Cabourn - Calcutt

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

467-471

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'Cabourn - Calcutt', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 467-471. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50851 Date accessed: 30 October 2014.


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Cabourn (St. Nicholas)

CABOURN (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Caistor, wapentake of Bradley-Haverstoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 1¾ mile (E. N. E.) from Caistor; containing 166 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Caistor to Great Grimsby, and in a small vale in the heart of the Lincolnshire Wolds, comprises 2492a. 3r. 35p. of land, the subsoil of which is chalk, used for manure, and for the roads. The village is small, but from the numerous foundations of buildings in a field adjoining the vicarage, appears to have been formerly of considerable extent. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 18. 4.; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Yarborough: the income, arising from land allotted in 1811, is about £200. The church is a very ancient massive structure with details of Norman architecture, and contains a large antique font.

Cabus

CABUS, a township, in the parish and union of Garstang, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (N.) from Garstang; containing 253 inhabitants. This place lies on the road from Garstang to Lancaster, and comprises 1323 acres of land. The Lancaster canal runs through. The court baron for Barnacre, Cabus, Cleveley, Holleth, Nateby, and Wyresdale is held here.

Cadbury (St. Michael)

CADBURY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Tiverton, hundred of Hayridge, Cullompton and N. divisions of Devon, 8½ miles (W. by S.) from Cullompton; containing 251 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Tiverton to Crediton, and comprises by computation 1697 acres, of which about 1000 are arable, 500 meadow and pasture, 72 orchard, and 136 woodland and waste; the surface is hilly, and the soil in general light, resting upon a stony substratum. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 4. 3., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £163; impropriator, G. S. Farston, Esq. The benefice is endowed with half of the great tithes, and there is a good glebe-house, with five acres of land. On the summit of a high hill called Cadbury Castle, is an inclosure nearly circular, consisting of a single vallum and fosse, supposed to be either of British or of Roman origin; near it some Roman coins were found in 1827.

Cadbury, North (St. Michael)

CADBURY, NORTH (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Catsash, E. division of Somerset, 3¼ miles (S.) from Castle-Cary; containing, with the hamlets of Galhampton and Woolston, 1075 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £28. 17. 3½., and in the patronage of Emmanuel College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £489. 12. 2., and the glebe comprises 143½ acres. The church is a stately and beautiful pile, pleasantly situated on the ridge of a hill. Overlooking the village is an intrenchment of an oval form, surrounded by a large double rampart, composed of loose limestone, the produce of the spot.

Cadbury, South (St. Thomas à Becket)

CADBURY, SOUTH (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Catsash, E. division of Somerset, 4½ miles (S.) from Castle-Cary; containing 254 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 3. 1½., and in the patronage of James Bennett, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and there is a glebe of 29½ acres. Near the village are the remains of one of the most famous ancient fortifications in England: it was situated on the northern extremity of a ridge of hills, and was encircled by four trenches; its figure inclined to a square, but conforming to the slope of the hill; the area is upwards of thirty acres. A higher work within, surrounded by a trench, is called King Arthur's Palace: the rampart is composed of large stones covered with earth, with only one entrance, from the east, guarded by six or seven trenches. Numerous Roman coins have been discovered; and the origin of the place may, with much probability, be ascribed to that people.

Caddington (All Saints)

CADDINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Luton, partly in the hundred of Flitt, county of Bedford, but chiefly in the hundred of Dacorum, county of Hertford, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Luton; containing 1747 inhabitants. It comprises 4515a. 2r. 27p., of which about 540 acres are meadow and pasture, 3700 arable, and 140 wood and coppice; the soil consists of clay, gravel, and chalk, and the timber is chiefly oak and ash. A pleasure-fair is held on Whit-Tuesday. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £319; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1798, and the glebe consists of 30 acres, with a good house. In addition to the parochial church, there is a chapel of ease near Market-Street. Here is a school with an endowment.

Cadeby (All Saints)

CADEBY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 1¼ mile (E. S. E.) from Market-Bosworth; containing, with the township of Osbaston, 387 inhabitants. It comprises 797a. 3p., of which about 240 acres are arable, 530 meadow and pasture, and 25 wood and plantations; part is a light soil well suited to turnips, and part good corn-land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 10. 2½., and in the patronage of Sir W. W. Dixie, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £175, and there is a glebe-house, with 54 acres of land.

Cadeby, or Cateby

CADEBY, or Cateby, a township, in the parish of Sprotbrough, union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (W. S. W.) from Doncaster; containing 153 inhabitants. The priory of Bretton and the establishment at Nostal held lands here; and among the families that have possessed property, occurs that of Metham, who settled at Cadeby about the reign of Edward II., and continued to hold it in the time of Elizabeth. The township is situated in the south part of the parish, and upon the river Don, opposite to Conisbrough, with which place it is connected by the King's ferry.

