Colkirk - Coltishall

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

663-668

Citation Show another format:

'Colkirk - Coltishall', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 663-668. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50890 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Colkirk (St. Mary)

COLKIRK (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Launditch, W. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (S.) from Fakenham; containing about 460 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1487a. 21p., of which 955 acres are arable, 392 meadow and pasture, and 140 woodland; the surface is elevated, and the scenery interesting. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Stibbard annexed, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the patronage of the Townshend family: the tithes have been commuted for £456. 16. 9., and the glebe comprises 46 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. The poor have £25 per annum from a house bequeathed by Samuel Collison and another, in 1767; also 7 acres of land, let for £7 per annum.

Collierly

COLLIERLY, a township, in the parish and union of Lanchester, W. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 10½ miles (S. W.) from Gateshead; containing, with the villages of Dipton and Pontop, 853 inhabitants. About sixty years ago this township was nearly all waste and uninclosed land, and very thinly inhabited; but by the recommencement of coal-mining (formerly carried on to a considerable extent, and employing numerous people), and the formation of a railway, it has acquired its present importance and increased population. The township comprises by computation 1700 acres, of which about 500, mostly arable, are the property of the Marquess of Bute; the soil is chiefly clay, and, though cold and inferior, produces good oats. The surface is generally elevated; Pontop Pyke is the highest ground in the district, being upwards of 1000 feet above the level of the sea. The Pontop Pyke colliery was first opened in the year 1743, and the working of it was renewed in 1834 by the Stanhope and Tyne Railway Company: the railway passes through the district, and conveys the coal to the shipping at Shields. The townships of Collierly, Kyo (containing the populous village of Annfield), Billingside, and part of Greencroft, were formed, in 1842, into a district parish for ecclesiastical purposes, with a population of 2000. A church dedicated to St. Thomas had been consecrated in 1841; it is a neat structure in the early English style, with a campanile tower and lancet windows, and contains 300 sittings, of which 250 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patron, the Bishop of Durham. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans.

Colliers-End

COLLIERS-END, a hamlet, in the parish of Standon, union of Ware, hundred of Braughin, county of Hertford; containing 233 inhabitants.

Collingbourn-Ducis (St. Andrew)

COLLINGBOURN-DUCIS (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Pewsey, hundred of Elstub and Everley, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of Wilts, 9 miles (S. E.) from Pewsey; containing 518 inhabitants. This place was formerly part of the duchy of Lancaster, from which it acquired the adjunct to its name; Henry VIII. alienated it to the Earl of Hertford, afterwards Duke of Somerset, and Protector of England, upon whose attainder it reverted to the crown, and was granted by Queen Elizabeth to Edward, Earl of Hertford. The parish is on the road between Andover and Marlborough, and comprises by measurement 3241 acres, the soil of which is generally of a light clayey nature; the surface is varied, rising in several parts into hills of considerable elevation, and the village, situated on a plain, is watered by a small rivulet. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Marquess of Ailesbury: the tithes have been commuted for £626, and the glebe contains about 58 acres, with a glebe-house.

Collingbourn-Kingstone (St. Mary)

COLLINGBOURN-KINGSTONE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Pewsey, hundred of Kinwardstone, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (N. N. W.) from Ludgershall; containing 933 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 7. 3½.; net income, £261; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Winchester. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. John Norris, eminent as a divine and philosopher, was born at the vicarage-house, in 1567.

Collingham (St. Oswald)

COLLINGHAM (St. Oswald), a parish, in the Lower division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 1½ mile (S. S. W.) from Wetherby; containing 324 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Wharfe, and contains some beautiful scenery; it comprises about 2500 acres, of which 150 acres are woodland, and about two-thirds of the remainder arable. Sandstone of excellent quality is found in abundance. Beilby-Grange, in Micklethwaite, the seat of Alexander Browne, Esq., was purchased from Lord Wenlock in 1841; the noble mansion is surrounded by an extensive park, and the present owner has added much to its beauty. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £3. 11. 5½., and in the gift of Mrs. Wheler, with a net income of £414: the vicarage-house is picturesquely situated. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1814. A school was founded in 1738, and is endowed with £34 per annum, from funds arising from a bequest by Lady Elizabeth Hastings.

