Croyland - Cudworth

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

742-746

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'Croyland - Cudworth', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 742-746. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50909 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Croyland.—See Crowland.

CROYLAND.—See Crowland.

Cruckton

CRUCKTON, a township, in the parish of Pontesbury, union of Atcham, hundred of Ford, county of Salop, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Shrewsbury; containing 155 inhabitants. A church dedicated to St. Thomas, being a chapel of ease to the second portion of the rectory of Pontesbury, was built by subscription in 1840, at an expense of £900; it is in the early English style, and contains 280 sittings, of which 160 are free.

Crudwell (All Saints)

CRUDWELL (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Malmesbury, Malmesbury and Kingswood, and N. divisions of Wilts, 6 miles (E.) from Tetbury; containing, with the hamlets of Chedglow, Chelworth, Eastcourt, and Murcott, 681 inhabitants. It comprises 4782a. 2r. 3p., of which about 2266 acres are arable, 2314 pasture, and 128 wood. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 5. 2½.; net income, £487; patron, the Rev. W. Maskelyne. The church is a large and handsome edifice, in the Norman style; on one side of the nave the columns are short and massive, and on the other lofty and light. A school is endowed with land worth £18 per annum. Near this place runs the old Fosse-way to Cirencester.

Crumpsall

CRUMPSALL, a township, in the parish and union of Manchester, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 2½ miles (N. by W.) from Manchester, on the road to Bury; containing 2745 inhabitants. It comprises 826 acres, nearly the whole of which is pasture land, occupied chiefly by farmers who supply the town of Manchester with milk and other dairy produce. The surface is undulated; and being highly favourable for the erection of villas, cottages ornées, &c., many have been built by the merchants and shop-keepers of Manchester, in pleasant situations. The river Irk, a tributary to the Irwell, bounds the township; and several considerable works have been established on its banks. There are, a spinning and weaving mill, built in 1832, and enlarged in 1845, the property of John Brooks, Esq., and occupied by Messrs. Simpson, Thompson, and Company, having 170-horse steam-power, and employing 900 hands; a calico-printing establishment, carried on by Thomas Fielden, Esq.; and some Turkey-red dye-works, the property of, and conducted by, Messrs. Louis and Michael Delaunay, whose father, a native of France, commenced the first dye-works for that colour in the neighbourhood. Crumpsall Hall was the residence of the ancestors of the ducal family of Howard.

The "village" comprehends portions of the townships of Crumpsall, Cheetham, and Broughton, and is commonly known by the name of Cheetham-Hill; it contains two inns, and as many as twelve beer-houses. The tithes of the township belong to the Dean and Canons of Manchester, and amount to £90 per annum. The Wesleyans have a large and handsome meetinghouse, with a commodious day and Sunday school; and the Methodists two places of worship. In 1785 three cottages were built, out of the rent of which the sum of £13 is paid in support of St. Mark's school, in Cheetham. Humphrey Cheetham or Chetham, the founder of the Blue-coat hospital in Manchester, was born here in 1580: five of the boys are eligible from this place. The township can boast of another benefactor in George Clarke, who bequeathed to the poor the rents of three farms within it, to be distributed yearly in clothing, bedding, &c. The trustees of this charity some years ago obtained an act to enable them to sell the land for building on, which greatly increased the income of the estate, now about £2000 per annum; the cost of the farms having been £300 only, at the time of Mr. Clarke's purchase of them. The distribution of the proceeds is made every winter by the boroughreeve of Manchester, under the title of the Boroughreeve's Charity.—See Cheetham.

Crundale (St. Mary)

CRUNDALE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of East Ashford, hundred of Wye, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 9 miles (S. W. by S.) from Canterbury; containing 278 inhabitants. It is partly bounded by the river Stour on the west, and comprises 1572a. 36p., of which about 980 acres are arable, 180 pasture, 250 wood, and 150 rough down. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 10. 10., and in the gift of Sir Edmund Filmer, Bart.: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £371. 9. 6., and a rentcharge of £23. 10. is paid to an impropriator; the glebe consists of about 18 acres, with a glebe-house. At Crundale Green, considerable remains of a Roman sepulchre were discovered in 1703, with several skeletons, urns, and other vessels, both of earthenware and glass.

Crutch

CRUTCH, an extra-parochial district, in the Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Droitwich and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2 miles (N.) from Droitwich; containing 9 inhabitants, and comprising 240 acres. It lies to the east of the road from Droitwich to Kidderminster.

