Denby - Denton, West

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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28-32

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'Denby - Denton, West', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 28-32. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50917 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Denby (St. Mary)

DENBY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Belper, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 8 miles (N. N. E.) from Derby; containing 1338 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Derby to Alfreton, and comprises by admeasurement 2200 acres: coal-mines are in operation, and about 100 persons are employed in the manufacture of stone bottles. It is traversed by the Little Eaton railway, in several branches from the smithy-houses, potteries, and other establishments within its limits, to the various works carried on near its northern and western boundaries. A market held by charter of Edward III., dated 1335, has been discontinued about 30 or 40 years. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £100, and in the patronage of William Drury Holden, Esq.: the impropriation belongs to the almshouse at Derby, and produces a rentcharge of £350; the glebe contains 32 acres, of which 5 are in the parish of Heanor. The church has been enlarged, and 160 free sittings provided. The Wesleyans have a place of worship; and a free school, founded by Mrs. Massie in 1635, possesses an endowment of £47. 10. per annum. John Flamsteed, the celebrated mathematician, and astronomer royal, was born here in 1646.

Denby

DENBY, a chapelry, in the parish of Penistone, union of Wortley, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 7¼ miles (W. by N.) from Barnsley; comprising the townships of Denby, Gunthwaite, and Ingbirchworth; and containing 2175 inhabitants, of whom 1690 are in the township of Denby. This township is in two divisions, called Upper and Lower Denby, and is a hilly district including about 2870 acres, of which a portion is common land not in cultivation: it is chiefly occupied by weavers, and at Denby Dale are several manufactories of woollen goods. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Penistone, with a net income of £98. The church has been rebuilt on a larger scale, 450 additional sittings having been obtained, of which 300 are free; the cost was defrayed by subscription, aided by a grant of £300 from the Ripon Diocesan Society, and one of £200 from the Incorporated Society. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists, Wesleyans, and the Society of Friends. An eminence called Castle Hill, is supposed to have been a Roman station.

Denchworth (St. James)

DENCHWORTH (St. James), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wantage, county of Berks, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Wantage; containing 246 inhabitants. It comprises 1018a. 2r. 26p., of which about onethird is arable; the soil is a dark tenacious clay, producing rich pasture, but not favourable for grain: the surface is generally flat. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 10. 10.; net income, £130; patrons and impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of Worcester College, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land in 1801. The church contains portions of the Norman and the decorated and later English styles, and has some ancient monuments of the Hydes and Geerings.

Dendron

DENDRON, a chapelry, in the parish of Aldingham, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, county of Lancaster, 2½ miles (S. S. E.) from Dalton. This place lies west-by-south of the church of Aldingham, and includes Leece, a small township containing a few farmhouses, in one of the most fertile and salubrious parts of Low Furness, where the eminences are gently swelling mounts, and the vales narrow and winding. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Rector of Aldingham. The chapel, erected by Robert Dickenson in 1642, was rebuilt about 70 years ago, at the expense of Thomas Green, Esq., of London. Robert Dickenson, in 1644, also founded a school, with an endowment.

Denerdistan, Suffolk.—See Denston.

DENERDISTAN, Suffolk.—See Denston.

Denford (Holy Trinity)

DENFORD (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Thrapston, hundred of Huxloe, N. division of the county of Northampton, 1½ mile (S.) from Thrapston; containing 326 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the right bank of the river Nene, and on the road through Ringstead to Higham-Ferrers, and comprises by measurement 1721 acres: stone for building and for repairing the roads is quarried to some extent. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Ringstead annexed, valued in the king's books at £8. 10.; net income, £190; patron and impropriator, Thomas Burton, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1765: the glebehouse is a mere labourer's cottage, let for 40s. a year. The church is principally in the early English style, with a tower and spire.

