Burnett - Burrington

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

440-445

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'Burnett - Burrington', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 440-445. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50845 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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Burnett (St. Michael)

BURNETT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Keynsham, E. division of Somerset, 2 miles (S. by E.) from Keynsham; comprising 607 acres by measurement. The village is situated on the river Chew. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 10. 7½., and in the gift of the Rev. J. B. Doveton: the tithes have been commuted for £85. 8., and the glebe comprises 29¼ acres. The church is a neat edifice.

Burnham (St. Peter)

BURNHAM (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Eton, hundred of Burnham, county of Buckingham, 3½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Eton; containing 2284 inhabitants, and comprising the liberties of Upper Boveney, Britwell, East Burnham, Cippenham, and Town with Wood, and the chapelry of Lower Boveney. This place, which gives name to the hundred, is of very remote antiquity. It appears to have been the residence of the kings of Mercia during the heptarchy, and also of their successors of the Norman line after the Conquest, who had a palace near Cippenham, from which is dated the charter granted to Richard, Earl of Cornwall, who, in 1165, founded an abbey here for nuns of the order of St. Augustine, the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, amounted to £91. 5. 11. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Thames, and comprises 6250 acres, of which 573 are common or waste: the substratum is chiefly clay, in some parts overlaid with beds of diluvial gravel. The village is pleasantly situated on rising ground, about two miles east of the river. Near it is a brick-field, from which were obtained the bricks for the erection of the bridge carried over the Thames, near Maidenhead, as a viaduct for the Great Western railway. There are some extensive market-gardens, and a considerable part of the female population is employed in making lace by hand. A court leet for the manor is held every third year; and a statute-fair on October 2nd. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Eton College; impropriators, Sir C. H. Palmer, Bart., and others. The great tithes of the parish, exclusively of Lower Boveney, have been commuted for £750, and the small for £635; the vicar has a glebe of 24 acres. The church is a handsome structure. There is a place of worship for Independents. The remains of the abbey are, some ruinous walls, converted into a barn; part of the abbot's dwelling-house; and the fish-pond, now attached to the vicarage garden. There are also the remains of an ancient encampment, in the woodland called Burnham Beeches. Robert Aldrich, Bishop of Carlisle in the reign of Henry VIII., was a native of the place.

Burnham (St. Mary)

BURNHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengie, S. division of Essex, 12 miles (S. E.) from Maldon; containing 1735 inhabitants. It takes its name from a small stream running near the church, and comprises 4277a. 3r. 16p. The village is situated on the northern bank of the river Crouch, near its estuary, and has a commodious quay, to which vessels of 250 tons' burthen can come up: there are vessels of 1000 tons' aggregate burthen belonging to Burnham, employing 100 seamen. The oysterbeds, both in the river and on the coast, are extremely productive; they are held under lease from Lady St. John Mildmay by a company, and in addition to the home consumption, a considerable quantity of oysters is exported to Holland and Belgium: about 300 persons are engaged in the fishery. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £22. 13. 4., with a net income of £558: it is in the patronage of Lady St. John Mildmay, to whom also the impropriation belongs. The church, built in 1525, stands about a mile from the village, on an elevated site; its altar-piece is embellished with a good painting of the Lord's Supper, and the pulpit and font are elaborately carved. Divine service is also performed in a national schoolroom, by license of the bishop; the school is endowed with about £80 per annum. There is a place of worship for Baptists. Several Roman coins, fragments of ancient masonry, and urns containing burnt ashes, have been found on a farm at the edge of the marsh. Burnham formerly conferred the inferior title of Baron on the Fitzwalter family.

Burnham

BURNHAM, a hamlet, in the parish of ThorntonCurtis, union of Glandford-Brigg, N. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 75 inhabitants.

Burnham

BURNHAM, a hamlet, in the parish of Haxey, union of Gainsborough, W. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 160 inhabitants. It is situated a mile and a half north of the village of Haxey.

