Brownsea - Brushford

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

412-415

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'Brownsea - Brushford', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 412-415. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50838 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


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Brownsea

BROWNSEA, an island, in the parish of Studland union of Wareham and Purbeck, hundred of Rowbarrow, Wareham division of Dorset; containing 70 inhabitants.

Brownsover

BROWNSOVER, a chapelry, in the parish of Clifton, union of Rugby, Rugby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Rugby; containing 90 inhabitants. In the 13th of Edward I., John de Bosco claimed and was allowed a court leet here; and in the 11th of Edward IV., Thomas Bellers released all his lands in this manor to Richard Boughton, with whose descendants it continued for several generations. It afterwards passed with a female heir to Sir Egerton Leigh. The chapelry is situated on an eminence near the confluence of the Avon and Swift rivers, and on the road from Rugby to Lutterworth; and comprises by measurement 853 acres. The chapel is dedicated to St. Michael. The great tithes belong to Rugby grammar school, founded by Lawrence Sheriff, who was born here.

Browsholme

BROWSHOLME, a hamlet, in the township of Bowland-Forest Lower division, chapelry of Whitewell, parish of Whalley, union of Clitheroe, wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 6½ miles (N. W.) from Clitheroe; containing 150 inhabitants. This hamlet, which has lately been disforested, comprises 1720 acres, whereof about 350 are woodland: it is the property of Thomas Goulburne Parker, Esq. Browsholme Hall, the seat of the Parker family for more than three centuries, is a large mansion of red stone, with a centre, two wings, and a small façade in front, of the time of Elizabeth and of James I.: it contains many oak rooms, with oak furniture; and a good library, having a valuable collection of MSS., paintings, some coins, and armour. The Roman Watling-street passes through the hamlet.

Browston

BROWSTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Belton, hundred of Mutford and Lothingland, E. division of Suffolk; containing 64 inhabitants.

Broxa

BROXA, a township, in the parish of Hackness, union of Scarborough, liberty of Whitby-Strand, N. riding of York, 7¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Scarborough; containing 65 inhabitants. It comprises 1858 acres, of which 509 are arable, 619 pasture, 445 wood, and 285 waste or moor.

Broxbourn (St. Augustine)

BROXBOURN (St. Augustine), a parish, in the union of Ware, hundred and county of Hertford; containing, with the chapelry of Hoddesdon, part of which is in the parish of Great Amwell, 2386 inhabitants. In the time of William the Conqueror, the manor belonged to Adeling, wife of Hugh de Grentemaisnill; it afterwards came to the Knights Templars, and lastly to the prior and brethren of the hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, who occupied the more ancient part of the present mansion of Broxbournbury. James I., on his way from Scotland, was entertained at the manor-house, where he was met by many of the nobility and the officers of state. The parish is situated on the north road, and bounded on the east by the river Lea, which separates it from the county of Essex; the New River, also, flows through it. The scenery is pleasingly diversified, and the views from many parts are extensive, embracing some mansions of great interest and beauty. The sweeps of woodland in different places are strikingly picturesque; and in Broxbournbury Park are some fine specimens of oak, elm, and Spanish chesnut. The parish comprises by admeasurement 4379 acres, whereof 2582 are in the hamlet of Hoddesdon: the soil, which is fertile, lies upon a bed of gravel of very fine quality. The Lea has a wharf about 200 yards from the church: a station of the Eastern Counties railway has been built here, of red brick and quadrangular form, in the Elizabethan style; and a little beyond it, in the valley of the Lea, the line is continued for about two miles on an embankment twelve feet high. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 6. 5½.; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of London. The great tithes have been commuted for £197. 8., and the vicarial for £147. 8.; the appropriate glebe consists of 62½ acres. The church is a large handsome edifice, in the later English style, with a square tower supporting an octagonal spire, and a north and south chapel, the former rich in detail: there are an ancient font and several very fine monuments, of which those to Lady Elizabeth Say, Sir John Say, and Sir Henry Cock, are the most remarkable. A chapel was built in Hoddesdon about 1730; and the Independents and Quakers have each a place of worship. By deed in 1727, the Hon. Letitia Monson gave £1000, since laid out in Bank annuities, for endowing an almshouse for six widows.

Broxholme (All Saints)

BROXHOLME (All Saints), a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 6¾ miles (N. W.) from Lincoln; containing 145 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1304 acres of land, and is bounded on the west by the river Till. The property was purchased of Lord Monson, a few years ago, by Frederick Robinson, Esq., now lord of the manor. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 10., and in the gift of Mr. Robinson: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and there is a good glebe-house, with 68a. 33p. of glebe.