Denge-Marsh

DENGE-MARSH, a member of the town and cinque-port of New Romney, in the parish of Lydd, liberty and union of Romney-Marsh, though locally in the hundred of Langport, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 1½ mile (S. by E.) from Lydd. It is bounded by the English Channel on the south, where stands Dengeness lighthouse, projected by Mr. Allen, of Rye, in the reign of James I.

Dengie (St. James)

DENGIE (St. James), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengie, S. division of Essex, 2½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Southminster; containing 219 inhabitants. This parish consists of 2259 acres, of which 111 are common or waste; it is situated on the sea-coast, and is supposed to have been a landing-place and stronghold of the Danes during their predatory incursions into Britain. At the time of the Norman survey, the lands belonged to Odo, Bishop of Bayeux. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13, and in the patronage of the Rev. O. Brock: the tithes have been commuted for £732, and the glebe consists of 13 acres. There is also a sinecure, called Bacon's portion, valued in the king's books at £4, and in the same patronage. The church is a small plain edifice, with a tiled roof.

Denham (St. Mary)

DENHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Eton, hundred of Burnham, county of Buckingham, 2 miles (N. N. W.) from Uxbridge; containing 1264 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the river Colne, and intersected by the Grand Junction canal, and comprises 3780 acres, of which about 500 are woodland, and 20 common or waste; of the remaining portion twothirds are arable. The soil is partly a reddish loam, and the uplands are gravelly, forming good turnip soil. At Denham Park is an institution for nervous and mental invalids of the upper classes of society, conducted on improved principles, under a committee of gentlemen; the arrangements are on a scale of superior elegance and comfort. The village is neatly built, and a fair for general articles of merchandise is held in it at Michaelmas. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 9. 4½., and in the gift of Benjamin Way, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £965, and the glebe consists of 62 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a handsome edifice, and contains several interesting monuments. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school is supported from a bequest by Sir William Bowyer, who in 1721 gave £30 per annum, and a house.

Denham (St. John the Baptist)

DENHAM (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hoxne, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (E.) from Eye; containing 313 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to that of Hoxne, and valued in the king's books at £5. 0. 10.: impropriator, Sir E. Kerrison, Bart.: the glebe comprises 20 acres. The church, according to an inscription on the east wall, was built by William de Kirkby, prior of Norwich, about the year 1200.

Denham (St. Mary)

DENHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Thingoe, hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 7 miles (E. by S.) from Newmarket; containing 182 inhabitants. This was anciently an extra-parochial district, the property of the Lewkenor family. Sir Edward Lewkenor built a church here, which he endowed with tithes; and the place was consequently erected into a separate parish, comprising about 1300 acres, including a large wood. Denham Hall, the seat of the family, is now a farmhouse. The living is a perpetual curacy; patron and impropriator, S. Farmer, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £275, and the small for £125; the incumbent has 26 acres of glebe. There are some earthworks which have obtained the appellation of Denham Castle.

Denholme

DENHOLME, an ecclesiastical parish, in the parish of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 2 miles (S.) from Cullingworth. It is about two miles in length and the same in breadth, and is situated on the road from Halifax to Keighley, in Craven; in its vicinity was anciently a park well stocked with deer, which has long since been thrown open. The surface is mountainous and high moorland, and what land is reduced to pasturage has been reclaimed from the moors. There are coal-mines, stone-quarries, some copperas-works, a large worsted-mill, and an extensive ale and porter brewery. The village is situated on an eminence, and is chiefly inhabited by persons employed in the mines and manufactures of the surrounding district. The parish was constituted under the act 6 and 7 Victoria, cap. 37, and the church, St. Paul's, was completed in November 1846; it is in the early English style, cost upwards of £4000, and is much admired for the beauty of its architecture: the east window is of stained glass, illustrative of the life of St. Paul. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £150; patrons, the Crown and the Bishop of Ripon, alternately. The Baptists, Independents, Ranters, and Wesleyans have small places of worship; and a large and handsome national and Sunday school, with a house for the master, has been built, in connexion with the church.