Burnham (St. Andrew)

BURNHAM (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Bempstone, E. division of Somerset, 9¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Axbridge; containing, with the hamlet of Edithmead, part of that of Highbridge, and part of the tything of Aston-Morris, 1469 inhabitants. It lies on the coast of the Bristol Channel; and its pleasant watering-place, and fine sandy beach seven miles in length, have induced many respectable families to make it their residence during the summer months. The views are exceedingly good, including Bridgwater bay, and the Glamorgan, Quantock, Mendip, and Brent hills. The Bristol and Exeter railway passes through the parish. Two medicinal springs, one saline, with a chalybeate impregnation, and the other sulphureous, with a saline principle, are much esteemed, the former for its efficacy in relieving obstinate complaints of the stomach and bowels and obstructions of the liver, and the latter for its singular property of softening the skin and removing troublesome eruptions. There are spacious hot, shower, and vapour baths, elegantly fitted-up, and conducted by Mr. Johns. A good fishery is carried on, and cod and other white-fish are taken; the parish is also celebrated for its cider. On the shore are, a lighthouse 23 feet, and another 91½ feet, above the level of the sea at high-water mark, with revolving lights. On Trinity Monday and Tuesday is an annual fair. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16. 11. 10½.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Wells: the great tithes have been commuted for £190, and the vicarial for £635; the glebe comprises two acres, with an excellent parsonage-house. The church, dedicated in 1316, is a spacious edifice with a lofty tower, and has been lately enlarged by the addition of 471 sittings. It contains a fine altar-piece, of white marble, in the Grecian style, designed by Inigo Jones for the chapel of the intended palace of Charles II. at Whitehall, and afterwards placed in Westminster Abbey, by the Dean and Chapter of which it was presented to Dr. King, Bishop of Rochester, for many years incumbent of this parish, who erected it in the church at his own expense. A school is conducted on the national plan.

Burnham-Deepdale (St. Mary)

BURNHAM-DEEPDALE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Brothercross, W. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (N. W.) from BurnhamWestgate; containing 109 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1038 acres, of which 630 are arable, 55 woodland and plantations, and the remainder marsh, for draining which last an act was obtained in 1821, whereby 250 acres have been inclosed by a wall, 70 feet broad at the base, and 10 feet high, to protect it from the sea. The village, which joins the marsh, is sheltered on the south by a range of hills clothed with plantations. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £11, and in the patronage of the Trustees of the late Mr. Blyth: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and the glebe contains 27 acres, with a handsome house, erected in 1840. The church is chiefly in the early English style, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a circular tower; its north aisle was taken down in 1796. On the shore are various artificial eminences, the supposed tombs of Saxons and Danes who fell in battle in the vicinity; and at a short distance are the vestiges of a fortification, probably raised by the Saxons, after the sanguinary battle between them and the Scots and Picts, at Stamford, in Lincolnshire.

Burnham, East

BURNHAM, EAST, a liberty, in the parish and hundred of Burnham, union of Eton, county of Buckingham, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Eton; containing 312 inhabitants. The manor of East Burnham, or Allards, was the seat of the Eyre family for more than 400 years: from them it devolved to the Sayers. This place lies south of Burnham common.

Burnham-Market, or Burnham-Westgate (St. Mary)

BURNHAM-MARKET, or Burnham-Westgate (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Brothercross, W. division of Norfolk, 36½ miles (N. W.) from Norwich, and 120 (N. N. E.) from London; containing 1126 inhabitants. This parish derives its name from the small river Burn, on which it is situated, and takes the adjunct Westgate to distinguish it from adjoining parishes of the name of Burnham. It is pleasantly situated in a fertile valley, environed by a range of hills on the west and south, within 3 miles of the sea; and comprises 3047a. 2r. 1p., of which about 2533 acres are arable, 184 pasture and meadow, 169 woodland, and 68 waste. The town or village, the lower part of which is in the parishes of Burnham Sutton and Ulph, has experienced considerable improvement of late years, though its market has been discontinued, and the buildings appropriated to that purpose converted into dwellings; the houses are in general well built, and the inhabitants amply supplied with water. A small manufactory for iron and brass has been established, and hempen cloth is prepared to a limited extent. Fairs for toys are held on Easter Tuesday and Wednesday, and August 1st and 2nd. The county magistrates hold petty-sessions here on the last Saturday in the month; and courts baron are occasionally held. The living is a rectory, with a mediety of the consolidated rectory or rectories of Burnham Norton and Ulph united, valued jointly in the king's books at £20. 16. 8., and in the patronage of ChristChurch College, Cambridge. The tithes of the parish have been commuted for £361 payable to the rector, and £361 to the college; the glebe comprises 84 acres, and there is a rent-charge of £38. 5. payable to the rector of Burnham-Sutton. The church is a neat structure of stone and flint, chiefly in the early style, consisting of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a square embattled tower ornamented with sculptured figures: in the north aisle is a whole-length figure of a priest, rudely sculptured in stone. The site of another parochial church, dedicated to St. Edmund, is now occupied by a shop. All Saints' church, Burnham-Ulph, is used as a chapel to the church of Burnham-Westgate. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Burnham-Norton (St. Margaret)