Cruwys-Morchard (Holy Cross)

CRUWYS-MORCHARD (Holy Cross), a parish, in the union of Tiverton, hundred of Witheridge, Cullompton and N. divisions of Devon, 5¼ miles (W.) from Tiverton; containing 670 inhabitants. This place takes its name from the ancient family of Cruwys, whose seat, Morchard House, near the church, was originally built in 1199, and is now inhabited by their descendant, the Rev. G. S. Cruwys. The parish is situated on the new road from Tiverton to Barnstaple, and comprises by computation nearly 6000 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 11. 8.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. G. S. Cruwys, whose tithes have been commuted for £524, and whose glebe comprises 150 acres, with a glebe-house. The church was in 1689 struck by lightning, which rent the steeple and melted the bells; it contains a finely-carved oak screen, and some ancient monuments to the Anerays, and one to the memory of the Rev. Edmund Granger. In the churchyard is the burial-ground of the Cruwys family, the area of which is bounded by fir-trees, marking out the site of the old family chapel, destroyed by Cromwell's soldiers: large pieces of alabaster, being fragments of broken monuments, have been dug up on the spot.

Crux-Easton (St. Michael)

CRUX-EASTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Kingsclere, hundred of Pastrow, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 7 miles (S. S. W.) from Newbury; containing 102 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 994 acres, of which 696 are arable, and about 200 woodland: the road from Andover to Newbury passes through the village. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 12. 6.; net income, £180; patron, the Rev. James Bagge: there is a glebe-house, with about 23 acres of land. The church was repaired about a century since by casing the old walls. There is a chapel of ease, called New Chapel; and a school is supported by the Earl of Carnarvon. In the neighbourhood are remains of several encampments. Here was the celebrated grotto constructed by the nine daughters of Edward Lisle, Esq., and commemorated by Pope; it has been suffered to go to ruin, the shell only remaining.

Cubberley (St. Giles)

CUBBERLEY (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Cheltenham, partly in the hundred of Bradley, but chiefly in that of Rapsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4½ miles (S. by E.) from Cheltenham; containing 231 inhabitants. This place during the parliamentary war afforded an asylum for one night to Charles II., who, travelling in disguise after the battle of Worcester, slept at the parsonage-house the evening before he effected his escape. The parish is situated within a quarter of a mile of the new road from Cheltenham to Cirencester, and comprises by measurement 3421 acres: stone of inferior quality is quarried. The principal source of the river Thames, called the Seven Springs, is in the parish: the stream turns a mill within half a mile from the spot whence it issues. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of Henry Elwes, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £470, and the glebe comprises 17½ acres, with a glebe-house. The church, said to have been rebuilt in 1330, by Sir Thomas de Berkeley, is a handsome structure in the decorated English style, and contains several ancient and interesting monuments: the statue of Sir Thomas is still remaining in a niche in the south aisle; against the north wall, under a recess, is the figure of a knight in bold relief; and there are also the effigies of a crusader, and of a lady in the dress of the fourteenth century. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Cubbington (St. Mary)

CUBBINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Warwick, Kenilworth division of the hundred of Knightlow, S. division of the county of Warwick, 5 miles (N. E. by E.) from Warwick; containing 830 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south, and partly on the east, by the river Leame, is intersected by the road from Warwick to Rugby, and comprises 1858 acres of rich and productive land. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 8.; net income, £207; patron and impropriator, Lord Leigh. The church has been enlarged. A national school was established in 1821; and a bequest by John Glover, in 1762, of £250 for educating children, and one by Hannah Murcott, in 1775, of £100 for the establishment of a school, are applied towards its support.

Cubert (St. Cuthbert)

CUBERT (St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of St. Columb Major, W. division of the hundred of Pyder and of the county of Cornwall, 10 miles (N. E.) from Truro; containing 368 inhabitants. It is situated on the shore of the Bristol Channel, and comprises by admeasurement 2440 acres, of which a portion is common or waste: along the coast are several curious caverns, and a very large sand-bank between 200 and 300 feet high; and there is a well, called Holy Well, on the beach, much resorted to for children diseased or weak in their limbs. A small cattle-fair is held on the 3rd of June. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Rev. T. Stabback: the tithes have been commuted for £178, and the glebe consists of 20 acres, with a glebe-house. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The remains of two encampments, supposed to be Danish, may be traced.

Cubley (St. Andrew)

CUBLEY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Uttoxeter, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Ashbourn; containing 425 inhabitants. It comprises 2227 acres of land, mostly of a strong soil, with some gravelly loam; and has two pleasant villages, one north of the church, called Big Cubley, the other on an eminence west of the church, named Little Cubley. This was the chief seat of the Montgomery family, and for a time the seat of the Stanhopes; but the mansion was long since pulled down. A fair, held on November 30th, was long noted for fat hogs. The living is a rectory, with that of Marston-Montgomery annexed, valued in the king's books at £13. 16. 3., and in the gift of the Earl of Chesterfield: the tithes have been commuted for £380, and the glebe comprises 5¼ acres, and a glebe-house. The church is an ancient structure with a fine tower; in the chancel, which was repaired in 1845, is the figure of a Knight Templar: the edifice is seen to good effect on the road from Sudbury to Ashbourn.

