Carlton - Carnaby

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

520-523

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'Carlton - Carnaby', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 520-523. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50858 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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Carlton.—See Carleton.

CARLTON.—See Carleton.

Carlton (St. Mary)

CARLTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Willey, union and county of Bedford, 1½ mile (S.) from Harrold; containing 444 inhabitants. It was formerly much intermixed with the parish of Chellington, but under an act of inclosure, in 1801, a distinct boundary was established. The living is a rectory, with that of Chellington united in 1769, valued in the king's books at £15. 6. 8.; net income, £370; patron, the Hon. G. R. Trevor. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1805. The church contains a tablet on which is recorded the long incumbency of the Rev. Thomas Wills, who was seventy years minister. There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists.

Carlton (St. Peter)

CARLTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Linton, hundred of Radfield, county of Cambridge, 7 miles (S.) from Newmarket; containing, with the hamlet of Willingham, 424 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 2200 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £287; patrons, Trustees of the Rev. W. S. P. Wilder. The church is a plain edifice. Sir Thomas Elliott, author of a Latin Dictionary, and other works, resided here, and dying in 1546, was buried in the church.

Carlton

CARLTON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 1¾ mile (N. by W.) from Market-Bosworth; containing 282 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary. The Ashby canal crosses the south-west angle of the chapelry.

Carlton

CARLTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Gedling, union of Basford, S. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton and of the county of Nottingham, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from Nottingham; containing 2015 inhabitants. The hamlet comprises 1404 acres, and its village is the largest in the parish; the hills near it command extensive views of Nottingham, and the vale of the Trent. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the lace and hosiery manufactures, there being more than 400 stocking-frames in the village. Courts leet are held in April and October. Here is a station of the Nottingham and Lincoln railway. The Baptists and Wesleyans have places of worship.

Carlton (St. Peter)

CARLTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Blything, hundred of Hoxne, locally in that of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, ½ a mile (N. by W.) from Saxmundham; containing 133 inhabitants, and comprising 450 acres. The living is a rectory, consolidated in 1679 with that of Kelsale, and valued in the king's books at £3. 11. 0½.: the tithes of Carlton have been commuted for £137. A chantry was founded here about 1330, by John Framlingham, rector of Kelsale, for three chaplains to pray for the soul of Alice of Hainault, Countess Marshal.

Carlton

CARLTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Husthwaite, union of Easingwould, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 5¾ miles (N. N. W.) from Easingwould; containing 171 inhabitants. It comprises 765a. 3r. 37p. of fertile land: the village is pleasantly situated on the road between Husthwaite and Little Thirkleby. The chapel is an ancient structure, annexed to the curacy of Husthwaite. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £214. 15., payable to Trinity College, Cambridge; and there is a glebe of about 4 acres.

Carlton

CARLTON, a township, in the parish of Coverham, union of Leyburn, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Middleham; containing 303 inhabitants. This village, which was formerly of much greater extent than it is at present, and had a capital messuage called the Hall, is situated on the north-west of the river Cover; and the township, usually styled Carlton Town to distinguish it from a neighbouring district of the same name, comprises about 3380 acres, chiefly high moors and fells. A schoolhouse was erected in 1835, where divine service is performed, under a licence from the bishop; and there is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a close designated Quaker Garth, where it is probable that sect had once a meeting-house and burial-ground.

Carlton, with Lofthouse.—See Lofthouse.

CARLTON, with Lofthouse.—See Lofthouse.

Carlton

CARLTON, a township, in the parish of Guiseley, Upper division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 2 miles (S. E.) from Otley; containing 205 inhabitants, including the inmates of a workhouse erected here in 1818 for an incorporation under Gilbert's act, comprising forty townships. It consists of about 1270 acres of land, and has a small scattered village, lying at the distance of 2 miles to the north of Guiseley. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an inclosure act, in 1772.

