Broughton - Brownedge

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

409-412

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'Broughton - Brownedge', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 409-412. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50837 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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Broughton, parish of Bierton, Buckingham.—See Bierton.

BROUGHTON, parish of Bierton, Buckingham. —See Bierton.

Broughton (St. Lawrence)

BROUGHTON (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Newport-Pagnell; containing 168 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 9. 7.; net income, £116; patron, James Praed, Esq., lord of the manor, and proprietor of the parish: the glebe comprises 14 acres.

Broughton (All Saints)

BROUGHTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of St. Ives, hundred of Hurstingstone, county of Huntingdon, 6 miles (N. E. by N.) from Huntingdon; containing 363 inhabitants. This place was the barony by virtue of which the abbot of Ramsey Abbey sat in parliament; and had, in consequence, four knights' fees annexed to it. The parish is situated about a mile from the road from Huntingdon to Ramsey, and comprises by computation 2300 acres; about 250 acres are pasture, and the rest arable, resting upon a strong clayey soil. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 13. 9.; net income, £283; patrons, the family of Johnston: the tithes have been commuted for land, comprising 370 acres. The church is an elegant structure, in the decorated English style, with later additions; it was an appendage of the abbey of Ramsey.

Broughton

BROUGHTON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Preston, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of the county of Lancaster; comprising the townships of Broughton, Barton, and Haighton; and containing 1320 inhabitants, of whom 695 are in the township of Broughton, 3¼ miles (N. by W.) from Preston, on the road to Lancaster. This place is supposed to have received its name from a small Roman fort. In the reign of John, Theobald Walter claimed against Ralph, son of Utred, and Robert his brother, the whole town of "Brocton;" and in the 19th of Edward II., Gilbert de Singleton held a messuage here, probably Broughton Tower, a strong heavy structure of stone, which was taken down about 40 years ago: this property passed to the Rawstornes, by whom it was sold to the Rothwell family, of Hoole. The township contains 2341 acres, the soil of which is in general a retentive clay; the surface is elevated, and there are fine views of the surrounding country, and the river Ribble. Here is a station of the Preston and Lancaster railway. Broughton Hall, an old dwelling, formerly belonged to the Atherton family: Bank House is the property of J. W. R. Wilson, Esq.; and Uplands, the seat of Lieut.-General Sir Thomas Whitehead. Mr. Thornborrow, also, has a residence here.

The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £106, including a house; patrons, the Trustees of Hulme's estate; impropriators, Messrs. Rothwell and Mr. Richard Seed. The rectorial tithes have been commuted for £157. 10., and the vicarial for £12. 12. The chapel is in the early English style, and has a noble square tower bearing the date 1533; the body of the edifice, the interior of which is very neat, was rebuilt in 1822 at a cost of £2000. At Fernyhalgh is a Roman Catholic chapel, erected in 1795, principally at the expense of the Rev. Anthony Lund, V.G., who also built a house for the priest, and endowed the chapel with five acres of land. A school in the chapelry, which was rebuilt in 1845, has an endowment of £120 per annum; and adjacent to the Roman Catholic chapel is a school built by the Rev. Richard Gillow. There are some small charities.

Broughton-cum-Kersal

BROUGHTON-cum-Kersal, a township, and ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Manchester, union and hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (N. N. W.) from Manchester, on the new road to Bury; containing 3794 inhabitants. This is a wealthy suburb of Manchester, abounding in villas, good streets, and elegant ranges of houses, chiefly the residences of the merchants of that town, and nearly all built within the last fifteen years. The surface of the township is undulated, the soil gravel, sand, and clay, and the scenery picturesque: the river Irwell passes through. The Manchester races take place here. Kersal Hall and Kersal Cell are old mansions, the latter belonging to Miss Atherton. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rev. John Clowes, of Broughton Hall, and others; net income, £400, with a house. The great tithes have been commuted for £100. The church, dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, and in the debased perpendicular style, was completed in 1839, at an expense of about £7000: a chancel, in the decorated style, with painted windows by Hardman of Birmingham, was added by the present incumbent in 1846. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A day school near the church was built in 1845.