Collingham, North (All Saints)

COLLINGHAM, NORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the wapentake, of Newark, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Newark; containing 911 inhabitants. This place is situated a mile from the river Trent, and on the Midland railway; the surface is level, and generally well wooded. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 14. 2.; net income, £92; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Peterborough. The church is partly of the early English style; the tower, aisles, porches, and clerestory were added in the 15th century. The Particular Baptists have a place of worship; and a school is supported by an endowment in land, the rent of which is £39 per annum. There are considerable remains of the village cross, a plain and solid structure, apparently an erection of the 14th century.

Collingham, South (St. John the Baptist)

COLLINGHAM, SOUTH (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the wapentake, of Newark, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 5½ miles (N. N. E.) from Newark; containing 721 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Newark to Gainsborough, and bounded on the west by the river Trent, consists of 2862a. 2r. 25p.; the surface, though generally flat, acquires a degree of elevation towards the east. The soil is extremely various, comprising almost every variety, from the richest loam to the most sterile heath; near the village it is sandy, but well adapted to the growth of early vegetables, of which large quantities are raised. In the centre of the village is a magnificent elm, planted in 1745 to commemorate the retreat of the Pretender from Derby. The Collingham station of the Nottingham and Lincoln railway is 10½ miles from the Lincoln station, and 5¼ from that of Newark. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 1. 10½.; gross income, £426; patron, the Bishop of Peterborough. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1790. The church was built at various periods, the most ancient part being the piers and arches on the north side, which are of the 12th century, very massive and richly ornamented with zigzag and other mouldings; the piers of the south side are of the early English style, with plain pointed arches. The chancel is of the 14th century, with square-headed windows; the east window, which is large and of five lights, was added late in the 15th century: the tower, aisles, porch, and clerestory are of the same period. There are two places of worship for Wesleyans; and a national school supported by subscription. Here is a place called Potter's Hill, where many Roman relics have been found; and south of this, on the Fosse-road, on the Lincolnshire boundary, is the site of the Crocolana of Antoninus, now occupied by the village of Brough, where coins, termed Brugh pennies, have been ploughed up, and ancient foundations often discovered. Human bones, with remains of coffins, have also been turned up in a place called the Chapel Close, in the scattered hamlet of Danethorpe; where was formerly a chapel connected with the priory of Thurgarton.

Collington (All Saints)

COLLINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 4½ miles (N.) from Bromyard; containing 160 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Bromyard to Tenbury, and comprises 936 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 18. 10., and in the gift of W. Lacon Childe, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £140. 1. 9., and the glebe contains 42 acres.

Collingtree (St. Columbus)

COLLINGTREE (St. Columbus), a parish, in the union of Hardingstone, hundred of Wymmersley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 3½ miles (S.) from Northampton; containing 232 inhabitants. The parish comprises by admeasurement 646 acres, of level surface: the soil is various, part being a strong clay; near the village, rich grazing-land; and in other parts sandy. The village is within two miles of the Blisworth station on the London and Birmingham railway; and the road from Northampton to Stony-Stratford intersects the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 10. 5.; net income, £331; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Benjamin Hill. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1779; the glebe contains about 238 acres, and a glebe-house. Besides the church, there is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Collow

COLLOW, a hamlet, in the parish of Legsby, union of Caistor, W. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 23 inhabitants. It lies south of Legsby village.

Collumpton.—See Cullompton.

COLLUMPTON.—See Cullompton.

Colly-Weston (St. Andrew)

COLLY-WESTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Stamford, hundred of Willybrook, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Stamford; containing 434 inhabitants. This place is situated on a very high hill, rising from the river Welland, and is intersected by the Stamford and Kettering road; it consists of 1321a. 2r. 16p. There are extensive quarries, the material of which becomes excellent slate when exposed to the frost, and supplies the neighbourhood for many miles around. An act for inclosing lands was passed in 1841. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 9. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £302. 10., and the glebe contains 50 acres, with a glebe-house.