Carlton

CARLTON, a township, in the parish of Royston, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. N. E.) from Barnsley; containing 411 inhabitants. The monastery of Bretton had possessions here; and at St. Ellen's Well, in the township, was a house belonging to that establishment, which was used as a place of retirement by the prior: there were also a chapel, where a priest said the morning mass; and a well "to which," says Dodsworth, "they used to come on pilgrimage." The township comprises by computation 2090 acres of fertile land, of which upwards of 200 are wood and plantations: Lord Wharncliffe is lord of the manor, and principal owner of the soil. The village is situated near the Barnsley canal, and the road from Barnsley to Wakefield passes on the west of it, at the distance of about two miles. In the neighbourhood are several handsome residences.

Carlton, Castle (Holy Cross)

CARLTON, CASTLE (Holy Cross), a parish, in the union of Louth, Marsh division of the hundred of Louth-Eske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 6 miles (S. E. by S.) from Louth; containing 52 inhabitants. This place, which was once a populous markettown, enjoying many privileges granted by Henry I., derives its distinguishing appellation from an ancient castle, the baronial residence of Sir Hugh Bardolph, occupying one of three artificial mounts, each surrounded by a moat still visible. The parish comprises by computation 443 acres, of which 336 are arable, about 77 pasture, and 30 wood. The living is a rectory not in charge; net income, £69; patron, John Forster, Esq. The church has been enlarged by the addition of a chancel, and repewed.

Carlton-Colville (St. Peter)

CARLTON-COLVILLE (St. Peter), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Mutford and Lothingland, E. division of Suffolk, 3½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Lowestoft; containing 785 inhabitants. The parish has Mutford broad on the north, and the navigable river Waveney on the north-west; it comprises by measurement 2902 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 10. 7½., and in the gift of the family of Anguish: the tithes have been commuted for £387, and the glebe comprises 17½ acres. The church is a handsome structure chiefly in the early English style, with a square embattled tower; it has a curiously sculptured font, and displays some details of a later period.

Carlton-Curlieu (St. Mary)

CARLTON-CURLIEU (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Billesdon, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 7½ miles (N. N. W.) from Market-Harborough; containing, with the chapelry of Ilston-on-the-Hill, 208 inhabitants, of whom 57 are in Carlton-Curlieu. The ancient manor-house affords a specimen of the Elizabethan style of architecture, though, from a date, it does not appear to have been finished until the time of Charles I.; it is chiefly built of fine stone from Ketton, in Rutlandshire, and was purchased at the termination of the civil war, by Sir Geoffrey Palmer, the first baronet. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 15. 10.; net income, £242; patron, Sir J. H. Palmer. There is a chapel of ease at Ilston.

Carlton, East

CARLTON, EAST, comprising the united parishes of St. Mary and St. Peter the Apostle, in the union of Henstead, hundred of Humbleyard, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (S. W. by S.) from Norwich; containing 310 inhabitants, and including 850 acres. The corporation of Norwich purchased the principal manor, and holds it upon condition of carrying yearly to the king's house, wherever he may be, provided he be in England, twenty-four pies or pasties, containing a hundred herrings, which latter the town of Yarmouth is bound to supply. The living of St. Mary's is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4, and till lately in the patronage of the Corporation; net income, £176. St. Peter's is a discharged sinecure rectory, valued at £6, and in the gift of the Crown; net income, £188. The two churches stood within fifty yards of each other; that of St. Peter has fallen into ruins. St. Mary's is chiefly in the early English style, and has a tower surmounted by a wooden spire.

Carlton, East (St. Peter)

CARLTON, EAST (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Kettering, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Market-Harborough; containing 68 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Welland, and comprises 1600a. 5p., of which about 1000 acres are meadow and pasture, 188 wood, and the rest arable: it is crossed by the road from Harborough to Rockingham. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 3.; net income, £108; patron, Sir J. H. Palmer, Bart. The church and the family mansion were rebuilt by the late proprietor: attached to the latter is a small park, which has been much improved by the addition of some beautiful grounds in the adjoining township of Middleton. An hospital, now occupied by five women, was founded in 1668, by Sir Geoffrey Palmer, who endowed it with forty-six acres of land in the forest of Leighfield; and Lady Mary Palmer, in 1711, bequeathed the principal part of a fund of £32 per annum for apprenticing children.