Broughton, or Barrow-Town (St. Mary)

BROUGHTON, or Barrow-Town (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, E. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (N. W.) from Glandford-Brigg; containing, with the township of Castlethorpe, 913 inhabitants. This place derives its name from a large barrow or tumulus near the western extremity of the village. It is situated on the Roman road from Lincoln to the Humber at Winteringham, and was a Roman station, which, in the time of the emperors Honorius and Arcadius, was occupied by the prefect of the Dalmatian horse, auxiliary to the 6th Legion, and which Horsley supposes to have been the station called Prœtorium. Numerous relics of the Romans have at various times been found. The manor for several ages belonged to the family of Radford, till, in 1455, Sir Henry Radford engaging in the rebellion of the Earl of Rutland and others against Henry VI., it became forfeited upon his attainder of high treason: subsequently it came into the possession of the Andersons, of which family was Sir Edmund Anderson, chief justice in the reign of Elizabeth, who presided at the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots, in Fotheringay Castle. The parish is situated on the river Ancholme, which falls into the Humber at Brigg; it is bounded on the south-east by the road to Barton, and comprises 6912 acres, of which 1200 are wood, and 863 common land. A fair is held at Midsummer. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21; net income, £824; patron, Ellys Anderson Stephens, Esq.: the glebe comprises 80 acres. The church, which was extensively repaired in 1826, is an ancient edifice, with a tower surmounted at one angle by a circular turret; it contains some interesting monuments. Gokewell, a Cistercian nunnery, founded by William de Alta Ripa prior to 1185, stood in the north-west part of the parish; the only remains are a doorway in a farmhouse which has been erected on the site.

Broughton (St. Andrew)

BROUGHTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Kettering, hundred of Orlingbury, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2¾ miles (S. W.) from Kettering; containing 593 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road from Kettering to Northampton, comprises 1675a. 1r. 20p. There are some quarries of stone applicable to rough building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 9. 7., and in the patronage of the Duke of Buccleuch: the tithes were commuted at the inclosure of the parish, for 320 acres of land, valued at about £440 per annum. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. On the inclosure 61 acres, now producing £95 per annum, were allotted in exchange for land bequeathed by Edward Hunt, in 1674, for poor widows and other aged persons of Broughton, Kettering, and Rothwell.

Broughton (St. Mary)

BROUGHTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Banbury, hundred of Bloxham, county of Oxford, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Banbury; containing, with the hamlet of North Newington, 629 inhabitants. The parish is pleasantly situated on the road from Banbury to Shipston-upon-Stour. Broughton Castle was erected by the De Broughton family about the reign of Edward I.: many interesting portions of the original building remain, but the greater part of the present mansion was erected by the Fenys or Fiennes family, about the reign of James I. The castle was a place of sufficient strength to oppose some resistance to the royalist troops after the battle of Edge-Hill. The whole of the buildings have a venerable and interesting appearance, and are surrounded by a deep moat, 80 feet broad, over which is a bridge forming the only entrance, through a square embattled gateway tower. The interior contains several magnificent apartments, adorned with paintings, and displaying some beautiful specimens of ancient architecture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 16. 0½.; net income, £539; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Charles F. Wyatt. The church, situated near the bridge leading to the castle, is an interesting structure, chiefly of the thirteenth century, but partly in the decorated and partly in the later style of English architecture, and contains some splendid monuments.

Broughton (St. Mary)

BROUGHTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wem, liberties of the borough of Shrewsbury, N. division of Salop, 3½ miles (S. by W.) from Wem; containing 188 inhabitants. It comprises about 800 acres, of which 500 are arable, and the rest pasture: roadstone is quarried. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £67; patron and impropriator, Lord Hill: the glebe comprises about 30 acres.

Broughton

BROUGHTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Stoke, union of Taunton, hundred of Taunton and TauntonDean, W. division of Somerset; containing 26 inhabitants.