Dennaby

DENNABY, a township, in the parish of Mexborough, union of Doncaster, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 6¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Rotherham; containing 167 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book called Degenebi, is situated on the south side of the river Don, and comprises about 1100 acres of land, divided into several well-cultivated farms; it was formerly the property of the Vavasour family. The tithes have been commuted for £283. 10., payable to the Archdeacon of York.

Dennington (St. Mary)

DENNINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hoxne, E. division of Suffolk, 2¾ miles (N.) from Framlingham; containing 979 inhabitants. It comprises 3262a. 1r. 32p., of which about 30 acres are wood, and the remainder arable and pasture land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £36. 3. 4., and in the gift of the family of Alston: the tithes have been commuted for £1050, and the glebe comprises 152 acres, with an excellent glebehouse, much improved by the incumbent, the Hon. F. Hotham. The church is a spacious and handsome structure, in the decorated English style, with a lofty embattled tower crowned with pinnacles: the southern chapel contains several interesting monuments, including a splendid altar-tomb, with recumbent effigies in alabaster, of Sir William Philip, Lord Bardolph, who in 1437 founded a chantry for two priests, which at the Dissolution was valued at £26. 4. 7. There are bequests to the poor, and to the parish generally, to a very considerable amount. Several antiquities have at different times been found, comprising a brass celt, a halberd, and two spurs, with a variety of silver coins. Dean Colet, founder of St. Paul's school, London, and Dr. William Fulke, were rectors of the parish. The Earl of Stradbroke takes his title of Baron Rous, of Dennington, from the place.

Dennis (St.)

DENNIS (St.), a parish, in the union of St. Austell, E. division of Powder hundred and of Cornwall, 5½ miles (S. E. by S.) from St. Columb Major: containing 828 inhabitants. It comprises 3100 acres, of which 1139 are common or waste. There are some tin streams in the parish; and clay, used in the manufacture of china, is found. The living is a rectory not in charge, annexed, with that of St. Stephen's, to the rectory of St. Michael Caerhays: the tithes have been commuted for £260. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Denshanger

DENSHANGER, a hamlet, in the parish of Passenham, union of Potterspury, hundred of Cleley, S. division of Northamptonshire, 1¾ mile (S. W.) from Stony-Stratford; containing 606 inhabitants.

Denston

DENSTON, a township, in the parish of Alveton, union of Cheadle, S. division of the hundred of Totmonslow, N. division of the county of Stafford, 5½ miles (N.) from Uttoxeter; containing 231 inhabitants. It lies on the road from Uttoxeter to Ashbourn, and comprises 667 acres. The Uttoxeter canal also passes through. At Stubwood, in the township, is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists.

Denston, or Denardistan (St. Nicholas)

DENSTON, or Denardistan (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union and hundred of Risbridge, county of Suffolk, 5¾ miles (N.) from Clare; containing 339 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 1054 acres. Denston Hall, formerly the seat of the Robinson family, and now the property of W. Pigott, Esq., is a handsome mansion. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £51; patron, Mr. Pigott.

Dent

DENT, a parochial chapelry, in the parish and union of Sedbergh, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 5 miles (S. E. by S.) from Sedbergh, and 16 (E.) from Kendal; containing 1873 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises about 26,000 acres, of which nearly 6000, by admeasurement, are inclosed, and 20,000, by computation, uninclosed common land; about 1600 acres are arable and meadow, 400 wood, and the rest pasture. It embraces a valley embosomed in high moors and fells, and watered by the river Dee, which joins the river Rawther or Rawthey a little below Sedbergh, and the Lune three miles further down. The soil in the valley is a rich alluvial earth near the river, on the hill-sides hazel and a red soil, and higher up, peat-moss, and good herbage. At Cowgill Head and at Cross are small collieries, where the coal is in seams from six to fifteen inches thick: in the upper end of the vale, on each side, are stone-slate quarries, and quarries of black and grey fossil marble; and at the head of the vale, at Stone-House, are marbleworks. There is also an abundance of rough buildingstone. Formerly the manufacture of woollen-stockings was extensively carried on; but this branch of trade has entirely ceased of late years, some few of the inhabitants only being now employed in the knitting of sailors' caps and jackets, and the weaving of calico, &c. A market is held on Friday; and fairs for cattle on every alternate Friday from February 13th to May 12th: at Whitsuntide and in September are pleasurefairs.