Broxted (St. Mary)

BROXTED (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Dunmow, N. division of Essex, 3 miles (S. W.) from Thaxted; containing 737 inhabitants. This place, anciently called Chawreth, is supposed to have derived its present name from a brook or rivulet which has its source here, and flows into the river Chelmer at Tiltey. The parish comprises 3098a. 3r. 1p., of which 2195 acres are arable, 503 pasture, 138 woodland, and the remainder gardens and waste. The soil is richly fertile, and the surface rises in some parts into considerable elevations, commanding fine views of the surrounding country. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7; patron and impropriator, R. de Beauvoir, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £660, and the vicarial for £200; there is a good glebe-house. The church, pleasantly situated on the brow of a hill, is an ancient edifice with a wooden turret.

Broxton

BROXTON, a township, in the parish of Malpas, union of Great Boughton, Higher division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 5 miles (N.) from Malpas; containing 464 inhabitants, and comprising 1638 acres, the soil of which is sand and clay. It has given name to a hundred, which, at the time of the Norman survey, was called Dudestan. The tithes have been commuted for £170.

Bruen-Stapleford, county of Chester.—See Stapleford, Bruen.

BRUEN-STAPLEFORD, county of Chester.—See Stapleford, Bruen.

Bruera.—See Churton-Heath.

BRUERA.—See Churton-Heath

Bruern

BRUERN, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Chipping-Norton, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford, 3¾ miles (N. by E.) from Burford; containing 46 inhabitants, and comprising 3510 acres of land. An abbey for Cistercian monks, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, was founded by Nicholas Basset, in 1147; the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, amounted to £124. 10. 10.: the site was granted in the reign of James I., to Sir Anthony Cope, whose family built a mansion here, which was accidentally destroyed by fire.

Bruisyard (St. Peter)

BRUISYARD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Plomesgate, E. division of Suffolk, 4½ miles (N. W.) from Saxmundham; containing 296 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 1126 acres: the soil is a fertile clay, the surface is undulated, and the lower grounds are watered by a small river. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £62; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Stradbroke, whose tithes have been commuted for £92. The church is an ancient structure, chiefly in the later English style, with a circular tower at the west end, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a chapel on the south side, in which is a slab, bearing the effigies, in brass, of Michael Hare and his lady. A collegiate chapel, in honour of the Annunciation, was founded at Campsey, for a warden and four Secular priests, by Maud, Countess of Ulster, in 1347, seven years after which the establishment was removed to Bruisyard: the site and possessions, in 1366, were surrendered to an abbess and nuns of the order of St. Clare, who continued here until the general suppression, when their annual revenue was estimated at £56. 2. 1. It was granted by Henry VIII. to Sir Nicholas Hare, and came by marriage to the family of Rous.

Brumstead (St. Peter)

BRUMSTEAD (St. Peter), a parish, in the Tunstead and Happing incorporation, hundred of Happing, E. division of Norfolk, 1 mile (N.) from Stalham; containing 116 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 788 acres, of which 652 are arable, 22 wood, and the remainder marsh; the soil of the arable land is fertile. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 5. 7½., and in the gift of the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes have been commuted for £240, and there is a glebe of 23 acres, with a parsonage-house erected in 1841. The church is chiefly in the decorated style, and has a lofty embattled tower. At the inclosure in the year 1805, 12 acres were allotted to the poor.

Brundall (St. Lawrence)

BRUNDALL (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blofield, E. division of Norfolk, 6½ miles (E. by S.) from Norwich; containing 52 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south by the navigable river Yare; and comprises about 559 acres, the whole arable, excepting about 133 acres of common. The Brundall estate, consisting of a mansion and 143 acres of land, was sold to Mr. Tuck, in 1845, for £12,500. The Norwich and Yarmouth railway passes through the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, consolidated with the livings of Witton and Little Plumstead, and valued in the king's books at £4. 10.: the tithes have been commuted for £145, and the glebe comprises nearly 14 acres. The church is a plain structure, chiefly in the early English style. In the 38th of Henry III., William de St. Omer received a grant of a fair to be held here.