Colmworth (St. Denis)

COLMWORTH (St. Denis), a parish, in the hundred of Bradford, union and county of Bedford, 5½ miles (W. by S.) from St. Neot's; containing 575 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 2300 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18; patron and incumbent, the Rev. W. Gery. The tithes were commuted, at the recent inclosure of the parish, for about 450 acres of land, valued at 15s. per acre per annum. The church is a handsome structure with a lofty spire, in the early English style: the chancel has an elegant window of large dimensions, and contains a monument in alabaster to Sir William Dyer, a descendant of Judge Dyer; in the wall is a brass with the date 1389. A school on the national plan is supported by a bequest of £300 three per cents. by the late Rev. R. S. Hill, rector.

Coln St. Denis

COLN ST. DENIS, a parish, in the union of Northleach, Upper division of the hundred of Deerhurst, though locally in the hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 3 miles (S. W. by S.) from Northleach; containing 200 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south-west by the river Coln, and on the northwest by the old Roman Fosse-way; and comprises by computation 1800 acres, of which the soil is light and stony, and the surface hilly: stone is quarried for common buildings, and the repair of roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 19. 4½.; net income, £450; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Pembroke College, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents, in 1797; the glebe contains 70 acres, with a glebe-house.

Coln St. Aldwin's (St. John the Baptist)

COLN ST. ALDWIN'S (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Brightwells-Barrow, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 3 miles (N.) from Fairford; containing 428 inhabitants. It is pleasantly situated on an eminence, rising gently from the river Coln, and comprises by computation 2000 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 19. 4½.; net income, £90; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Gloucester. The tithes were commuted for land in 1769. The church is an ancient structure, partly in the Norman and partly in the early English style.

Coln-Rogers (St. Andrew)

COLN-ROGERS (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Northleach; containing 137 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north-east by the river Coln, and comprises about 1400 acres, of which the surface is irregular, and the soil is in some portions clayey and wet, and in others stony. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 0. 5., and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Gloucester; the tithes have been commuted for £250, and the glebe contains about 40 acres, with a house.

Colnbrook

COLNBROOK, a chapelry, and formerly a markettown, partly in the parish of Stanwell, hundred of Spelthorne, county of Middlesex, but chiefly in the parishes of Horton, Iver, and Langley-Marish, hundred of Stoke, union of Eton, county of Buckingham, 46 miles (S. E. by S.) from Buckingham, and 17 (W. by S.) from London, on the road to Bath; containing 1050 inhabitants. This place, which is of great antiquity, is supposed to have been the station Ad Pontes of Antoninus: it derives its name from the river Colne, by which it is separated from Middlesex, and is intersected by different branches of that river, over each of which is a small bridge. The town consists principally of one long street, and the houses are in general neatly built, and of respectable appearance. The trade chiefly arises from its situation as a great thoroughfare, and till lately it was a considerable posting town; it is about a mile and three-quarters distant from the Great Western railway. The market has long been discontinued, and the market-house and the chapel, which were inconveniently situated in the narrower part of the town, have been removed by the commissioners of the turnpikeroads, who have built a new chapel, a neat edifice, dedicated to St. Mary. Fairs are held on April 5th and May 3rd, for cattle and horses. The government, by charter of Henry VIII., renewed in the reign of Charles I., is vested in a bailiff and burgesses. The living is a donative; net income, £103; patrons, Trustees of the late George Townsend, Esq., for fellows of Pembroke College, Oxford. There is a place of worship for Baptists; and several charitable bequests have been made, the principal of which is one by Thomas Pitt, in the year 1657, of some land now producing £32 per annum, for distribution among the poor.