Broughton (St. Mary)

BROUGHTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Stockbridge, hundred of Thorngate, Romsey and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Stockbridge; containing, with the chapelry of Pittleworth and tything of French-Moor, 1009 inhabitants. This place is by Camden identified with the Roman station Brige, which Salmon refers to a hill near the village, and of which Mr. Gale, in 1719, discovered some vestiges in an adjoining wood on the road to Salisbury. The parish comprises by measurement 4200 acres; the soil of the greater part is chalky, and of the remainder a kind of reddish marl resting on chalk. The higher grounds command rich and extensive prospects; and the lower lands are watered by a small rivulet which has its source at Over Wallop, about four miles distant. A fair for pedlery and toys is held on the first Monday in July; and a court leet annually by the lord of the manor. The living is a rectory, with the living of Bossington annexed, valued in the king's books at £37. 10., and in the gift of H. Lee, Esq.: the tithes of Broughton have been commuted for £770, and the glebe comprises 34 acres; the tithes of Bossington have been commuted for £140. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. Thomas Dowse in 1601 conveyed an estate, producing, with subsequent benefactions, £68. 17., for the support of a school.

Broughton

BROUGHTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Eccleshall, union of Stone, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 5¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Eccleshall. This place is in the Woodland Quarter of the parish, so called from its proximity to the bishop's woods and the ancient forest of Blore. Broughton Hall is an ancient mansion, of the Elizabethan era, surrounded with plantations, clumps, and shady spreading trees, particularly sycamores. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £129; patrons, the family of Broughton. The chapel is a small neat building, with an ancient stained-glass window.

Broughton

BROUGHTON, a township, in the parish of Appleton-le-Street, union of Malton, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 2 miles (N. W.) from New Malton; containing 111 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Malton to Appleton-le-Street, and comprises by computation 800 acres of land. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Broughton-Astley (St. Mary)

BROUGHTON-ASTLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 5½ miles (N. by W.) from Lutterworth; containing, with the townships of Broughton-Astley, Prime Thorp, and Sutton-in-theElms, 728 inhabitants, of whom 306 are in the firstnamed township. The parish comprises 2100 acres, whereof 1370 are pasture, and 602 arable, exclusive of glebe. A station on the Midland railway is situated here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 10. 5.; patron, the Rev. Charles Fletcher, who is lord of the manor: the tithes have been commuted for £519. 12., and there are 130 acres of glebe, which are well wooded. Besides the parish church, is a place of worship for Baptists. A small school has an endowment by Zaccheus Duckett, who, in 1806, left £100 for that purpose.

Broughton, Brant (St. Helen)

BROUGHTON, BRANT (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Newark, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 8 miles (E.) from Newark; containing 650 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the river Brant, to the west of which, at a short distance, and in the same direction, runs the river Witham; the road from Newark to Sleaford traverses the parish on the south. It comprises by admeasurement 2877 acres, of which about 1040 are arable, and the rest pasture and meadow: stone is quarried for the repair of roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £35. 13. 4., and in the gift of Sir R. Sutton, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £691. 1., and there is a good glebe-house, with a glebe of about 5 acres. The church has a handsome spire which rises to an elevation of 50 yards. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and the Society of Friends. Bishop Warburton was rector of the parish, and is supposed, during his residence here of 20 years, to have written his Legation of Moses, and other works.

Broughton, Church (St. Michael)

BROUGHTON, CHURCH (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Burton-Upon-Trent, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 8½ miles (E.) from Uttoxeter; containing, with the hamlet of Sapperton, 652 inhabitants. It comprises by computation, 2224 acres. The manor was granted by Edward VI., in 1552, to Sir William Cavendish; the Duke of Devonshire is now lord, and principal owner. The village is of pleasing appearance. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; net income, £228; patron, John Broadhurst, Esq.: the tithes of the manor were commuted for land and a money payment in 1773. The church is a venerable edifice with an embattled tower; the north side has been rebuilt, and the whole was repaired and new-pewed in 1845: in the chancel are three stone stalls. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. A school was founded about 1745, by subscription, to which the Duke of Devonshire was the principal contributor; and the sum raised was invested in land, the rental of which is about £30 per annum.

Broughton, East

BROUGHTON, EAST, a chapelry, in the parish of Cartmel, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Cartmel; containing 458 inhabitants. The families of Marshall and Machell had long a seat here: the Thornboroughs were also a long time resident, and subsequently to 1621 held one of two manors, which afterwards descended to the Rawlinsons. The township having often been confounded with Broughton in Furness, the names of East Broughton and Broughton-in-Cartmel have been adopted. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £67; patron, the Earl of Burlington. The chapel, which was consecrated in 1745, is dedicated to St. Peter. A national school for girls was commenced in the year 1830.