BURNHAM-NORTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Brothercross, W. division of Norfolk, 1¼ mile (N.) from BurnhamWestgate; containing 166 inhabitants. It comprises 3226a. 3r. 36p., of which about 607 acres are arable, 506 pasture and meadow, and 2062 woodland, saltmarshes, common, &c. The living, consolidated with that of Burnham-Ulph, is a rectory divided into medieties, partly annexed, with the living of Burnham-Overy, to that of Burnham-Sutton, and partly annexed to the living of Westgate. The tithes of Norton have been commuted for £253, and the glebe comprises 32¼ acres. The church, which is situated about half a mile to the south of the village, near a fertile valley, contains portions of the several styles of English architecture, and has a circular tower: there are remains of a beautiful carved screen; the font is Norman. A Carmelite monastery was founded about 1241, by Sir Ralph de Hemenhale and Sir William de Calthorp, Knts.; the revenue of which, at the time of the Dissolution, was granted to William, Lord Cobham, and estimated at £2. 5. 4. The remains of the entrance gateway, which has a fine groined roof, are still to be seen. Robert Bale, the historian, was prior of this house, and, dying in the reign of Henry VII., was interred here.

Burnham-Overy (St. Clement)

BURNHAM-OVERY (St. Clement), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Brothercross, W. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (N. E.) from BurnhamWestgate; containing 613 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the coast, and comprises 2298a. 2r. 9p., of which about 986 acres are arable, 1062 pasture and marsh, 155 woodland and water, and 77 salt-marsh and common. On a creek which crosses the marshes to the ocean, and is navigable for vessels drawing 8½ feet of water, is a small port, within the jurisdiction of that of Wells, and where a considerable trade is carried on in corn, coal, and malt, as well as in oysters, of which there is an excellent bed in the offing. The village contains an old cross, and, with the church, stands on an eminence. The living is a vicarage, united,' with a mediety of the consolidated rectories of Burnham Norton and Ulph, to the living of Burnham-Sutton, and valued in the king's books at £8. The great tithes have been commuted for £244, and the vicarial for £155; the glebe comprises 18½ acres. The church is chiefly in the early English style. There was another church in the same inclosure, dedicated to St. Andrew, no remains of which now exist. Peterstone House stands on the site of an hospital and chapel, dedicated to St. Peter de Patra, and anciently belonging to a religious community.

Burnham-Sutton (St. Albert)

BURNHAM-SUTTON (St. Albert), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Brothercross, W. division of Norfolk, adjoining Burnham-Westgate. The joint parishes of Burnham Ulph and Sutton contain 355 inhabitants, and comprise 1482a. 3r. 28p., of which about 1402 acres are arable, 54 pasture and meadow, and 23 in woodland. The living of Burnham-Sutton is a rectory, to which is annexed a mediety of the rectories of Burnham Norton and Ulph, with the living of Burnham-Overy; valued jointly in the king's books, exclusively of Overy, at £17. 10.; and in the patronage of the Crown. The tithes of Ulph and Sutton have been commuted for £380; the glebe comprises 14 acres, and the incumbent of Burnham-Thorpe has four acres of glebe here. Sutton church is in ruins. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Burnham-Thorpe (St. Peter)

BURNHAM-THORPE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Docking, hundred of Brothercross, W. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (E. by S.) from BurnhamWestgate; containing 396 inhabitants. This place anciently belonged to the Calthorp family, of whom Sir William de Calthorp, in the 55th of Henry III., obtained a grant of a market to be held on Saturday, and a fair on the eve, day, and morrow of St. Peter ad Vincula, both of which have been long discontinued. The parish comprises 2328a. 1r. 23p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 10., and in the gift of the Earl of Orford: the tithes have been commuted for £697, and the glebe comprises 30 acres, with a commodious and handsome house, erected by the Rev. D. Everard. The church is chiefly in the decorated and later English styles, with a square embattled tower; in the chancel is a fine monument of brass to Sir William de Calthorp, also a monument to the Rev. Edmund Nelson, father of Lord Nelson, the renowned naval commander, who was born here, on the 29th of Sept., 1758, during the incumbency of his father.