Colne (St. Helen)

COLNE (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of St. Ives, hundred of Hurstingstone, county of Huntingdon, 5 miles (N. E.) from St. Ives; containing 544 inhabitants. It comprises about 2000 acres, of which the surface is very flat, and the soil among the finest in the kingdom, land letting for about £3 per acre. The living is annexed, with that of Pidley, to the rectory of Somersham: the tithes have been commuted for £540. The church is in the early English style, with a western tower, and contains some remains of figures and armorial bearings in stained glass.

Colne

COLNE, a market-town and parochial chapelry, in the parish of Whalley, union of Burnley, Higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 35 miles (S. E.) from Lancaster, and 217 (N. N. W.) from London; containing 20,761 inhabitants, of whom 8615 are in the township of Colne. This place is supposed by the geographer of Ravennas to have been a Roman station, the site of which is referred by Whitaker, the historian of Manchester, to Caster Cliff, a lofty eminence about a mile south of the town, where are still the vestiges of a quadrilateral camp, 120 yards in length, and 110 in breadth, surrounded by a double vallum and fosse. The camp is considered by Dr. Whitaker, the historian of the parish of Whalley, only as the castra æstiva of the primary station, which, perhaps on better authority, he places in the low grounds beneath the town and near the bank of the Colne water, but of which every vestige has been obliterated by cultivation. Numerous Roman coins have been found at various times, and among them several of Gordianus and other emperors, inclosed in a large silver cup turned up by the plough in 1696.

The town seems to have arisen with Lancaster, Manchester, and other places in the county, soon after its conquest by Agricola, in the year 79, and derives its name either from Colunio, the supposed name of the Roman station, or from the Saxon Culme, coal, with which the neighbourhood abounds. It is situated on an elevated point of land between the river Calder and the Leeds and Liverpool canal; the streets are paved, and the inhabitants are amply supplied with water. A subscription library was established in 1793. The woollenmanufacture was carried on here previously to the arrival of the Flemings in England in the time of Edward III., as appears from the rent-roll of the last Henry de Lacy, lord of the manor in 1311, in which a fulling-mill is returned as being valued at 6s. 8d. per annum; and the manufacture of shalloons, calimancoes, and tammies, was also extensively carried on. A Piece-hall was erected in 1775, a substantial stone building, for many years the principal mart in the district for woollen and worsted goods, but now appropriated to the sale of general merchandise at the fairs only. The cotton-manufacture is at present the principal branch of business; the chief articles are calico and mouselin de lain for the Manchester market, both of them being made to a considerable extent. The Leeds and Liverpool canal passes through a tunnel a mile in length, at a small distance from the town, affording a facility of conveyance for the coal, freestone, slate, and lime, with which the neighbouring hills abound, and for the produce of the factories; and the East Lancashire railway and the Bradford Extension both terminate at this place, in a common station. The market days are Wednesday and Saturday; on the last Wednesday in every month is a market for cattle, and the fairs are March 7th, May 13th, for cattle, and 15th for pedlery, October 11th, and December 21st. The town is within the jurisdiction of the county magistrates: the powers of the county debt-court of Colne, established in 1847, extend over the sub-registration-districts of Colne and Pendle.

The chapelry includes the townships of Barrowford, Foulridge, Great and Little Marsden, and Trawden, and comprises by computation 23,040 acres, chiefly pasture and meadow land: of this area, 4526 acres are in the township of Colne. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £179, with a good glebe-house; patrons, Hulme's Trustees. The chapel, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, is a very ancient structure, erected probably soon after the Conquest, and in the reign of Henry I. given to the priory of Pontefract by Hugh de Val. It was repaired, or partly rebuilt, in the reign of Henry VIII., when the only remains preserved of the original edifice were the finely-carved screen at the entrance and on the sides of the choir, and three massive circular columns in the north aisle, one of which, having been undermined by some interments, suddenly gave way in 1815, and endangered the whole building, which has since been rendered firm and secure. There is a church or chapel at Little Marsden; and since 1835 four additional churches have been erected in this chapelry, viz.: Christ Church, Colne, built in 1836; St. Thomas', Barrowford, in 1838; St. Mary's, Trawden, in 1844; and St. John's, Great Marsden, in 1847. A district has been assigned to each of the five churches, and the benefice of each augmented by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to £150. The livings of Little Marsden, Christ Church, and Barrowford, are in the gift of Hulme's Trustees, and those of Trawden and Great Marsden in that of the Crown and the Bishop of Chester, alternately. In the same period five national schools have been built, capable of accommodating 1700 children. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists. The grammar school, of very uncertain foundation, is endowed with about £15 per annum, for which six boys are taught free, four of them by means of a bequest of £40 from Thomas Blakey in 1687; the old schoolroom was taken down, and on its site a new one erected by subscription, in 1812. There is a tradition that Dr. Tillotson, Archbishop of Canterbury, received the rudiments of his education at the school. A school was founded, and endowed with £16 per annum, in 1746, at Laneshaw Bridge, by John Emmot, Esq.