The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of twenty-four Sides-men, who must be landowners; net income, £106, with a house; impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The chapel, dedicated to St. Andrew, is an ancient structure with a tower. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists, and Quakers. A free grammar school was founded by charter of James I., who placed it under the direction of fifteen governors, as a body corporate; the net income is about £50. A good national school was erected in 1845. About twenty years ago, a British tumulus, eighty yards in circumference, was opened on the Gate-house estate; it was walled about five feet high with thin flat stones, and had three passages from the outside, at equal distances, to the centre, where the ashes of the dead were deposited. On the Raw-Riding estate were found, about ten years since, two stone coffins containing human bones. Dent is a polling-place for the West riding.—See Cowgill.

Denton

DENTON, with Houghton-le-Side, a chapelry, in the parish of Gainford, union of Darlington, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 5½ miles (N. W.) from Darlington; containing 119 inhabitants. Denton appears to have belonged to the Balliols, and was afterwards held by the Beauchamps and Nevilles, their successors in the honour of Barnard-Castle. The township comprises by measurement 956 acres of land, which, with the exception of the glebe, is wholly the property of Matthew Culley, Esq., of Fowberry Tower, in the county of Northumberland. Limestone of excellent quality for building is found here, and there is a productive quarry in operation. The Hall, an old mansion of various age and architecture, was probably erected for the most part about the time of Charles I. The village is in a sheltered situation, and watered by a small rivulet; it was once a town of some importance, and is said to have been burnt by Malcolm, King of Scotland, on his route to Cleveland: considerable vestiges of ancient buildings may be traced in the neighbourhood. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Gainford, and has a net income of £50; impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The great tithes have been commuted for £136. 12. 5., and the vicarial for £63; there are 22 acres of glebe belonging to the vicar of Gainford, and 5 to the incumbent of Denton. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, was rebuilt by subscription about 1810, and enlarged in 1836.

Denton (All Saints)

DENTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Peterborough, hundred of Normancross, county of Huntingdon, 1¾ mile (S. W.) from Stilton; containing 97 inhabitants. This parish, which forms a narrow slip of great length, comprises about 600 acres; the soil is partly rich, and partly of inferior quality. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 13. 6½.; net income, £120; patron, William Wells, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1802; the glebe consists of 165 acres. The church was partly rebuilt about 1665, by Sir John Cotton. The sum of £15 per annum, from a donation by the Rev. James Drew, is paid for teaching boys and girls. Sir Robert Bruce Cotton, whose manuscripts are now in the British Museum, was born here in 1570.

Denton (St. Mary Magdalene)

DENTON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Dovor, partly in the hundred of Kinghamford, and partly in that of Eastry, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 8 miles (S. S. E.) from Canterbury; containing 208 inhabitants. It lies on the road from Canterbury to Folkestone, about one mile from the Dovor and London road, and comprises 1062 acres, of which 249 are in wood; the soil is light, and chiefly produces corn. The situation of the parish, in a valley, contributes to the picturesque character of its scenery. There is a pleasure-fair on Whit-Tuesday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 19. 4½ net income, £169; patron, Sir John Brydges, Bart.: the glebe contains 6 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a small edifice, mostly in the early English style, with an east window in the decorated style.

Denton (St. Mary)

DENTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of North Aylesford, hundred of Shamwell, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of the county of Kent; containing 148 inhabitants, and comprising 1190 acres. The church has long been in ruins, and the cemetery converted into a farmyard.