Cadeleigh (St. Bartholomew)

CADELEIGH (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Tiverton, hundred of Hayridge, Cullompton and N. divisions of Devon, 4¼ miles (S. W.) from Tiverton; containing 403 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13, and in the patronage of Mrs. Moore: the tithes have been commuted for £193, and the glebe consists of 53 acres, with a house. In the church is a curious ancient monument to the memory of Sir Simon Leach, Knt.

Cadley.—See Savernake-Forest.

CADLEY.—See Savernake-Forest.

Cadnam

CADNAM, a hamlet, partly in the parish of Eling, hundred of Redbridge, and partly in the parish of Minstead, N. division of the hundred of New Forest, Romsey and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4½ miles (N.) from Lyndhurst; containing 154 inhabitants. A chapel of ease to Eling was erected a few years since; and there is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Cadney (All Saints)

CADNEY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, S. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2¾ miles (S. S. E.) from Glandford-Brigg; containing, with the township of Housham, 438 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 4.; net income, £230; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Yarborough. In the church are a beautiful screen of carved oak, and a font of great antiquity noticed by Camden. A farmhouse in the parish, called Newstead Abbey, was a priory of Cistercian monks.

Caenby (St. Nicholas)

CAENBY (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the E. division of the wapentake of Aslacoe, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Spital; containing 185 inhabitants. The parish lies upon a slope, and comprises about 1600 acres, two-thirds of which are arable, 50 acres wood, and the rest pasture; it is bounded on the east by the river Ancholme, a small tributary of which runs through it. The soil consists of strong clay, sand, and a kind of red mould; and limestone is found on the higher grounds. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.; net income, £117; patron, Sir C. M. L. Monck, Bart.

Caerleon

CAERLEON, a market-town, in the parish of Llangattock, union of Newport, Caerleon division and hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 20½ miles (S. W.) from Monmouth, and 151½ (W.) from London; containing 1174 inhabitants. This place, called by the Britons Caerleon, "city of the legion," or, according to some, Caerllian, "city of the waters," was the Isca Silurum of the Romans, in the time of Claudius, whose second legion, being recalled from Germany, was stationed here under the command of Vespasian. It became the metropolis of that division of the island called Britannia Secunda, and one of the chief cities of the Romans, who fortified it with strong walls three miles in circuit, inclosing a quadrilateral area measuring 530 yards by 460. They erected temples, an amphitheatre, baths, aqueducts, and splendid dwellings of various descriptions, the magnificent remains of which, in the twelfth century, are described by Giraldus Cambrensis, as emulating the grandeur of Rome itself. In the reign of Domitian, St. Julian and St. Aaron preached the doctrine of Christianity in this part of Britain, and suffered martyrdom here; but after the final submission of the Britons to the Roman power, Caerleon became, under the auspices of Antoninus, the seat of learning and devotion. Two Christian churches were erected in honour of the martyrs Julian and Aaron, to which a nunnery, and a priory of Cistercian canons, were annexed respectively; also a third church, to which was added a monastery that afterwards became the metropolitan see of Wales, of which Dubricius, the great opponent of the Pelagian heresy, was the first archbishop. Under his successors the see continued to flourish to such an extent, that, at the time of the Saxon invasion, its college is said to have contained, among other students, not less than 200 who were well skilled in geography and astronomy; it was afterwards translated to Menevia by St. David, and has since that time been known as the see of St. David's. Some small remains of the monastery still exist. The castle was probably built about the time of the Conquest; but no mention of it occurs till the year 1171, when Henry II. seized the town, and deposed Iorwerth ab Owain, lord of Gwent, who, in 1173, retook it after a vigorous defence, and restored it to the Welsh. After repeated sieges it was retained by Llewelyn ab Iorwerth till the reign of Edward I., when, upon the overthrow of the independence of the Welsh, the town fell into neglect, and the castle into decay. The remains of the castle are inconsiderable.