Colne, Earl's (St. Andrew)

COLNE, EARL'S (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Halstead, Witham division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 3½ miles (E. S. E.) from Halstead; containing 1385 inhabitants. This parish takes the prefix to its name from the family of De Vere, earls of Oxford, to whom it belonged at the time of the Domesday survey; and its name, in common with others in the district, from the river Colne, over which is a bridge on the line of the Roman road from Colchester. It is about ten miles in circumference, and consists chiefly of elevated ground; the soil is a kind of loam, partially mixed with sand, and, though not of great tenacity, tolerably fertile. A fair is held on March 25th. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £8. 10. 10.; patron, and impropriator of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, H. H. Carwardine, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £242. 14. 9., and the vicarial for £670. The church is a handsome ancient edifice, with a massive tower partly of flint, and is ornamented with several monuments of the De Veres, which were removed from the church of a Benedictine priory founded here in the eleventh century by Aubrey de Vere, who became one of the monks: the priory was dedicated to St. Mary and St. John the Evangelist, and was made a cell to the abbey of Abingdon, in Berkshire; at the Dissolution it had a prior and ten monks, with a revenue of £175. 14. 8. There are places of worship for Particular Baptists and the Society of Friends. Certain land was bequeathed by the Rev. Christopher Swallow, who died in 1539, for the support of a grammar school; the proceeds amount to £188 per annum. Thomas Audley, lord chancellor of England in the reign of Henry VIII., was born in the parish.

Colne, Engain (St. Andrew)

COLNE, ENGAIN (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, Witham division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 2¾ miles (E.) from Halstead; containing 685 inhabitants. This parish, which derives the affix to its name from the family of Engain, proprietors of the manor, comprises 2444a. 2r. 5p., whereof about 1896 are arable, 297 pasture, 15 in hops, and 148 wood and plantations. The lands are in general elevated, and the soil is of light quality, consisting of loam, mixed with sand. The river Colne forms the southern boundary, near which passes the Roman road from Colchester. A fair for toys is held on Whit Monday and Tuesday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 17. 6., and in the gift of the Governors of Christ's Hospital: the tithes have been commuted for £750, and the glebe comprises 56 acres, with a house. The church, a plain edifice with a good tower of brick, is pleasantly situated; the parsonage-house is a handsome residence.

Colne, Wakes (All Saints)

COLNE, WAKES (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, Witham division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 5½ miles (E. by S.) from Halstead; containing 444 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Colchester to Halstead, derives its distinguishing epithet from one of its former proprietors. It is about eight miles in circumference, and consists generally of low land; the soil is loam of various kinds, intermixed with clay. The Roman road from Colchester passes through the parish, to the south of which flows the river Colne. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 0. 5., and in the patronage of the Earl of Verulam: the tithes have been commuted for £574, and the glebe contains 18½ acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a plain edifice, with a steeple of wood.