Cublington (St. Nicholas)

CUBLINGTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Aylesbury, hundred of Cottlesloe, county of Buckingham, 6¾ miles (N. by E.) from Aylesbury; containing 290 inhabitants. It comprises 1200 acres, chiefly pasture land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 16. 3.; net income, £289; patrons, the Rector and Fellows of Lincoln College, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, in 1769.

Cuby (St. Keby)

CUBY (St. Keby), a parish, in the union of Truro, W. division of the hundred of Powder and of the county of Cornwall; adjoining the town of Tregoney, and containing 161 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from St. Austell to St. Mawes, and is bounded by the river Fal; it comprises 2000 acres, all arable, except about 8 acres of coppice. The living is a vicarage, annexed to the rectory of Tregony cum St. James, valued together in the king's books at £10. 4. 2. The church, with the exception of the porch and tower, was rebuilt in 1828; the interior is exceedingly neat, and contains a font curiously sculptured.

Cuckfield (Holy Trinity)

CUCKFIELD (Holy Trinity), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Buttinghill, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 25 miles (N. E. by E.) from Chichester, and 38 (S.) from London, on the road to Brighton; containing 3444 inhabitants. This place is situated on a pleasant eminence, nearly in the centre of the county. The pathways in the town are laid with bricks of a very firm and durable quality, formed of red clay, which is found within the distance of four miles, as are strata of pipe-clay of peculiar whiteness: sandstone also is found in the parish. The London and Brighton railway, after being carried across the valley of the Ouse by a stately viaduct of 37 arches, passes within a mile and a half of the town, and for its further progress a bridge and embankments have been constructed at Vale Pool. The market is on Friday; and fairs are held on Whit-Thursday and Sept. 16th, for horses and cattle. The county magistrates hold petty-sessions for the division on alternate Mondays; and the town is a polling-place for the eastern division of the county: the powers of the county debtcourt of Cuckfield, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Cuckfield, and the parish of Wivelsfield. Cuckfield Place is an ancient mansion, erected in the latter part of the sixteenth century. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £20. 14. 2.; net income, £414; patron, the Bishop of Chichester; impropriators, the landowners. The church is a large and handsome structure in the decorated English style, with a tower surmounted by a spire covered with shingles, which, from its elevated situation, has been frequently injured by lightning. There are places of worship for Independents and Unitarians. The free grammar school was founded in 1528, and endowed by Edward Fuller, of London, and the Rev. William Spencer, of Balcomb, with the manor of Redstone, in the parish of Reigate, and other property; the income is £28 per annum. Lady Dorothy Shirley erected the school-house, which adjoins the churchyard; also a gallery in the church for the scholars. The poor law union of Cuckfield comprises 15 parishes or places, and contains a population of 17,132.

Cucklington (St. Lawrence)

CUCKLINGTON (St. Lawrence), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Wincanton hundred of Norton-Ferris, E. division of Somerset, 2¾ miles (E. by S.) from Wincanton; containing 339 inhabitants. The manor belonged to Henry de Ortiaco or L'Orti, to whom Edward I., in the 32nd of his reign, granted a market on Tuesday, and a fair on the eve, day, and morrow, of the festival of All Saints, and for seven successive days; both of which have been long discontinued. The living is a rectory, with that of Stoke-Trister united, valued in the king's books at £12. 19. 4½., and in the gift of William Phelips, Esq., lord of the manor: the tithes of the two parishes have been commuted for £594. 6., and the glebe comprises 99¼ acres.

Cuckney, or Norton-Cuckney (St. Mary)

CUCKNEY, or Norton-Cuckney (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Worksop, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 5½ miles (S. S. W.) from Worksop; containing 1697 inhabitants, of whom 625 are in the township of Norton-Cuckney. The parish is watered by the river Poulter, and comprises 5284a. 3r. 21p., of good land, all inclosed, and consisting of extensive pastures and some plantations: the township contains 1095 acres. The village is of considerable extent; and some worsted and cotton mills give employment to a large number of children from the Foundling Hospital, London. There is also a mill for polishing marble. A market and a fair were formerly held, but both have been long discontinued. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 8. 6½.; patron, Earl Manvers; impropriators, the Duke of Portland, and others. The great tithes have been commuted for £726. 18., and the vicarial for £212. 5.; the glebe contains 19 acres, with a glebe-house. The church, a large ancient structure, with a handsome tower, was thoroughly repaired and repewed in 1831.

Cucknoe.—See Cogenhoe.

CUCKNOE.—See Cogenhoe.