The town is pleasantly situated on a gentle acclivity on the bank of the river Usk, over which is a handsome stone bridge of modern erection, and consists of two streets indifferently paved and lighted; the houses are mostly old and irregularly built, and are fast hastening to decay. Some fragments of the ancient wall still remain and bear testimony to the former extent and importance of the town. The trade consists principally in the manufacture and sale of tin plates and iron, for which there are two large establishments; the articles are conveyed to Newport by the river, in vessels of small burthen. The market is on Thursday; and fairs are held on July 31st and October 2nd, the latter being a large fair for horses. The market-house is a dilapidated edifice, supported on four massive pillars of the Tuscan order, which are supposed to have belonged to some Roman structure, two bases of similar dimensions and character having been dug up near the walls. The county magistrates hold a petty-session once a fortnight. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans; and a free school for 25 boys and 25 girls, founded and endowed in 1724, by Charles Williams, Esq. Several remains of the Roman station are still visible, and numerous minor relics have been discovered, consisting of parts of columns, altars, tessellated pavements, coins, urns, a statue of Jupiter, portions of the baths, &c. To the north of the town is an extensive quadrilateral encampment, with seven smaller camps near it; and on the banks of the Usk are considerable remains of the amphitheatre, called by the inhabitants King Arthur's Round Table. St. Amphibalus, tutor of the proto-martyr St. Albanus; and the martyrs St. Julian and St. Aaron, were born at this place. The renowned King Arthur is stated to have been interred here.

Caerton-ultra-Pontem

CAERTON-ultra-Pontem, a hamlet, in the parish of Christchurch, union of Newport, Lower division of the hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth; containing 267 inhabitants.

Caer-Went (St. Stephen)

CAER-WENT (St. Stephen), a parish, in the union and division of Chepstow, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 5½ miles (W. S. W.) from Chepstow, on the road to Newport; containing, with the hamlet of Crick, 446 inhabitants. The parishes of Caerwent and Llanvair-Discoed comprise by estimation 1736a. 7p., of which 953a. 1r. are arable, 511a. 20p. pasture and meadow, and 271a. 2r. 27p. woodland: for the most part, the surface is level, and the soil dry and gravelly. Caer-went, now an inconsiderable village, was anciently a Roman station, the Venta Silurum of Antoninus' Itinerary, and is supposed to have been the site of the capital city of the Britons in Siluria: it is still partially environed by the original Roman walls, inclosing an area about a mile in circumference. The turnpike-road to Newport, the course of which here runs upon part of the Akeman-street, passes through the centre, where formerly stood the eastern and western gates; and coins, fragments of columns, statues, and some beautiful tessellated pavements, belonging to the Romans, have been discovered. The village is pleasantly situated upon ground somewhat elevated above the level tract around it; and at a small distance are the magnificent remains of Caldicot Castle, formerly possessed by the Bohuns, earls of Hereford. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, and with the perpetual curacy of Llanvair-Discoed annexed; it is valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 8., and is in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Llandaff: the tithes have been commuted for £249. 2., and the glebe comprises 6 acres, with a house attached. The church, consisting of a nave and chancel, with a square embattled tower, exhibits portions of the early and decorated English styles. There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists. At Crick is a house, now a farm residence, in which King Charles was concealed for some time.

Cainham (St. Mary)

CAINHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Ludlow, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Ludlow; containing 973 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Leominster to Bridgnorth, and comprises by computation 2700 acres, in equal portions of arable and pasture, with numerous orchards: the river Letwytch, celebrated for fine trout, crosses its southern extremity. Stone is quarried for drains and buildings; and coal-mines, limeworks, and iron-foundries, are in operation. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.; net income, £338; patron and incumbent, the Rev. J. Mainwaring; impropriators, the landowners. There is a glebe-house, with 120 acres of land. The church is ancient; in the churchyard is a cross. A church was consecrated in 1840, to which an ecclesiastical district called St. Paul's, Knowbury, has been assigned. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a Sunday school. The remains of a Roman encampment are visible.—See Knowbury.

Cain's-Cross

CAIN'S-CROSS, a hamlet, partly in the parish of Stroud, hundred of Bisley, and partly in the parishes of Stonehouse and Randwick, hundred of Whitstone, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2 miles (W.) from Stroud. A district church, dedicated to St. Matthew, erected at an expense of £3600, raised chiefly by subscription, was consecrated on the 29th of January, 1837. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Colonel Daubeny, who endowed it with £1000, vested in the funds; the district comprises the villages of Cain's Cross, Ebley, Westrip, Dudbridge, and Pakenhill.