Colne, White (All Saints)

COLNE, WHITE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Halstead, Witham division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 4 miles (E.) from Halstead; containing 419 inhabitants. It comprises 1467a. 2r. 33p., chiefly arable, and is bounded on the south by the river Colne; the lands are generally elevated, and the soil of light quality. The living is a perpetual curacy, or donative; patrons and impropriators, the family of Hume: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £345, and the perpetual curate's for £135; the glebe comprises a quarter of an acre. The church, by the name of Colne mi Blanc, was assigned by Aubrey de Vere, founder of Colne Priory, and confirmed by Aubrey, his son, to the monks at Colne: after the Dissolution it was given to John, Earl of Oxford, and became a donative or curacy. It is an ancient building, with a square embattled tower formerly surmounted by a spire. The Roman road from Colchester passes on the south of the parish.

Colney (St. Andrew)

COLNEY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Henstead, hundred of Humbleyard, E. division of Norfolk, 2¾ miles (W. by S.) from Norwich; containing 110 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the north-east by the river Yare, and intersected by the road from Norwich to Hingham, comprises about 900 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and in the gift of J. Scott, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £219, and the glebe contains 38 acres. The church, a small edifice with a circular tower, has been repewed; the font is richly sculptured.

Colney (St. Peter).—See London-Colney.

COLNEY (St. Peter).—See London-Colney.

Colney-Hatch

COLNEY-HATCH, a hamlet, in the parish of Fryern-Barnet, union of Barnet, Finsbury division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex; containing 216 inhabitants. This village lies a little to the east of the great north road; it contains some handsome houses, and the environs abound with pleasing scenery.

Colsterworth (St. John the Baptist)

COLSTERWORTH (St. John the Baptist), a parish, partly in the wapentake of Beltisloe, and partly in that of Winnibriggs and Threo, union of Grantham, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 8 miles (S.) from Grantham; containing, with the hamlets of Twyford and Woolsthorpe, 1017 inhabitants. The village is situated in a beautiful valley, through which winds the river Witham, and is remarkable for the salubrity of the air. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 10.; net income, £585; patron, H. Mirehouse, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and cornrents in 1805. The church is a small structure of early English architecture, with a good tower in the later style, and contains a gallery erected at the expense of Sir Isaac Newton, who was born at Woolsthorpe on Christmasday, 1642. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The Roman road called High Dyke, passes through the parish.

Colston-Basset (St. Mary)

COLSTON-BASSET (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bingham, S. division of the wapentake of Bingham and of the county of Nottingham, 10 miles (S. E. by E.) from Nottingham; containing 403 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Nottingham to Waltham, and comprises about 2500 acres, the soil of which is chiefly a strong clay; the river Smite and the Grantham Canal pass within half a mile. Limestone is quarried, and sent, when burnt, in considerable quantities to the surrounding districts. The ancient cross in the village was rebuilt in 1831, to commemorate the coronation of William IV. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 7. 6., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £270; impropriator, H. Martin, Esq. The glebe contains about 44 acres, and a good house has been built by the incumbent. The church is an ancient and beautiful cruciform structure in the later English style, standing on a hill at a short distance from the village; it contains a remarkably handsome screen of oak. There are places of worship for Roman Catholics and Methodists.

Coltishall (St. John the Baptist)

COLTISHALL (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of South Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Norwich; containing 897 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1129a. 29p., whereof about 1065 acres are arable, 30 pasture, and 34 woodland. It is situated on the river Bure, and the road from Norwich to North Walsham runs through the village, the west side of which is in the parish of Great Hautbois. Here is a brewery; and a considerable trade is carried on in malt, corn, coal, and timber, for which the river affords facility of conveyance. A fair for pedlery is held on Whit-Monday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 2. 6., and in the patronage of King's College, Cambridge: the tithes of this parish, with those upon certain lands in South Ruston and Scottow, have been commuted for £340, and the glebe contains about 27 acres. The church, chiefly in the early style, has a lofty embattled tower: the nave is separated from the chancel by a carved screen; the font is Norman, and the building contains several neat memorials. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. John Chapman, in 1718, bequeathed £10 per annum and a house, to which in 1815 the Rev. Dr. Grape added £360 three per cent. consols., making the income £20. 16., for teaching boys.



<--Previous:
Cold-Ashby - Coley