Comberton - Compton-Dando

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

672-675

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'Comberton - Compton-Dando', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 672-675. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50892 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Comberton (St. Mary)

COMBERTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Wetherley, county of Cambridge, 5¾ miles (W. S. W.) from Cambridge; containing 520 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1925 acres, of which 197 are or were common and waste. An act for inclosing lands was passed in 1839. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 11½., and in the patronage of Jesus College, Cambridge: the appropriate tithes, belonging to the Bishop of Ely, have been commuted for £328. 15., and the vicarial for £104; the appropriate glebe consists of 186 acres, and the vicarial contains nearly 6 acres.

Comberton, Great (St. Michael)

COMBERTON, GREAT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union, and Upper division of the hundred, of Pershore, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2¾ miles (S. by E.) from Pershore; containing 215 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the river Avon, comprises about 940 acres; onethird is pasture, and the produce of the remainder beans, barley, and apples. There are quarries of oolite, in which are imbedded various fossils, and which is used for common purposes; a blue clay is also found. The village is seated on the north side of Bredon hill, and overlooks a beautiful and extensive landscape. A quay has been constructed. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £254; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Charles Hubert Parker. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1818. The church is an ancient structure, apparently built at different periods; it was repaired in 1836.

Comberton, Little (St. Peter)

COMBERTON, LITTLE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union, and Upper division of the hundred, of Pershore, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Pershore; containing 229 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 758 acres, of a fertile soil, producing wheat and other grain: there is abundance of gravel, which is dug for the roads, and in the beds are found numerous fossil shells and other remains. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 0. 2½.; net income, £258; patron and incumbent, the Rev. William Parker. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1803. The church stands on the north side of the village; it is an ancient structure, lately repaired.

Comb-Pyne

COMB-PYNE, a parish, in the union and hundred of Axminster, Honiton and S. divisions of Devon, 3¾ miles (E. S. E.) from Colyton; containing 143 inhabitants. This place was anciently called Comb-Coffin, from the Coffin family; its present adjunct is derived from the Pynes, its later possessors. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 11. 8., and in the gift of Messrs. Knight, Cuff, and Edwards: the tithes have been commuted for £115, and there is a glebe of 28 acres.

Comb-Rawleigh (St. Nicholas)

COMB-RAWLEIGH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Honiton, hundred of Axminster, Honiton and S. divisions of Devon, 1½ mile (N. N. W.) from Honiton; containing 276 inhabitants. This parish, which is separated from that of Honiton by the river Otter, comprises 1740a. 3r. 2p., and is intersected by the old road to Taunton. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 0. 10., and in the gift of E. Simeon Drewe, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £300, and the glebe comprises 40 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, and contains a monument to the memory of John Sheldon, Esq., F.R.S., and anatomical professor, who died in 1808.

Combrook

COMBROOK, a chapelry, in the parish of Kington, union of Stratford-upon-Avon, Kington division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 2¼ miles (W. by N.) from Kington; containing 282 inhabitants, and comprising 1137 acres. The tithes were commuted for land in 1772. The chapel, dedicated to St. Margaret, has been rebuilt. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school, endowed by a late Lord Willoughby with £5 per annum, is further supported by Lord Willoughby de Broke. In 1763, Lady Tryphena Verney, agreeably to a bequest of £300 by her husband, George Verney, Esq., conveyed an estate for the maintenance of two scholars at Trinity College, Cambridge, to be chosen from this school, or, in default, out of the grammar school at Warwick.

Combs (St. Mary)

COMBS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Stow, W. division of Suffolk, 1¼ mile (S. by E.) from Stow-Market; containing 1064 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Bury St. Edmund's to Ipswich, and on the river Orwell, which forms its north-eastern boundary, and is navigable from Ipswich to Stow-Market. It comprises by measurement 2770 acres. The soil is generally a strong clay, but near the river light, and inclined to moor; the surface is very uneven, rising into hills of considerable elevation; the lower grounds afford excellent pasture. A large tannery has been established for more than 150 years. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 17. 8½., and in the gift of the Earl of Ashburnham, with a net income of £511: the glebe comprises 30 acres, and a handsome rectory-house has been built by the Rev. Richard Daniel. The church is in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower; the windows retain some fine portions of ancient stained glass. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Common-Dale

COMMON-DALE, a township, in the parish and union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 6½ miles (S. E.) from Guisborough; containing 79 inhabitants. The name of this place is corrupted from Colman-dale, so called from Colman, Bishop of Lindisfarne, who had a hermitage here. It was given to the priory of Guisborough by the founder, and continued with that establishment until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Chaloner family, by whom the lands were afterwards divided and sold. The township is in the district called Cleveland, occupying the south part of the parish, and comprising a narrow secluded vale, surrounded by high and heathy moors; it contains by computation 2630 acres of land, mostly the property of Viscount Downe. In the township is the hamlet of Skelderskew-Grange, which belonged to the priory of Basedale, and which probably derives its name from skell, a rivulet, and skew, wood-ground standing on a hill; terms precisely descriptive of the position of the hamlet.