Broughton-Gifford (St. Mary)

BROUGHTON-GIFFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Bradford, Westbury and N. divisions, and Trowbridge and Bradford subdivisions, of Wilts, 2 miles (W.) from Melksham; containing 741 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Melksham to Bradford, and bounded on the southeast by the Lower Avon, comprises 1677 acres, of which 39 are common or waste; the soil is good, and great quantities of gravel are dug. The population is partly employed by the manufacturers of Trowbridge, Melksham, and Staverton, in the weaving of cloth, in which about 300 persons, and many of their children, are engaged. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 3. 11½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe comprises nearly 33 acres. The church is a spacious and ancient structure, with a massive square embattled tower. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Broughton, Great

BROUGHTON, GREAT, a township, in the parish of Bridekirk, union of Cockermouth, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 4½ miles (W.) from Cockermouth; containing 562 inhabitants. The village lies on the southern slope of an eminence rising from the river Derwent. The tithes were commuted for land in 1819. Joseph Ashley built an almshouse for four women, and a schoolroom, which he endowed by will dated July 18th, 1735, the former with £8, and the latter with £20. 10., per annum.

Broughton, Great and Little

BROUGHTON, GREAT and LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Kirkby-in-Cleveland, union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 2 miles (S. E.) from Stokesley; containing 511 inhabitants. The village of Great Broughton is regularly built, upon a spacious common or green, and the houses, which run in a direction nearly north and south, are neat, and in good repair. A portion of the population is engaged in the linen manufacture. There is a meeting-house for Wesleyans. On the top of a mountain near this place, is a rude monument consisting of a large collection of stones, some of an immense size, called the Wain stones, which, it has been conjectured, were raised over the remains of a Danish warrior.

Broughton-Hacket (St. Leonard)

BROUGHTON-HACKET (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union, and Upper division of the hundred, of Pershore, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 5 miles (E.) from Worcester; containing 154 inhabitants. This parish which is nearly encircled by the river Bow, so called from the direction of its course, comprises 365 acres, whereof two-thirds are arable and the remainder pasture; the soil is rich, and the surface has a gentle declivity from the village, which is situated on an elevated ridge. The road from Alcester to Worcester crosses the parish from east to west, and the Spetchley station on the Birmingham and Gloucester railway is only a mile and a half distant. There are some stone-pits, producing specimens (in which marine shells are imbedded) susceptible of a polish that renders them in appearance not inferior to the Derbyshire marble; a valuable blueish limestone, also, which supplies the city of Worcester and places adjacent with lime for building and manure, abounds. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 0½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £73, with a house built in 1845: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1807. The church is an ancient structure partly early English, and was repewed and thoroughly repaired in 1843, at a cost of nearly £200.

Broughton-in-Airedale (All Saints)

BROUGHTON-in-Airedale (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (W. by S.) from Skipton; containing 407 inhabitants. The Saxon name of this place, implying a fortified town, bears testimony to its antiquity; vestiges of works may still be traced, and various relics, either of British or Roman origin, have been discovered. From its situation between the town of Skipton, which was garrisoned by the royalists, and that of Thornton, which was occupied by the parliamentarians, the place suffered much during the civil war. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Aire, and comprises by computation 3950 acres; there is a considerable portion of high land affording pasture. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 16. 0½.; net income, £190, with a good house; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church is an ancient structure, with a square tower. There is a chalybeate spring.