Caistor, or Castor (St. Peter and St. Paul)

CAISTOR, or Castor (St. Peter and St. Paul), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, partly in the N. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, but chiefly in the S. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 23 miles (N. N. E.) from Lincoln, and 153 (N.) from London; comprising the chapelries of Holton-le-Moor and Clixby, and the hamlets of Audleby, Fonaby, and Hundon; and containing 1988 inhabitants. This was evidently a station of the Romans, of whom numerous coins and other relics have been discovered. According to tradition, Hengist, after having repulsed the Picts and Scots, obtained from Vortigern the grant of so much land as he could encompass with the hide of an ox: having divided the hide into small thongs, he was enabled to inclose a considerable area, forming the site of the town, which, from that circumstance, was called by the Saxons Thuang Ceastre or Thong Ceastre. Dr. Stukeley, however, derives the prefix from the Saxon thegn, a thane or nobleman. The marriage of Rowena, daughter of Hengist, to Vortigern, was solemnised here in 453. Egbert, who finally brought the several kingdoms of the heptarchy under his dominion, obtained a signal victory at this place over Wiglof, King of Mercia, in 827; in commemoration of which a cross was erected on the castle hill, where many bodies have been dug up, and a stone with a mutilated inscription, apparently recording the dedication of the spoils by the victor to some sacred purpose.

The town, which commands extensive prospects over the vale of the Ancholme and the western ridges of the Wolds, is well supplied with water from four springs issuing out of a grey-stone rock, three of which unite their streams on the western side of it, and fall into the Ancholme; the other flows into the same river near the junction of the Kelsey canal with that to GlandfordBrigg. Its market is on Saturday; and fairs are held on the Saturdays before Palm-Sunday, Whit-Sunday, and Old Michaelmas-day. The town is within the jurisdiction of the county magistrates: the powers of the county debt-court of Caistor, established in 1847, extend over the sub-registration-district of Caistor. The parish comprises an area of 3220a. 3r. 28p. of land, including Caistor moor, which extends three miles west, and was inclosed in 1798; the soil is partly sandy, generally fertile, and well cultivated. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the living of Clixby annexed, valued in the king's books at £7. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Prebendary of Caistor in the Cathedral of Lincoln, with a net income of £250. The tithes of Caistor were commuted at the inclosure for 91 acres of land to the impropriator, and 80 acres to the vicar; but the hamlets of Audleby, Fonaby, and Hundon pay a yearly modus of £252. 7. to the former, and one of £180 to the latter. The church is a spacious structure in the early English style, with some remains of Norman architecture: it has a fine tower, with a chapel on the south side, now used as a vestry-room; and stands within the area of the ancient castle, with the materials of which it is partly built. A singular ceremony has been long observed, on the performance of which is said to depend the tenure of an estate in the parish of Broughton. The holder sends an agent on PalmSunday, who cracks a whip three times in the north porch of the church, while the minister is reading the first lesson; after which, attaching a small purse to the thong, he enters the church, and on the commencement of the second lesson, flourishes the whip thrice, and on the conclusion of it retires into the chancel: when the service is ended, the whip and purse are deposited in the manor-house at Hundon. The ceremony, however, was not observed in the year 1847. There are places of worship for Independents and Methodists. The free grammar school was founded in 1630, by the Rev. Francis Rawlinson, who endowed it with £400, afterwards laid out in the purchase of a portion of the great tithes of Beesby, now producing £130 per annum; besides which there are £60 a year, arising from land bought with a donation by Wm. Hansard, Esq. The school has an exhibition of £10 per annum to Jesus College, Cambridge: the building was thoroughly repaired in 1838, at a cost of £200, raised by subscription. The poor law union of Caistor comprises 76 parishes or places, and contains a population of 27,068.

Caistor (St. Edmund's)

CAISTOR (St. Edmund's), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (S.) from Norwich; containing 147 inhabitants. This place, though at present inconsiderable, was one of the most flourishing cities of the Britons, and the residence of the kings of the Iceni; it was also the Venta Icenorum of the Romans, and the principal station of that people in the territory of the Iceni, from the ruins of which the present city of Norwich gradually rose. The walls of the ancient city, which was deserted after the departure of the Romans in 446, were in the form of a parallelogram, inclosing an area of about 32 acres, within which foundations of buildings may be traced. The remains consist of a single fosse and vallum, and were surrounded by a strong wall as an additional rampart, built upon the vallum, the inclosed space being capable of containing 6000 men. On the north, east, and south sides, are large mounds raised from the fosse, and the west side has one formed on the margin of the river Taas, as are also the remains of the Water-Gate. Within the area of the camp, at the south-east angle, stands the church, the materials for building which were evidently taken from the ruins of the rampart. The parish comprises about 1045 acres: the river Taas, which once filled the whole valley, is now an inconsiderable stream. The living is a rectory, with that of Merkshall or Mattishall-Heath united, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the patronage of Mrs. H. Dashwood: the tithes have been commuted for £445, and the glebe comprises 58½ acres, with a house. The church is partly in the early style, with a square embattled tower, and has a font exhibiting very curious sculpture.