Cuddesden (All Saints)

CUDDESDEN (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Headington, hundred of Bullington, county of Oxford, 6½ miles (E. S. E.) from Oxford; containing, with the chapelries of Denton and Wheatley, and the hamlet of Chippinghurst, 1483 inhabitants, of whom 305 are in the township of Cuddesden. This place has been for many years distinguished as one of the residences of the bishops of Oxford. According to Wood's Athenæ, a palace was built in 1635, by Bishop Bancroft, at an expense of £3500, exclusively of a large grant of timber from Shotover Forest, by Charles I.; this edifice was burnt down by Colonel Legge, in 1644, from an apprehension that it might be converted into a garrison by the parliamentarians, and was rebuilt in 1679, by Bishop Fell. Extensive repairs and improvements were made in 1846-7, a neat chapel added, and the gardens enlarged. The living consists of a vicarage and rectory, annexed to the bishopric, and valued in the king's books at £17. 0. 5.; the tithes have been commuted for £315, and the glebe contains nearly 30 acres. The church is a spacious and handsome cruciform structure, chiefly Norman, with some later portions; the west entrance is a fine specimen of the Norman style, and the arch under the tower is highly enriched with zigzag mouldings and other details: there are some interesting monuments to Bishop Bancroft (who was interred near the south wall of the chancel) and Bishops Moss and Jackson. At Wheatley is a separate incumbency, in the gift of the Bishop.

Cuddington (St. Nicholas)

CUDDINGTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union and hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 5¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Aylesbury; containing 626 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Teme, by which it is bounded on the north-west; and according to computation comprises 1240 acres, whereof the greater portion is arable, and the remainder excellent pasture-land. Stone of good quality for building is extensively quarried. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Haddenham: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £275, and the vicarial for £180; the impropriate glebe consists of nearly 18 acres, and the vicarial of 14 acres. There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists.

Cuddington

CUDDINGTON, a township, in the parish of Malpas, union of Wrexham, Higher division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 2¼ miles (W. by S.) from Malpas; containing 240 inhabitants. It lies on the south-western border of the county, and comprises 1258 acres, of which the soil is sand and clay. The tithes have been commuted for £163.

Cuddington

CUDDINGTON, a township, in the parish of Weaverham, union of Northwich, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 4¾ miles (W. by S.) from Northwich; containing 253 inhabitants. It comprises 1031 acres, of a sandy soil. The road from Tarporley to Weaverham passes through.

Cuddington (St. Mary)

CUDDINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Epsom, Second division of the hundred of Copthorne and Effingham, W. division of Surrey, ¾ of a mile (N. N. E.) from Ewell; containing 158 inhabitants. This place is noticed in Domesday book under the appellation of Codintone, and anciently gave name to a family supposed to have been a branch of the Wateviles: Sir Simon de Codington was knight of the shire in the reign of Edward III., and the family held the manor till the 16th century. The living, now extinct, was a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 3½.: the tithes are impropriate, and have been commuted for £381. 15. The church has been demolished. The celebrated palace of Nonsuch, built by Henry VIII., was situated in the parish.—See Ewell.

Cudham (St. Peter and St. Paul)

CUDHAM (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Bromley, hundred of Ruxley, lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, W. division of Kent, 7 miles (S. E. by S.) from Bromley; containing 776 inhabitants. The parish comprises 5113 acres, whereof the soil is in general poor, and abounds with large flints; it contains many extensive woods, covering 1089 acres, and the most considerable of which is that called Cudham-Lodge Wood. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 2. 2., and has a net income of £190; the patronage and impropriation belong to the Crown. A grant for a weekly market to be held here, was made by Henry III.

Cudworth (St. Michael)

CUDWORTH (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Chard, hundred of South Petherton, W. division of Somerset, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Ilminster; containing 155 inhabitants. It comprises 436 acres of arable land, 520 pasture, and 98 wood. The prevailing timber is elm and Scottish fir; the surface is rather hilly, and the soil rests upon chalk: limestone is quarried. The Creech and Chard canal passes within two miles. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Bath and Wells; net income, £63: the tithes have been commuted for £200, and the glebe contains 32 acres. The church is in the later English style of architecture.

Cudworth

CUDWORTH, a township, in the parish of Royston, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 4 miles (N. E. by E.) from Barnsley; containing 552 inhabitants. Mention of this place first occurs in the chartularies of Nostal and Bretton, both which monastic establishments possessed lands here; and among the families that have been connected with the spot as landed proprietors, occur those of Stapleton and Jobson, which were of considerable note. Lands, too, here and in some neighbouring manors, were included in the endowment of the Savoy Hospital, founded by Henry VII. The township comprises by computation 1680 acres of land, and contains the villages of Upper and Lower Cudworth. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.