Burniston

BURNISTON, a township, in the parish of Scalby, union of Scarborough, Pickering lythe, N. riding of York, 3¼ miles (N. W.) from Scarborough; containing 349 inhabitants. It is situated on the eastern coast, and comprises by computation 1900 acres: the village is on the road from Scarborough to Whitby. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Burnley

BURNLEY, a market-town and parochial chapelry, and the head of a union, in the parish of Whalley, Higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 25 miles (N.) from Manchester, 53 (E. N. E.) from Liverpool, and 210 (N. N. W.) from London; comprising the townships of Burnley, Habergham-Eaves, Ightenhill Park, ReedleyHollows, Briercliffe-cum-Extwistle, Worsthorn-withHurstwood, and Cliviger; and containing 23,505 inhabitants, of whom 10,699 are in the township of Burnley. This place, anciently Brunley, derives its name from the river Burn, on which it is situated, near the confluence of that stream with the river Calder; and, from the numerous coins, fragments of pottery, and urns containing ashes and burnt bones, that have been found in the neighbourhood, is supposed to have been a Roman station. Several Saxon remains have also been discovered; and at a short distance to the east of the town is a place called Saxifield, said to have been the scene of a battle in the year 597. About the same period, Paulinus is stated to have visited Burnley, on a mission for converting the natives to Christianity; and the remains of an ancient cross, erected to commemorate his preaching, still exist.

The town is pleasantly situated on a tongue of land formed by the Burn and Calder; the greater part is of recent erection, and the houses are neatly built of freestone found in the neighbourhood. The streets are paved, and lighted with gas, under an act obtained in 1819 for the improvement of the town; and the inhabitants are well supplied with water: another act for accomplishing these objects more effectually, was passed in 1846. The barracks, standing in the adjoining township of Habergham-Eaves, were erected in 1819, at an expense of £5500, of which sum £2500 were subscribed by the inhabitants. The trade was formerly confined to the manufacture of woollen-cloth and worsted goods; but that of cotton has been introduced, and large establishments for spinning, weaving, and printing cotton, have been erected. Coal, flagstone, and slate, are found in abundance within a short distance. The Leeds and Liverpool canal, which winds nearly round the town, has contributed greatly to the promotion of its trade. The East Lancashire railway now runs by the town; and there is a branch line from Burnley to the Manchester and Leeds railway at Todmorden: this branch is 8½ miles long, and belongs to the Manchester and Leeds company. The market, granted in the 22nd of Edward I. to Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln, is on Monday and Saturday, the former day being the principal; and on every alternate Monday is a market for cattle, established in January, 1819. Fairs are held on March 6th, Eastereve, May 9th and 13th, July 10th, and Oct. 11th, for horses, cloth, and pedlery. Petty-sessions for the division are held here: the powers of the county debt-court of Burnley, established in 1847, extend over part of the registration-district of Burnley.

The township comprises 1128 acres of land. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £770; patron, R. Townley Parker, Esq.; impropriator, Earl Howe. The chapel, dedicated to St. Peter, was erected soon after the Conquest, but, having been rebuilt, and enlarged at different times, combines various styles of architecture: it is a spacious structure, and contains several monuments of the Townley family, among which is one to the memory of Charles Townley, Esq., a celebrated patron of the fine arts, whose collection of marbles was purchased by the British Museum for £20,000. A church district named St. James', and another named St. Paul's Lane-Bridge, have been endowed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; patrons, the Crown and the Bishop of Chester, alternately. A church for St. James' district was commenced in August, 1846; and other churches are situated at Briercliffe, Habergham, Holme, and Worsthorn. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, Primitive Methodists, Wesleyans, and Roman Catholics, for which last the foundation stone of a new chapel was laid in April, 1846, by the Rt. Rev. Dr. Brown. The free grammar school was founded in the reign of Edward VI., and endowed, in 1578, by Sir Robert Ingham; the endowment has been considerably augmented by benefactions, and now produces about £130 per annum: the school has an interest in thirteen scholarships founded in Brasenose College, Oxford, by Dr. Nowell, Dean of St. Paul's, London, in 1572. The Rev. W. Whitaker, D. D., the learned master of St. John's College, Cambridge, received the rudiments of his education in the school. National schools have been established: an institution for the relief of poor married women in childbirth was commenced in 1819; and there is a Strangers' Friend Society. The interest of £1244. 15. three per cent. consols., given by Mrs. Elizabeth Peel in 1800, and of £450 by Mrs. Thompson, is expended in clothing. The union of Burnley comprises 26 townships and chapelries in the parish, and contains a population of 54,192.—See Habergham-Eaves, &c.