Brundish (St. Lawrence)

BRUNDISH (St. Lawrence,) a parish, in the union and hundred of Hoxne, E. division of Suffolk, 4½ miles (N. by W.) from Framlingham; containing 525 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, united to the vicarage of Tannington: the tithes have been commuted for £572, of which £467 are payable to the Bishop of Rochester, and £105 to the incumbent, who has also 10½ acres of glebe. The church is a handsome structure, chiefly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower: under an arched canopy in the north aisle is an altar-tomb, on which is an effigy, engraved in brass, of "Sir Esmonded de Burnedish," who died in 1349. A chantry was founded in the church, in the 7th of the reign of Richard II., by John de Pyeshall, for six chaplains.

Brundon.—See Ballingdon.

BRUNDON—See Ballingdon.

Brunslow, with Edgton.—See Edgton.

BRUNSLOW, with Edgton.—See Edgton.

Brunstock

BRUNSTOCK, a township, in the parish of Crosbyupon-Eden, union of Carlisle, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland, 2¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Carlisle; containing 75 inhabitants.

Bruntingthorpe, or Brentingthorpe (St. Mary)

BRUNTINGTHORPE, or Brentingthorpe (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 5½ miles (N. E.) from Lutterworth; containing 423 inhabitants. It comprises 1148a. 3r. 19p., of which about 300 acres are arable, and the rest pasture; the soil consists of sand, gravel, and clay. The population is partly employed in the stocking-manufacture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 7. 6.; net income, £380; patron, John Bridges, Esq. Under an inclosure act, in 1776, land and a money payment were assigned in lieu of tithes. The church is an ancient edifice of pebbles; and contains an altar-piece painted by the late rector, the Rev. T. Freeman.

Brunton, East

BRUNTON, EAST, a township, in the parish of Gosforth, union and W. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 4¼ miles (N. by W.) from Newcastle-upon-Tyne; containing 268 inhabitants. East and West Brunton, Fawdon, Dinnington, Wideopen, and Weetslade, formed the manor and estate of the Haslerigge family, and were sold in 1768, by order of the court of chancery, with the exception of the coalmines of Fawdon and Brunton. The township lies on the west of the road between Newcastle and Morpeth, and comprises by computation 936 acres of land. The tithes have been commuted for £74. 1. payable to the Bishop of Carlisle, an equal sum to the Dean and Chapter, and £9. 4. to the vicar of Newcastle.

Brunton, High and Low

BRUNTON, HIGH and LOW, a township, in the parish of Embleton, union of Alnwick, S. division of Bambrough ward, N. division of Northumberland, 8¾ miles (N. by E.) from Alnwick; containing 59 inhabitants. They are situated about a mile north from Fallowden, near a stream which shortly falls into the North Sea; the number of acres is about 1000, of which above 300 are rich old pasture.

Brunton, West

BRUNTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Gosforth, union and W. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 4¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Newcastle-upon-Tyne; containing 109 inhabitants. It is situated west of the road between Newcastle and Morpeth, and comprises by computation 1140 acres. The tithes have been commuted for £74. 3. payable to the Bishop of Carlisle, a similar sum to the Dean and Chapter, and £58. 9. to the vicar of Newcastle.

Brushfield

BRUSHFIELD, a township, in the parish and union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 4¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Bakewell; containing 53 inhabitants.

Brushford

BRUSHFORD, a parish, in the union of Crediton, hundred of North Tawton, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 3 miles (E.) from Winkleigh; containing 144 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the north bank of the river Taw, and near the road from Bideford to Exeter, comprises by computation 1300 acres. A few women are occasionally employed in weaving serges by hand-loom. Adjoining the churchyard is a green of about 3 acres, on which are marks of the foundations of houses, supposed to have been the ancient village, which, according to tradition, was destroyed by fire, and of which only one house is remaining. The living is a perpetual curacy; patron and impropriator, G. Luxton, Esq. The church, a small ancient edifice in the early English style, is situated on a hill overlooking the river; the chancel is divided from the nave by a carved oak screen, and contains a good painting of Queen Anne. Abbotsham, a farmhouse in the parish, is thought to have been the occasional residence of the abbot of Hartland, to which abbey this parish was annexed.

Brushford (St. Mary Magdalene)

BRUSHFORD (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Dulverton, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 1¾ mile (S. by E.) from Dulverton; containing 340 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the river Exe, and on the road from Minehead to Exeter, comprises by computation 2067 acres: there are some good stone-quarries, and a very fine gravel for gardenwalks is found in abundance. A fair for cattle and sheep is held on the 2nd of August, at Langridge farm, in the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 1. 5½., and in the alternate patronage of the Earl of Carnarvon and the Sydenham family; the tithes have been commuted for £305, and the glebe comprises 40 acres. The church is a plain neat edifice.