Eastbridge - Easthams

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

127-129

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'Eastbridge - Easthams', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 127-129. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50935 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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Eastbridge

EASTBRIDGE, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Bridge, hundred of Westgate, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent; containing 46 inhabitants. This place comprises 1107 acres of land. For an account of Eastbridge Hospital, see Canterbury.

Eastbridge

EASTBRIDGE, a parish, in the union and liberty of Romney-Marsh, locally in the hundred of Worth, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 5 miles (N. by E.) from New Romney; containing 22 inhabitants. It comprises 1082 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8.; net income, £73; patron, the Archbishop of Canterbury. The church has been demolished.

Eastburn

EASTBURN, a township, in the parish of Kirkburn, union of Driffield, Bainton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 3 miles (S. W.) from Driffield; containing 13 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1420 acres of land, all in one farm, and is situated to the west of the road from Driffield to Beverley.

Eastburn, with Steeton.—See Steeton.

EASTBURN, with Steeton.—See Steeton.

Eastbury

EASTBURY, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Lambourn, union of Hungerford, county of Berks, 2 miles (S. E. by E.) from Lambourn; containing 350 inhabitants, and comprising 2354a. 3r. 15p. Here was formerly a chapel, dedicated to St. James. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school is endowed with £10 per annum.

Eastby, with Embsay.—See Embsay.

EASTBY, with Embsay.—See Embsay.

East-Church (All Saints)

EAST-CHURCH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Sheppey, liberty of the Isle of Sheppey, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Queenborough; containing 1019 inhabitants. This place takes its name from its relative position with reference to Minster, which lies to the west of its church. The parish comprises 7511 acres, of which 28 are in wood: the surface towards the south is flat, and rises in gentle undulations towards the north; the soil in the lower grounds is marshy, and in other parts clay, alternated with sharp gravel. A fair for toys is held on Holy-Thursday. The living is a rectory and vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £1724; patron, Miles Barton, Esq. The church is a spacious and handsome embattled edifice, formerly belonging to the convent at Boxley. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also a school in union with the National Society, endowed with a house and land of the annual value of £10. Many petrified fossils, supposed to be antediluvian, have been found upon the seashore.

Eastcott

EASTCOTT, a ville, in the parish of Ruislip, union of Uxbridge, hundred of Elthorne, county of Middlesex; containing 538 inhabitants.

Eastcott

EASTCOTT, a tything, in the parish of Swindon, union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Kingsbridge, Swindon and N. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 287 inhabitants.

Eastcott

EASTCOTT, a tything, in the parish of Urchfont, union of Devizes, hundred of Swanborough, Devizes and N. divisions of the county of Wilts; 1½ mile (N. E.) from East Lavington; containing 146 inhabitants.

Eastcotts

EASTCOTTS, a township, in the parish of Cardington, hundred of Wixamtree, union and county of Bedford, 3½ miles (S. E.) from the town of Bedford; comprising the hamlets of Cotton-End, Harrowden, and Fenlake, and containing 859 inhabitants.

Eastcourt

EASTCOURT, a hamlet, in the parish of Crudwell, union and hundred of Malmesbury, Malmesbury and Kingswood divisions of Wilts, 4½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Malmesbury; containing 156 inhabitants.

Easter, Good (St. Andrew)

EASTER, GOOD (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Chelmsford, hundred of Dunmow, N. division of Essex, 8 miles (N. W. by W.) from Chelmsford; containing 504 inhabitants. This place, at the time of the Norman survey, belonged to Eustace, Earl of Boulogne, by whom it was given to the collegiate church of St. Martin-le-Grand, in London. The parish contains by measurement 2000 acres, nearly the whole of which is arable; the surface is pleasingly varied, in several parts forming gentle acclivities, and the soil is a lightish mould, on a subsoil of clay, alternated with chalk. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the vicarage of High Easter consolidated in 1771, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London. The great tithes, belonging to W. Rust, Esq., have been commuted for £369, and the vicarial for £120. The church is an ancient edifice, with a tower of stone surmounted by a tall spire of wood; in the chancel are several arched recesses in the wall, which were probably cells or chapels. There is a strong chalybeate spring.

Easter, High (St. Mary)

EASTER, HIGH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Dunmow, N. division of Essex, 5 miles (S. by W.) from Dunmow; containing 975 inhabitants. The parish takes its distinguishing epithet from its elevated situation with respect to the parish of Good-Easter. It comprises by computation nearly 5000 acres, of which by far the greater portion is arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with 137 acres of wood; the soil of the arable land is tenacious, and produces fine crops: the surface is gently undulated. The living is a vicarage, consolidated with that of Good-Easter, and valued in the king's books at £14. 14. 7.; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's. The church is a spacious and lofty structure, with a stately tower of stone surmounted by a spire.

Eastergate (St. George)

EASTERGATE (St. George), a parish, in the union of West Hampnett, hundred of Avisford, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Chichester; containing 208 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 789 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 19. 9½.; net income, £304; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Chichester. The church is in the early English style, with later additions.

Easterton

EASTERTON, a tything, in the parish of East Lavington, union of Devizes, hundred of Swanborough, Devizes and N. divisions of Wilts, 1 mile (N. E.) from East Lavington; containing 495 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £415, of which £310 are payable to the Dean and Chapter of Christ-Church, Oxford, and £105 to the vicar of the parish.