Burnop, with Hamsteels

BURNOP, with Hamsteels, a township, in the parish and union of Lanchester, W. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham; containing 154 inhabitants. Burnop, which probably derives its name from "Brunehop," the gill or hollow of the Brune or Browney, lies on that river; Hamsteels is situated across the water westward nearer Esh. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £81. 7. 10. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Burnsall (St. Wilfrid)

BURNSALL (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 9½ miles (N. N. E.) from Skipton; containing 2726 inhabitants, of whom 284 are in the township of Burnsall with Thorpe-subMontem. The parish comprises the townships of Appletree-wick, Burnsall with Thorpe-sub-Montem, Cracoe, Hartlington, and Hetton with Boardley; and the chapelries of Rilston, and Coniston with Kilnsay; the whole forming an area, by computation, of 25,950 acres, of which 2680 are in the manors of Burnsall and Thorpe. The soil, in the valley, is rich, but on the high grounds poor turbary earth, with heath; the surface is varied, and the scenery mountainous and romantic. There are three factories, two for cotton and one for wool, employing about 120 hands. The village of Burnsall is situated on the river Wharfe, over which is a bridge of three arches, built in 1827; and the village of Thorpe in a deep glen beneath the mountains of Thorpe Fell and Burnsall Fell. The parish, it is probable, anciently formed part of that of Linton, to the rector of which it still pays a modus in lieu of corn-tithes. The living is a rectory in two medieties, valued together in the king's books at £36; net income of the first, £315; patron, the Rev. J. Graham; and of the second, £276; patron, the Earl of Craven. The church is an ancient structure, partly Norman, and partly in the English style, with a square embattled tower: on each side of the entrance of the choir are a pulpit and reading-desk. The grammar school was founded on the 26th of May, 1602, by Sir William Craven, Knt., who endowed it with a rentcharge of £20, to which, on 16th of June, 1624, Elizabeth Craven added a bequest of £200. Sir William improved the church, in 1612; built four bridges, for the repair of which and the highways he left a rent-charge of £8; and was a great benefactor to the parish, of which he was a native and resident. Various beautiful pieces of quartz and other variegated fossils, and spar, are dug from Greenhow hill, which has been a rich lead-mining district.

Burntwood

BURNTWOOD, a chapelry district, in the parish of St. Michael, Lichfield, union of Lichfield, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (W. by S.) from Lichfield; containing, with the hamlets of Edgehill and Woodhouses, 744 inhabitants. It lies on the eastern side of Cannock Chase, and comprises 2456a. 1r. 20p. of inclosed land, and about 1000 acres of common on the chase; 1716 acres are arable, 655 meadow and pasture, 12 woodland, 5 in pools and ponds, and 60 in homesteads. The land is in good cultivation. About 150 hands are employed in nail-making, but the population is mostly engaged in agricultural pursuits. There are several neat and pleasant mansions, one of which is Edgehill or Edial Hall, a square brick building with a cupola and balustrades, celebrated as the house in which the eminent lexicographer, Samuel Johnson, opened an academy in 1736; not meeting, however, with sufficient encouragement, he did not long continue here. At a short distance on the south of the chapelry passes the Wyrley and Essington canal. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Vicar of St. Mary's, Lichfield; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield: the glebe consists of about six acres, valued at £9 per annum, and a house. The chapel, dedicated to Christ, and erected in 1820, is a neat edifice of brick, with a square tower, and contains 250 sittings, whereof 140 are free. A school was endowed in 1765 by Mrs. Elizabeth Ball, with £600, of which £200 were expended in erecting the school-house, and the remainder was secured on land. Among other benefactions, the annual sum of £14 is paid out of a farm, as interest of two legacies left by the same lady, for the poor of the three hamlets comprising this township, and of the hamlet of Hammerwick.