Denton

DENTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Manchester, union of Ashton-under-Lyne, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 3¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Stockport; containing 3440 inhabitants. It lies west of the river Tame, on the road from Stockport to Ashton-under-Lyne, and contains 1630 acres of land. The village, which is five miles distant from Manchester, probably derived its name from Dane-town, an etymology countenanced by the appellations of Danehead-bank and Daneditch-bourne, places in the neighbourhood. The manufacture of hats, both for the home trade and exportation, is carried on upon a large scale; and coal is obtained at several places within the chapelry. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Grosvenor family; net income, £135; impropriators, the Dean and Canons of Manchester. The chapel, dedicated to St. James, was erected about 1530, and has portions in the early and decorated English styles, with some fragments of stained glass in the windows. A church district, comprising part of the township of Denton, and part of that of Haughton, and called Christ-Church, was formed in April, 1846, under the act 6 and 7 Victoria, cap. 37; the population of the district is about 4000, and the living is in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Chester, alternately. The Wesleyans and others have places of worship.

Denton (St. Andrew)

DENTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Grantham; containing 626 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Grantham to Melton-Mowbray, comprises about 3000 acres: there are quarries of good building-stone. The canal from Nottingham to Grantham passes within a mile. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 8. 4., and in the gift of the Prebendary of North Grantham in the Cathedral of Salisbury: the tithes have been commuted for £771. 18. 9., and the glebe contains 53½ acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a handsome structure with a lofty and well-proportioned tower, and contains some fine monuments to the ancestors of Sir W. E. Welby, Bart. An almshouse was founded by William Welby, in 1653, for three widowers and three widows; and £70 per annum, arising from allotments under an inclosure act in 1791, are applied to the relief of the poor. On the Denton estate is St. Christopher's spring, the water of which is similar in its properties to that of Bristol Hot Wells. About 1727, a mosaic pavement, and several large pieces of Roman brick, composing part of some ancient foundations, were discovered in Denton fields.

Denton (St. Mary)

DENTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Depwade, hundred of Earsham, E. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (N. E.) from Harleston; containing 625 inhabitants. It comprises 2437a. 1r. 6p., of which about 1707 acres are arable, 620 pasture, and 110 woodland. In the grounds of Denton House is a curious and picturesque grotto. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24, and in the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury, who appoints a fellow, or one who has been a fellow, of Merton College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £735, and the glebe contains about 90 acres, with a glebe-house, much improved by the rector, the Rev. W. A. Bouverie. The church is partly in the early and partly in the later English style: the interior of the building is exceedingly neat, having been repewed and beautified in 1839; the east window, which has five lights, is filled with stained glass, the gift of the Rev. J. Postlethwayte, rector, who died in 1714. There is an endowed place of worship for Independents; and a national school, erected in 1840, is supported by subscription, and the produce of seven acres of land.

Denton (St. Margaret)

DENTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Hardingstone, hundred of Wymmersley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 6¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Northampton; containing 557 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Bedford to Northampton, and consists of 1572 acres. The living, which may be considered a joint rectory, is divided between the rectors of Whiston and Yardley-Hastings. Denton formerly contained two chapels; that on the north, now demolished, was annexed to the rectory of Whiston, and the other to the rectory of Yardley-Hastings: since the demolition, duty has been performed at the latter chapel by the two rectors jointly; at first alternately, every other Sunday, afterwards for six months each, and now each for a year. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1738; there are two farms, one of which, containing about 70 acres, was given to the rector of Whiston, and the other, comprising about 140 acres, to the rector of Yardley-Hastings. The chapel has been enlarged.

Denton

DENTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Cuddesden, union of Headington, hundred of Bullington, county of Oxford, 6½ miles (W. by N.) from Tetsworth; containing 185 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £171.10., payable to the Bishop of Oxford, and there is a glebe of nearly 29 acres.