Caistor near Yarmouth (St. Edmund)

CAISTOR near Yarmouth (St. Edmund), a parish, in the East and West Flegg incorporation, hundred of East Flegg, E. division of Norfolk, 19½ miles (E.) from Norwich; containing 909 inhabitants. The name is a corrupted Saxonism of Castrum; it being clear, from the visible remains of fortifications, and the discovery of numerous coins, that the Romans had a camp here, opposite to, and connected with, Garianonum. The manor was anciently in the possession of the family of Fastolf; and Sir John Fastolf, a celebrated warrior and an estimable man, whose character some consider Shakspeare to have pervertedly drawn in his Sir John Falstaff, was born here. He was the founder of the castle, the cost of which was defrayed with money obtained for the ransom of the Duke d'Alencon, whom he had taken prisoner at the battle of Agincourt; it was supposed to be one of the oldest brick mansions in the kingdom, and was a castellated edifice in the form of a parallelogram, of which nothing now remains, except a circular tower about 90 feet high, with portions of the north and west walls. Eastward of the castle stood a college, forming three sides of a spacious square, with two circular towers; it was established in the reign of Edward I. by one of the Fastolfs, and afterwards patronized by the founder of the castle, and his successors, till its dissolution: the remains have been converted into stables and a barn. Caistor was formerly in two parishes, Trinity and St. Edmund's, which were consolidated September 22nd, 1608; the church belonging to the former has been suffered to fall into ruins. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £875; patron and incumbent, the Rev. G. W. Steward, who lately erected a handsome glebe-house. The church is chiefly in the decorated style, and consists of a nave, chancel, and south aisle, with a square embattled tower. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have places of worship. The sum of £105, the rental of land devised by Elizabeth Blennerhaysett, Sir William Paston, and others, is annually applied in relief for the poor. A line of sand-hills called the Meals or Marum Hills, commences here, and extends, with occasional interruptions, to Hapsbury Point, and thence to Cromer bay.

Caistron

CAISTRON, a township, in the parish and union of Rothbury, W. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 4½ miles (W.) from Rothbury; containing 54 inhabitants. This pleasant village, around which is a fertile alluvial soil, is situated on the brink of the Coquet, one mile south-by-west from Flotterton. It was formerly the property of three persons of the name of Hall, called respectively in the neighbourhood, duke, lord, and lawyer, and one of whom bequeathed, in 1779, the annual sum of £4. 15. to be paid out of his estate towards the support of a schoolmaster in the place. A school-house was erected in 1792, with money left by the Rev. John Tomlinson and others.

Cakemore

CAKEMORE, a township, in the parish of HalesOwen, union of Stourbridge, Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Hales-Owen and E. divisions of Worcestershire; containing 357 inhabitants. This place, which was until lately in the county of Salop, is situated on the borders of Staffordshire, and northnorth-east of the town of Hales-Owen.

Calbourn (All Saints)

CALBOURN (All Saints), a parish, in the liberty of West Medina, Isle of Wight division of the county of Southampton, 5¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Newport; containing, with the chapelry of Newton, 750 inhabitants. The parish derives its name from the beautiful stream by which it is intersected: it comprises 5370 acres, whereof 200 are common or waste; the surface is varied, and the scenery abounds with interest. Stone of very durable quality is extensively quarried for building purposes, for which it is in great repute. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 12. 8½., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £660, and the glebe comprises 80½ acres. The church is a handsome structure in the early English style, and contains an ancient tomb, inlaid with brass, representing a knight in complete armour, with his feet resting on a dog; considerable improvements were lately made. Dr. Fisher, Bishop of Salisbury, was a native of the parish, of which his father was rector.

Calceby (St. Andrew)

CALCEBY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4¾ miles (W.) from Alford; containing 52 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Wainfleet to Great Grimsby, and comprises about 618 acres; it lies towards the southern extremity of the chalk formation of the county, of which a bold line of hills in the neighbouring parish of Drily forms part of the eastern escarpment towards the sea. The living is a discharged vicarage, united, in 1774, to the rectory of South Ormsby, and valued in the king's books at £5. 10. 2½.; impropriator, C. B. Massingberd, Esq.

Calcethorpe (St. Faith)

CALCETHORPE (St. Faith), a parish, in the union of Louth, Wold division of the hundred of LouthEske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 6 miles (W. by N.) from Louth; containing 69 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1100 acres, which are all arable, with the exception of 150 acres of grass land. The living is a sinecure rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 2. 6.; net income, £16; patron, W. Briscoe, Esq. The church is a ruin.

Calcutt

CALCUTT, a hamlet, in the parish of Lower Heyford, union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford; containing 146 inhabitants.



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