Compstall

COMPSTALL, a village, in the parish and union of Stockport, hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 5 miles (E.) from Stockport. It lies on the west bank of the Etherow, which here separates the county from Derbyshire, and over which is a bridge from the village. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in spinning, power-loom weaving, bleaching, and printing, and the remainder principally at extensive coal-works in the neighbourhood. Forty years since, Compstall consisted of only a few straggling cottages, but since the establishment of the cotton-manufacture, it has been gradually rising to its present thriving condition. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Compton (St. Nicholas)

COMPTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wantage, hundred of Compton, county of Berks, 2¼ miles (E. S. E.) from East Ilsley; containing 544 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 3600 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 14. 4½.; net income, £330; patron, John Thomas Wasey, Esq.; impropriators, the Rev. James Best, and Messrs. Palmer.

Compton

COMPTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Ashbourn, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, though locally in the hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, ½ a mile (S. E.) from Ashbourn. This place forms a suburb of the town of Ashbourn, from which it is separated by a small brook called the Schoo. Sion Chapel, with six almshouses attached to it, under the direction of the trustees of the Countess of Huntingdon's College, was built here by John Cooper, who, by deed in 1801, endowed them with £4500 three per cent. reduced annuities, yielding a dividend of about £130 per annum. The premises were repaired in 1824.

Compton

COMPTON, a tything, in the parish and union of Newent, hundred of Botloe, W. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 504 inhabitants.

Compton

COMPTON, a tything, in the parish of Henbury, union of Clifton, Upper division of the hundred of Henbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 144 inhabitants.

Compton (All Saints)

COMPTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Winchester, hundred of Buddlesgate, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2 miles (S. S. W.) from Winchester; containing 304 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 2099 acres; and the Itchen navigation, the London and Southampton road, and the London and South-Western railway, pass through it. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23. 6. 8.; net income, £329; patron, the Bishop of Winchester. The church, which is small, has portions in various styles, the Norman predominating; and contains a handsome monument, by Westmacott, to Dr. Huntingford, Bishop of Hereford, and Warden of Winchester College.

Compton

COMPTON, a liberty, in the parish of Tettenhall Regis, union of Seisdon, N. division of the hundred of Seisdon, S. division of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (W.) from Wolverhampton; containing 641 inhabitants. Here is a neat village, adjoining the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal, and near Tettenhall-Wood, where a considerable quantity of sand is obtained for the use of the iron-founders, and for mixing with mortar. Several handsome houses and a great number of cottages have been built at Tettenhall-Wood since its inclosure in 1809; the cottages are mostly occupied by lock-makers. There is a small dissenting meeting-house.

Compton (St. Nicholas)

COMPTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Guildford, First division of the hundred of Godalming, W. division of Surrey, 3½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Guildford; containing 522 inhabitants. It comprises 1971 acres, of which 77 are common or waste, and extends to the top of the chalk hill reaching from Guildford to Farnham; the soil is chalk, sand, and a little clay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 4. 9½.; patron and impropriator, the Rev. George M. Molyneux: the tithes have been commuted for £421. 15., and the glebe contains nearly 72 acres, with a glebe-house. The church has a low tower and spire, and contains a curious chancel, with a groined roof, and a chapel over it; these portions are in the early English style, but there are others of decorated character. Dr. Edward Fulham, who attended Charles II. during his exile, and was the first canon of Windsor appointed after the Restoration, was born here in 1604.

Compton (St. Mary)

COMPTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Westbourne, hundred of Westbourne and Singleton, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 10 miles (N. W.) from Chichester; containing 274 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the west by the county of Southampton, and the village is situated on one of the roads from Petersfield to Chichester. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a small portion of the rectorial tithes, with the living of Up-Marden annexed, and valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; patron, and impropriator of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, M. R. Langdale, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £130, and the vicarial for £131; the glebe comprises 4 acres. The church is in the early and decorated English styles, and contains some neat monuments to the families of Peckham and Phipps. Edward Flower, in 1521, founded a free grammar school, with an endowment of £100 to be laid out in land; Thomas Pelham gave £80, with a rent-charge of £20, and in 1528, William Spicer conveyed lands in furtherance of the charity, the total income of which amounts to £28.

Compton

COMPTON, a tything, in the parish of Enford, union of Pewsey, hundred of Elstub and Everley, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of Wilts; containing 73 inhabitants.

Compton-Abbas, or West Compton (St. Michael)

COMPTON-ABBAS, or West Compton (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of Cerne, Totcombe, and Modbury, Dorchester division of Dorset, 9 miles (W. N. W.) from Dorchester; containing 91 inhabitants. It derives the adjunct to its name from having once formed part of the possessions of Milton Abbey. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 0. 5.; net income, £191; patron, R. Williams, Esq.