Carlton, Great (St. John the Baptist)

CARLTON, GREAT (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Louth, Marsh division of the hundred of Louth-Eske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7½ miles (E. S. E.) from Louth; containing 352 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2196 acres, of which about 1327 are arable, and the rest pasture. The village, which is pleasant and well built, is situated near the source of a rivulet. The living is a vicarage, not in charge, endowed with the rectorial tithes, and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln; net income, £571, arising from 300 acres of land, and the tithes which have been commuted for £61. The church is an ancient edifice, lately repaired and beautified. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school, erected by Sir Edward Smith, Bart., in 1716, is endowed with £20 per annum; four acres of land, yielding a rent of £6, were added on inclosing the lordship of Carlton Castle.

Carlton-Highdale

CARLTON-HIGHDALE, a township, in the parish of Coverham, union of Leyburn, wapentake of HangWest, N. riding of York; varying from 6½ to 16 miles (S. W. by W.) from Middleham, and containing 385 inhabitants. This district, which is co-extensive with the chapelry of Horsehouse, and comprises about 12,480 acres of land, consists chiefly of wild and romantic tracts, a large portion occupying the sides of Coverdale. It includes the hamlets of Arkleside, Blackrake, Coverhead, Bradley, Gammersgill, Horsehouse, Swineside, Woodale, and Pickle; all on the banks of the river Cover. Lead-ore is found in some of the lofty moors.

Carlton-In-Lindrick (St. John)

CARLTON-IN-LINDRICK (St. John), a parish, in the union of Worksop, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 3¾ miles (N. by E.) from Worksop; containing, in the north and south divisions, 1047 inhabitants. This appears to have been a place of some importance before the Conquest, from the many vestiges of antiquity still visible. A considerable trade is carried on in malt, which is chiefly disposed of at Manchester and Stockport. The parish comprises 4073a. 25p.: the great road between Doncaster and Nottingham runs through the village, and the Chesterfield canal within three miles. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 13. 4.; net income, £576; patron, the Archbishop of York. The tithes were commuted for 541 acres of land in 1767, and there is an excellent glebehouse. The church, which is a spacious edifice chiefly in the Norman style, has a fine arch at the principal entrance; the tower and the nave are in a later style, and the north and south aisles have been erected within the last few years.

Carlton Islebeck or Miniott

CARLTON ISLEBECK or MINIOTT, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Thirsk, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 2½ miles (W. by S.) from Thirsk; containing 313 inhabitants. It comprises 1533 acres, of which 25a. 2r. 29p. are roads and waste: the village is pleasantly situated on the road from Thirsk to Ripon, and about one mile west of the York and Newcastle railway. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £103, and in the patronage of the Archbishop of York, who is appropriator, and whose tithes have been commuted for £247; those of the perpetual curate of the parish produce £73, and those of the rector of Kirby-Knowle £16. The chapel is small. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Carlton, Little (St. Edith)

CARLTON, LITTLE (St. Edith), a parish, in the union of Louth, Marsh division of the hundred of Louth-Eske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7 miles (E. S. E.) from Louth; containing 136 inhabitants. It comprises 1006a. 1r. 37p., of which 621 acres are arable, and 383 pasture; about 400 acres were inclosed a few years ago. Uphall, a large ancient mansion, stands a little west of the village. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 16. 10½., and in the gift of John Forster, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £195. 5., and the glebe consists of 16 acres. The church is a neat small edifice, erected about twelve years ago on the site of a forme one.