Eastertown

EASTERTOWN, a hamlet, in the parish of Lympsham, union of Axbridge, hundred of Brent with Wrington, E. division of the county of Somerset; containing 215 inhabitants.

Eastfield

EASTFIELD, a hamlet, in the parish of St. John the Baptist, Peterborough, union and soke of Peterborough, N. division of the county of Northampton, ¾ of a mile (N. N. E.) from Peterborough; containing 89 inhabitants. It is situated on the road leading from Peterborough to Thorney.

Eastgate

EASTGATE, a hamlet, in the parish of Stanhope, union of Weardale, N. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 8¼ miles (W. by N.) from Wolsingham. It is situated on the north side of the Wear, at the junction of the Rokhope burn with that river, and on the road from St. John's Weardale to Stanhope; and is distant three miles west of Stanhope. A national school was built by the late Bishop of Durham, in which divine service is performed every Sunday afternoon; and there is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Eastham (St. Mary)

EASTHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union, and Higher division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of the county of Chester; comprising the village of Ellesmere-Port, and the townships of Eastham, Hooton, Nether and Over Pool, Great and Little Sutton, Thornton-Childer, and part of Whitby; and containing 2377 inhabitants, of whom 372 are in the township of Eastham, 9½ miles (N. N. W.) from Chester. The manor was given by Randal de Gernon, Earl of Chester, to the convent of St. Werburgh, as a compensation for the ills he had done to that house. After the dissolution of monasteries, Henry VIII. gave the manor to the Dean and Chapter of Chester, from whom it was obtained for certain annual rents, about 1553, by Sir Richard Cotton, who a few years afterwards conveyed it to Sir Rowland Stanley, ancestor of the Stanley family, of Hooton. The manor of Plimyard was purchased by the Stanleys about the year 1590. The parish is intersected by the Chester and Birkenhead road, the Ellesmere canal, and the Chester and Birkenhead railway, and is situated on the river Mersey. In the township of Eastham are 1205 acres, of a sandy soil. About a mile from the village is a ferry on the Mersey, where is an hotel of recent erection, with pleasure-grounds attached, an agreeable place of resort during the summer, the vicinity affording beautiful scenery. Sir William Massey Stanley has lately appropriated about 100 acres of land for building purposes; the land is divided into suitable plots of an acre or two each, after the designs of Mr. Clark Rampling, architect, of Liverpool, and villas are in progress of erection, which will add greatly to the importance of the locality. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 13.; net income, £240; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Chester; impropriators, Sir W. Stanley, and the families of White and Edwards. The great tithes of the township of Eastham have been commuted for £150, and the small for £135: the vicar has a glebe of 14 acres. The church is a large and handsome edifice of red stone, consisting of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a tower and elegant spire; the north aisle terminates in a chancel belonging to the house of Hooton, in which are many monuments to the family. At Ellesmere-Port is a second incumbency. A national school is supported by Sir William Stanley, aided by some small bequests for the education of children.

Eastham (St. Peter and St. Paul)

EASTHAM (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Tenbury, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Tenbury and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 18 miles (N. W.) from Worcester, on the road to Ludlow; containing, with the chapelries of Hanley-Child and Orleton, 599 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Teme, and comprises 4935 acres, whereof 2327a. 3r. 37p. are in the township of Eastham; the whole is in about equal portions of arable and pasture, with 140 acres of hops. The surface is much undulated; the soil a deep loam; and the scenery panoramic, beautiful, and well wooded, embracing the Eastham range of hills. The land is very rich, especially near the Teme, and produces wheat, fruit, barley, beans, &c. Excellent limestone is obtained. The living is a rectory, with that of Hanley-William annexed, valued in the king's books at £28. 15. 10.; net income, £920; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Charles Turner. The church stands in a beautiful vale, and is an ancient Gothic structure, apparently built on a Saxon foundation: in 1830 the interior was newly pewed, a gallery added, the old wooden spire replaced by a substantial tower, and the whole put into excellent repair. At Hanley-Child and Orleton are chapels of ease. Court House, an old mansion near the church, now in the family of the Whitcombes, was formerly the seat of the Baron of Burford.

Easthampstead (St. Mary Magdalene)

EASTHAMPSTEAD (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, and the head of a union, partly in the hundred of Cookham, but chiefly in that of Ripplesmere, county of Berks; comprising the posting-village of Bracknell, and containing 627 inhabitants. This place was anciently a royal residence; and Richard II. is said to have resorted hither for the diversion of hunting. The parish comprises 5186a. 1r. 19p., more than one-half of which is heath; of the remainder, about 1100 acres are arable, 700 meadow and pasture, and 370 coppice and plantations: the soil is partly clayey and partly a rich loam, the surface is undulated, and the scenery finely varied. Easthampstead Park, the property of the Marquess of Downshire, and South Hill Park, belonging to the Earl of Limerick, are handsome residences. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 1. 3., and in the gift of the Dean and Canons of ChristChurch, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £488, and the glebe comprises 85 acres. The oak pulpit in the church is beautifully carved. The poor law union comprises 5 parishes and places, and contains a population of 5935. There are several chalybeate springs; and a Roman military work, called Cæsar's Camp, in which numerous coins have been dug up.

Easthams

EASTHAMS, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Crewkerne, union of Chard, W. division of Somerset; containing 11 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £36.