Broughton-in-Furness

BROUGHTON-in-Furness, a market-town and chapelry, in the parish of Kirby-Ireleth, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 29 miles (N.W.) from Lancaster, and 270 (N. W. by N.) from London; containing 1250 inhabitants. The town is situated on the southern declivity of a gentle eminence, and is in the form of a square; the houses are built of stone, and roofed with blue slate. In the centre of it is a spacious square area, the ground for forming which was given by John Gilpin, Esq., and in which his widow erected a handsome lofty obelisk. Previously to the introduction of machinery, the spinning of woollen-yarn prevailed to a considerable extent in private houses: the making of brush-stocks and hoops at present furnishes employment to many of the inhabitants, particularly the latter, from the number and extent of the coppices on Furness Fells. There was formerly a very extensive tract of uncultivated land called Broughton Common, nearly all of which is now inclosed. The surrounding country is very mountainous, abounding with mines of iron and copper ore, and with slate-quarries; a great quantity of slate is shipped at Dudden Sands, for conveyance coastwise. Iron, grain, malt, oak-bark, and hoops, are also sent from the same spot, in vessels averaging about 60 tons' burthen; and from a place about half a mile below Dudden Bridge, in vessels of 25 tons' burthen, for which the estuary is navigable at the flow of the tide. An act was passed in 1846 for extending the Furness railway to this place. The market is on Wednesday: fairs are held on April 27th and August 1st, for horned-cattle, and on the 6th of October, for horned-cattle and sheep; those in April and October, are likewise statute-fairs for the hiring of servants, and all are much frequented by the clothiers from Yorkshire. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £108; patron, J. Sawrey, Esq.; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of York, whose tithes were commuted for land in 1828. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene. Edward Taylor, by will dated in 1784, bequeathed £100, on condition that £60 should be raised by subscription, for the benefit of a grammar school.

Broughton, Little

BROUGHTON, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Bridekirk, union of Cockermouth, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 4½ miles (W. by N.) from Cockermouth; containing 344 inhabitants. A meeting-house was built by the Society of Friends, in 1656; and one by the Baptists, in 1672. Here is a manufactory for tobacco-pipes and coarse earthenware. Abraham Fletcher, a self-taught mathematician of no inconsiderable eminence, author of the Universal Measurer, was born here in 1714; he was the son of a tobacco-pipe maker, and in early life laboured at that occupation.

Broughton, Nether (St. Mary)

BROUGHTON, NETHER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 5¾ miles (N.W.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 412 inhabitants.. It comprises 2225 acres. The soil is a stiff but fertile clay, well adapted for pasture, to which the greater portion of the land is appropriated; the surface is generally flat, and in most parts surrounded by the hills which inclose the vale of Belvoir. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 5. 7½.; net income, £347; patrons, the Hon. P. P. Bouverie and the Rev. W. G. Sawyer. The tithes of the parish, with certain exceptions, were commuted for land in 1764. The church is an ancient structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower.

Broughton-Poggs (St. Peter)

BROUGHTON-POGGS (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Witney, hundred of Bampton, county of Oxford, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Lechlade; containing 151 inhabitants. It comprises 1092a. 2r., of which 733 acres are arable, and 317 pasture. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 7. 11., and in the gift of the Rev. Dr. Goodenough: the tithes have been commuted for £266, and there is a good glebehouse, with 33a. 1r. 13p. of land. The church is a small ancient edifice, divided into a nave and chancel; the latter, which is one of the neatest in the county, contains numerous memorials of the Goodenoughs, to whom the parish has belonged for more than three centuries.

Broughton-Sulney

BROUGHTON-SULNEY, a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, S. division of the wapentake of Bingham and of the county of Nottingham, 7 miles (N. W.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 371 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the road from Nottingham to Melton, comprises by measurement 1900 acres. The surface is boldly undulated, and the scenery pleasingly diversified: the river Smite, which rises in Old Dalby, forms the eastern boundary of the parish, separating it from Nether Broughton, in the county of Leicester. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 9. 4½.; net income, £388; patron, Sir J. Radcliffe: in the year 1762, the tithes were commuted for 243a. 22p. of land. The church is an ancient edifice in good repair. The water of a spring vulgarly called Woundheal, is noted for the cure of scorbutic eruptions.

Brownedge

BROWNEDGE, a hamlet, in the chapelry of Walton-le-Dale, parish, and Lower division of the hundred, of Blackburn, union of Preston, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Preston, on the road to Chorley; containing about 250 inhabitants. It comprises 40 acres, chiefly rich pasture land, the soil of which is clay; the surface is elevated, and the scenery picturesque. The Roman Catholic chapel here, was built in 1824, at a cost of £2000; it is in the early English style, with a square tower, and belongs to the order of the Benedictines: the priest, the Very Rev. Henry Brewer, has an endowment of £100, with a house and garden attached. Schools are supported by subscription.