Carlton-Le-Moorlands (St. Mary)

CARLTON-LE-MOORLANDS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newark, Lower division of the wapentake of Boothby-Graffo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 10 miles (S. W. by W.) from Lincoln; containing 331 inhabitants. It is bounded on the east by the river Brant, and on the west by the Witham, and comprises by measurement 2060 acres; the soil is generally a fertile hazle loam. The village, which is well built, is on one of the tributary streams of the Brant. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 0. 10.; net income, £90; patron and impropriator, Lord Middleton. The church is a neat plain structure, with a fine tower. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Carlton, North

CARLTON, NORTH, a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 4½ miles (N. N. W.) from Lincoln; containing 178 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1800 acres of land; and has a pleasant village, situated on the acclivity of a picturesque vale. North Carlton Hall, a large mansion in the Elizabethan style, was formerly a seat of the Monson family. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £35; patron, the Prebendary of Carlton in the Cathedral of Lincoln. The church was rebuilt about 80 years ago. The poor participate in the benefits of Monson's almshouses at Burton, and the free school at South Carlton.

Carlton-Rode (All Saints)

CARLTON-RODE (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Depwade, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (S. E. by E.) from Attleborough; containing 938 inhabitants. It is said to take its distinguishing appellation from its ancient lord, Walter de Rode, who lived in the reign of Henry III. The road from New Buckenham to Norwich runs through the parish, which comprises about 2600 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £16, and in the gift of Sir R. J. Buxton, Bart.: the tithes' have been commuted for £921, and the glebe consists of about 49 acres, with an excellent glebe-house, which has been considerably improved by the Rev. Francis Bevan. The church is a handsome structure, chiefly in the later English style, and has a low embattled tower; the nave is lighted by clerestory windows, and is separated from the chancel by the remains of a well-executed carved screen, on which are painted, with gilding, representations of the Twelve Apostles. There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists. Here are the ruins of a free chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary.

Carlton-Scroop (St. Nicholas)

CARLTON-SCROOP (St. Nicholas), a parish in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Grantham; containing 219 inhabitants. It is on the road from Grantham to Lincoln, and comprises 1347a. 27p. of land. The village, which is straggling, is seated on a declivity of the Wolds, in the vicinity of a small rivulet. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 1. 5½.; patrons, Earl Brownlow, Sir Robert Bromley, Bart., and George White, Esq., who present in turn. The tithes have been commuted for £380, and the glebe comprises 39 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is an ancient structure; the lower part of the tower is Anglo-Norman, and there is a large arch, of the same style, opening into the nave.

Carlton, South

CARLTON, SOUTH, a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 3½ miles (N. N. W.) from Lincoln; containing 166 inhabitants. This was the principal seat, until their removal to Burton, of the Monson family, of whom Sir Thomas Monson was master falconer and master of the armoury to James I., by whom he was created one of the first baronets. The parish comprises about 2000 acres, and has a pleasant village seated near the foot of an abrupt acclivity, about a mile south of the village of North Carlton. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £200, in the patronage of the Bishop of Lincoln. The church, an ancient structure, underwent extensive repairs in 1812: beneath is a vault, still the burial-place of the Monson family; and there are several mural monuments to the Monsons and others, in the church. A school was built and endowed in 1678, by John Monson. Two widows of this parish are inmates of the almshouses at Burton.

Carlton-Upon-Trent

CARLTON-UPON-TRENT, a chapelry, in the parish of Norwell, union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 6¾ miles (N.) from Newark; containing 230 inhabitants. It is situated on the great north road, and comprises upwards of 1000 acres of land. At the distance of a quarter of a mile east of the village, is a ferry over the Trent, which bounds the chapelry. Carlton House, built in the last century, was long the seat of Sir William Earle Welby, Bart. The tithes were commuted for land in 1765. The chapel is a small ancient building, with a brick tower.

Carnaby (St. John the Baptist)

CARNABY (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Bridlington, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 3½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Bridlington; containing 185 inhabitants. This place, which is situated on the road between Bridlington and Driffield, comprises about 2000 acres: good limestone is quarried. Sir George Strickland, Bart., is lord of the manor, and chief owner of the soil. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 8. 11½., and with the perpetual curacy of Fraisthorpe annexed; net income, £82; patron and impropriator, Sir George Strickland. The church is a small edifice, with an embattled tower.