Burpham (St. Mary)

BURPHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Preston (under Gilbert's act), hundred of Poling, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 4½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Arundel; containing 280 inhabitants. It is bounded on the west by the river Arun, and comprises by measurement 2723 acres, of which 903 are common or waste; the surface is hilly, and near the church is a high embankment, supposed to be of Roman origin, commanding a fine view of Arundel Castle, and the windings of the river. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 6.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Chichester: the great tithes have been commuted for £295. 10., and the vicarial for £149. 8. The church is principally of Norman architecture; and was originally cruciform, but the south transept has been taken down. On the downs are numerous barrows, several of which have been opened, and found to contain coins, skeletons, and military weapons: at Peppering, near Arundel, were discovered in 1820, near the foot of the downs, in a bed of gravelly loam resting upon chalk, about 3 feet from the surface, and 80 above the level of the sea, the bones, a tusk, and some grinders of an elephant.

Burrals

BURRALS, a township, in the parish of ApplebySt. Lawrence, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 1¼ mile (S. by W.) from Appleby; containing 97 inhabitants. The township is supposed to have been anciently crossed by the borough walls of Appleby; and hence, by contraction, its name. It contains a great quantity of limestone.

Burrel, with Cowling

BURREL, with Cowling, a township, in the parish of Bedale, union of Leyburn, wapentake of HangEast, N. riding of York, 1¾ mile (S. W. by W.) from Bedale; containing 138 inhabitants. The township comprises 463a. 2r. 3p.: the former place has a small village, and the latter is a hamlet, in which is situated Cowling Hall.

Burringham, East

BURRINGHAM, EAST, a chapelry, in the parish of Bottesford, union of Glandford-Brigg, E. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 10¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Glandford-Brigg; containing 624 inhabitants. It comprises 1540 acres, of which 518 are common or waste. The village, which is large, is on the river Trent, where is a ferry connecting the road between Glandford-Brigg and Doncaster. There is a place of worship for a congregation of Wesleyans.

Burrington (Holy Trinity)

BURRINGTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of South Molton, hundred of North Tawton, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 4 miles (N. W. by W.) from Chumleigh; containing 1244 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Taw, by which it is bounded on the north and east, and the road from Exeter to Barnstaple passes near the river, through a richly-wooded district: it comprises 3948 acres, whereof 120 are common or waste. There are quarries of stone used for repairing roads and for rough building. A fair is held on Trinity-Monday. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 11. 3.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. J. Buckingham, LL. B.; impropriator, M. Toat, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £301. 10., and the vicarial for £260; the glebe comprises 70 acres. The church is a very ancient structure, with a tower on the north side. There is a place of worship for Bryanites.

Burrington (St. George)

BURRINGTON (St. George), a parish, in the union of Ludlow, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Leintwardine; containing 230 inhabitants. This parish is one of the most northern in the county, being partly bounded on the east and north by Shropshire. It is situated on the banks of the river Teme, which is celebrated for its fine trout and graylings, and forms a beautiful feature in the diversified and interesting scenery of the district. The number of acres is estimated at 2580: the soil is a heavy loam approaching to clay; the surface is well wooded, and watered by many streams; the arable portion is elevated and undulating, but the meadows are flat, and frequently covered with water. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £5, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £191. 7. 6. payable to the vicar, and £5. 12. 6. to the Bishop of Hereford; the glebe consists of 45 acres. The church is an ancient structure. A small school is supported by Mrs. Knight.

Burrington (Holy Trinity)

BURRINGTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Brent with Wrington, E. division of Somerset, 12 miles (S. W.) from Bristol; containing 531 inhabitants. It is in a fertile district, and comprises 2009a. 2r. 9p., of which about 309 acres are arable, 662 pasture, and 1032 uncultivated down: the village is romantically situated on the northern side of the Mendip range of hills. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Inhabitants, subject to the approval of the rector of Wrington: the rector's tithes have been commuted for £33, and the glebe comprises 17½ acres; the perpetual curate's have been commuted for £147, and his glebe comprises 9½ acres. The church contains some fine screen-work. An ancient catacomb was discovered in 1795, containing about 50 skeletons.