annum from certain charity estates, which were settled in the reign of Henry VI., and produce £225 per annum. There are a chalybeate and a petrifying spring. Henry Chicheley, Archbishop of Canterbury, and founder of All Souls' College, Oxford, and of the college of Higham-Ferrers, in this county, was for ten years rector of the parish.

Briningham (St. Maurice)

BRININGHAM (St. Maurice), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Holt, W. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (S. W.) from Holt; containing 243 inhabitants. It comprises 1201a. 2r. 31p., of which 970 acres are arable, 130 pasture and meadow, and 60 woodland. The surface is a good deal undulated; and on a high eminence is Belle Vue, a lofty tower, octangular at the base and circular at the top, from which is an extensive view of the surrounding country and the ocean. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rev. S. Brereton, who is impropriator, and whose tithes have been commuted for £353. The church, chiefly in the decorated style, consists of a nave and chancel, with a square tower on the south; it was thoroughly repaired in 1840.

Brinkburn, High Ward

BRINKBURN, HIGH WARD, a township, in the parochial chapelry of Long Framlington, union of Rothbury, E. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 9¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Morpeth; containing 96 inhabitants, and comprising 1894 acres. Brinkburn, including also the Low Ward, was anciently extra-parochial: it stretches about three miles along the north side of the river Coquet, and is crossed by the high road-from Weedon Bridge: the soil is a strong clay. Here are extensive strata of limestone, and a mine of coal. A priory for Augustine canons was founded in the time of Henry I., by Osbertus Colatarius, in honour of St. Peter: the establishment, at the time of the Dissolution, consisted of ten religious, and the revenue was rated at £77. It was beautifully situated within a curvature of the Coquet, which flows close to the walls; and now forms an interesting ruin, exhibiting specimens of Norman architecture. On the hill above the priory are traces of a Roman town, in connexion with a military way; and the foundations of the piers of a Roman bridge are discernible when the water is low.

Brinkburn, Low Ward

BRINKBURN, LOW WARD, a township, in the parochial chapelry of Long Framlington, union of Rothbury, E. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland; containing 57 inhabitants, and comprising 579 acres.

Brinkburn, South Side

BRINKBURN, SOUTH SIDE, a township, in the parish of Felton, union of Rothbury, W. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 9 miles (N. N. W.) from Morpeth; containing 55 inhabitants.

Brinkhill (St. Philip)

BRINKHILL (St. Philip), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, hundred of Hill, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 6½ miles (N. N. W.) from Spilsby; containing 168 inhabitants. It comprises about 1000 acres, of which the soil is a red marl, and the surface hilly. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £137; patron, R. Cracroft, Esq.: land was assigned in lieu of tithes, in 1773. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In a stratum of blue clay in the village, are found veins of barren marcasite.