Denton (St. Leonard)

DENTON (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Newhaven, hundred of Bishopstone, rape of Pevensey, E. division of Sussex, l½ mile (N.E.) from Newhaven; containing 120 inhabitants. This parish, which is within the liberty of the duchy of Lancaster, is situated on the river Ouse, and comprises by admeasurement 985 acres, whereof 480 are arable, and 503 down land. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 19. 8., and in the gift of H. W. Bates, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £244, and the glebe comprises l¼ acre, and a house. The church is partly in the early English and partly in the decorated style, with a square embattled tower; it consists of a nave and chancel, and has an ancient and richly sculptured font.

Denton

DENTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Otley, Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 4 miles (N. W. by W.) from Otley; containing 185 inhabitants. This place was the baronial residence of the Fairfax family, of whom Ferdinando and Thomas were successively lords Fairfax, and distinguished leaders in the parliamentary war, and the latter, noted for his attachment to antiquarian research, was owner of the Dodsworth MSS., now in the Bodleian library at Oxford. The chapelry comprises 3660 acres, of which 2280 are inclosed and under cultivation, 1130 moor, and 250 woodland. Denton Park, the property of Sir Charles Ibbetson, Bart., lord of the manor, is a handsome mansion, built in 1760, and situated in a wellwooded park, overlooking the river Wharfe. The living is a donative; net income, £44; patron, Sir Charles Ibbetson. The chapel is an ancient structure.

Denton, East

DENTON, EAST, a township, in the parish of Newburn, union and W. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 3 miles (W. N. W.) from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, on the road to Hexham; containing 543 inhabitants. This place, which anciently belonged to the Whalton barony, was given in 1380 to the priory of Tynemouth, and since the Reformation has been possessed by various families. The township is bounded on the south by the river Tyne, and, including about 60 acres in the township of Sugley, comprises 807a. 1r. 31p., of which 499 acres are arable, 259 meadow, and 49 plantation, roads, and buildings; the surface is undulated, and the soil well adapted to the growth of wheat. There is a mine of fire-clay; and coal was very extensively wrought by the late Mr. Montague. Denton Hall, built on the site of a residence of the monks of Tynemouth, is a venerable mansion in the Elizabethan style, standing near the high road from Newcastle to Carlisle, and surrounded by lofty trees. Mrs. Elizabeth Montague, distinguished for her Essay on the Writings and Genius of Shakspeare, resided here, and was here visited by Garrick, Johnson, Beattie, and other eminently gifted men. The remains of a chapel and cemetery were discovered about sixty years since; and at Denton burn are vestiges of the great Roman wall, faced with stone, in the vicinity of which altars, inscribed stones, and many remarkable coins and medals have been found. The manufacturing village of Scotswood, on the banks of the Tyne, is in this township.—See Scotswood.

Denton, Nether (St. Cuthbert)

DENTON, NETHER (St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of Brampton, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland, 5 miles (E.N. E.) from Brampton; containing 280 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Irthing, and comprises about six square miles; the land is all inclosed, and nearly equally divided between pasture and arable, the soil of the latter of which is light and sandy. Freestone and limestone are abundant, and there is a considerable quantity of shell-marl. The Newcastle and Carlisle railway has a station here. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 5. 2.; net income, £196; patron, the Bishop of Carlisle. The tithes of Nether and Upper Denton were commuted for land in 1798. The church, though small, is handsome, and picturesquely situated; and nearly opposite to it, is the fine piece of romantic scenery called Goat Crags, on the banks of the Irthing.

Denton, Upper

DENTON, UPPER, a parish, in the union of Brampton, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland, 6 miles (E.N.E.) from Brampton; containing 127 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1100 acres, about one-third of which is arable, and the rest pasture land. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £47; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Carlisle.

Denton, West

DENTON, WEST, a township, in the parish of Newburn, union and W. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 3 miles (W. by N.) from Newcastle; containing 420 inhabitants. It lies on the south side of the Hexham road, about 2 miles east-bynorth from Newburn, and comprises 322 acres of land: the Hall is pleasant and commodious. The Roman barriers seem to have passed near.



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