Compton-Abbas (St. Mary)

COMPTON-ABBAS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Shaftesbury, hundred of Sixpenny-Handley, Shaston division of Dorset, 3½ miles (S. by E.) from Shaftesbury; containing 439 inhabitants. This parish, which derives its name from the situation of the village in a combe or vale, and its adjunct from its annexation to Shaston Abbey, lies on the road from Shaftesbury to Blandford-Forum, and comprises 1384 acres, whereof 318 are common or waste. There are some quarries of green sandstone used for building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 16. 2½., and in the gift of Sir R. P. Glyn, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £350. The church is a small ancient edifice, with a tower, on the summit of which is a pear-tree in full vigour.

Compton-Abdale (St. Oswald)

COMPTON-ABDALE (St. Oswald), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Northleach; containing 260 inhabitants. The river Coln runs through the parish, which is well wooded. The living is a perpetual curacy, net income, £78; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Bristol. The church is a small ancient building.

Compton-Basset (St. Swithin)

COMPTON-BASSET (St. Swithin), a parish, in the union and hundred of Calne, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts, 2¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Calne; containing 498 inhabitants. It comprises by estimation 2236 acres: the surface is pleasingly varied with hill and dale; the soil on the hills is chalky, but in the vale a rich clay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 10½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Salisbury: the tithes have been commuted for £572. 16. 6., out of which £12 are paid to the vicar of Calne; the glebe comprises 45 acres, with a glebe-house.

Compton-Beauchamp (St. Swithin)

COMPTON-BEAUCHAMP (St. Swithin), a parish, in the union of Farringdon, hundred of Shrivenham, county of Berks, 6½ miles (S. by W.) from Farringdon; containing, with the hamlet of Knighton, 157 inhabitants. It is intersected by the Great Western railway, and situated near the Wilts and Berks canal, which passes along its northern border. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 18. 9., and in the patronage of the Earl of Craven: the tithes have been commuted for £338, and the glebe comprises 22½ acres, with a glebe-house. Here is an extensive doubletrenched encampment, thought to be Roman, from the coins discovered upon the spot, near which passes the Ikeneld road.

Compton-Bishop (St. Andrew)

COMPTON-BISHOP (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, 2¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Axbridge; containing 802 inhabitants. It is intersected by the Bristol and Exeter road and the river Axe, and comprises 2535a. 2r. 30p., of which 775 acres are common or waste, and 50 road and water: there is a good supply of excellent limestone in the hills. The village is situated in a hollow, under the southern declivity of the Mendip range, presenting a very picturesque appearance: the village of Cross, in the parish, has a General Post-Office. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11; patron, the Prebendary of Compton-Bishop in the Cathedral of Wells: the great tithes have been commuted for £71. 2., and the vicarial for £203. 17.; the rectorial glebe contains 82½ acres, and the vicar's nearly 7 acres, with a glebe-house. The church has a handsome stone pulpit, and the exterior arch of the porch is in the Norman style: in the churchyard is an ancient cross. A little to the south-west of Compton is a spacious natural cave, entered by a perpendicular shaft; and proceeding by a difficult winding passage, a still more extensive cavern opens to the sight: from the roof, which expands into a kind of arch, hung formerly some beautiful stalactites; and various incrustations, assuming the most fantastic shapes, lay scattered about; but all have been defaced or removed by visiters.

Compton-Chamberlain (St. Michael)

COMPTON-CHAMBERLAIN (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Wilton, S. division of the hundred of Damerham, S. division of Wilts, 8 miles (W.) from Salisbury; containing 350 inhabitants. It abounds with green sandstone, used for building. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13; net income, £99; patron and impropriator, J. H. Penruddock, Esq.: the rector is entitled to a rent-charge of £67. 12. out of the tithes of the parish of Tisbury. The church is an ancient cruciform structure, in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower on the south side, forming in the lower part a porch. Colonel Penruddock, who was executed at Exeter, in 1655, for an attempt to restore Charles II. to the throne, resided in the parish.

Compton-Dando (St. Mary)

COMPTON-DANDO (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Keepesham, E. division of Somerset, 2 miles (E. by N.) from Pensford; containing, with part of Woolard hamlet, 359 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Chew, and comprises 1845 acres, of which 25 are common or waste: there are some quarries of stone, but of a quality fit only for the roughest buildings and for the roads. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 10. 5.; net income, £180; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Bath and Wells: the glebe comprises 50 acres, with a house. The church is a handsome structure in the decorated and later English styles, with a square embattled tower; at the north-east angle of the building is an enriched buttress, the lowest portion of which is formed of the remains of a Roman altar, displaying in one of its faces a statue of Hercules Pacificator, and in the other, one of Apollo. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A cold spring here is slightly impregnated with iron. The Wansdyke traverses the parish in a northwest direction.