Easthope - Easton-Piercy

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

129-132

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'Easthope - Easton-Piercy', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 129-132. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50936 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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Easthope (St. Peter)

EASTHOPE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Church-Stretton, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 4¾ miles (S. W.) from Wenlock; containing 108 inhabitants. This is a retired parish, with pleasing scenery: the renowned Wenlock-Edge stretches through it; and on an opposite side is a Roman encampment. The plantations and grounds connected with Lutwyche Hall, a mansion built by Judge Lutwyche in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, serve much to adorn and beautify the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 3. 1½.; net income, £133; patron, R. Benson, Esq.; incumbent, the Rev. Robert Armitage. The church is remarkable for its encaustic tiles, and has a beautifully proportioned chancel window. In the churchyard are two flat tombstones, with the sculptured figure of the cross, supposed to note the burial-place of two monks brought hither from the abbey of Wenlock; they lie on the north side, midway between two ancient yew-trees.

Easthorpe (St. Mary)

EASTHORPE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 4 miles (N. E. by E.) from Kelvedon; containing 146 inhabitants. The parish comprises 900 acres, of which 30 are woodland and plantations, and the remainder chiefly arable. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the patronage of the Hon. Col. Onslow: the tithes have been commuted for £265, and there are 27 acres of glebe. The church is a small edifice consisting of a nave and chancel, and has several ancient monuments; in the south wall is a recess, which appears to have contained the tomb of the founder.

Easthorpe

EASTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of Bottesford, union of Grantham, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester; containing 417 inhabitants.

Easthorpe

EASTHORPE, a township, in the parish and union of Southwell, Southwell division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham. This place has been always regarded as a distinct portion of the town of Southwell: it consists of one street, comprising some irregularly-built but handsome houses, with spacious gardens, in one of which is a copious spring, containing fixed air, carbonate of lime, magnesia, and calcareous earth. George Stainton, in 1553, bequeathed about 35 acres of land, which produce £74 per annum, whereof £25 are paid for the instruction of children, and the remainder is expended in public improvements.

Eastington

EASTINGTON, a tything, in the parish and union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 1½ mile (S. E.) from Northleach; containing 351 inhabitants. It had a chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, which has long since gone to decay; the burial-ground is still remaining, and belongs to the vicar of Northleach.

Eastington (St. Michael)

EASTINGTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Wheatenhurst, Lower division of the hundred of Whitestone, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Stroud; containing, with the tything of Alkerton, 1871 inhabitants, of whom 763 are in the tything of Eastington. The parish comprises 2044 acres of good land, and the Stroudwater canal and the Gloucester and Bath road pass through it. There are several good houses inhabited by families of respectability, and shops abundantly supplied; and a market is held every Saturday at Mill-End. The woollen manufacture was established here at a very early period, and about 800 persons are now employed in the manufacture of superfine woollen-cloths and kerseymeres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £32. 14. 9½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Thomas Peters: the tithes have been commuted for £525, and the glebe comprises 62 acres. The church is a venerable structure, with a tower, and within the few last years has been enlarged by the addition of a vestryroom, and entirely new-pewed and beautified. The parsonage-house, a very ancient building, was taken down in 1832, and an elegant house erected on a more elevated site. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; and national schools endowed with the interest of £537. The Duke of Buckingham, who was beheaded in the reign of Henry VIII., had a large house in the parish, which during the civil war was garrisoned by the parliament.

East-Leach-Martin, or Bouthrop (St. Mary)

EAST-LEACH-MARTIN, or Bouthrop (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Brightwells-Barrow, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4 miles (N.) from Lechlade; containing 186 inhabitants. It comprises 1900 acres by measurement. There are quarries of stone for building and fencing, and for the roads; shells of various kinds, but chiefly of the cockle, are found imbedded in it. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £150.

East-Leach-Turville (St. Andrew)

EAST-LEACH-TURVILLE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Brightwells-Barrow, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Lechlade; containing 421 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2400 acres: stone for building and other purposes is quarried. The living is a perpetual curacy, net income, £66; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Gloucester. The church is an extremely small building, with a fine Norman arch at the entrance. A school is partly supported by subscription. The Roman Ikeneldstreet enters the parish on the east from Oxfordshire, and joins the fosse-way at Cirencester. In Churchlane is a mineral spring, which is strongly cathartic.

Eastley

EASTLEY, a tything, in the parish and union of South Stoneham, hundred of Mansbridge, Southampton and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Southampton; containing 15 inhabitants.

Eastling (St. Mary)

EASTLING (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Faversham, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 5 miles (S. W.) from Faversham; containing 437 inhabitants. It comprises 1915 acres: the surface is hilly; the greater portion arable, and the remainder woodland and pasture, the wood covering 428 acres. A fair is held on the 14th of September. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16, and in the patronage of the Earl of Winchilsea: the tithes have been commuted for £500, and there are 36 acres of glebe.

Eastlound

EASTLOUND, a hamlet, in the parish of Haxey, union of Gainsborough, W. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 158 inhabitants. It lies half a mile east of the village of Haxey, and is distant westward from the river Trent about a mile.

Eastmead-Street

EASTMEAD-STREET, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Calne, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts; with 450 inhabitants.

Eastmoore

EASTMOORE, a hamlet, in the parish of BartonBendish, union of Downham, hundred of Clackclose, W. division of Norfolk, 2¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Stoke-Ferry; containing 106 inhabitants. The hamlet includes a tract of fenny land and common, inclosed in 1777, and now under cultivation. It had a chapel dedicated to St. John the Baptist, which at the time of the Reformation was converted into a farmhouse.

Eastnor (St. John the Baptist)

EASTNOR (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Ledbury, hundred of Radlow, county of Hereford, 2¼ miles (S. E. by E.) from Ledbury; containing 500 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the borders of Worcestershire and Gloucestershire, the former bounding it on the east and the latter on the south; it is intersected by the road from Cheltenham to Hereford, and comprises 3185a. 1r. 3p., of which 776 acres are waste. The arable, pasture, and wood, are in nearly equal portions; and the surface is strikingly diversified with hills of every variety of form and elevation, which, being mostly covered with plantations, give it an aspect of richness and beauty: there are numerous springs. The substratum is a grey limestone, in which shells are found thickly imbedded; it exists in large masses, and, being susceptible of a high polish, is much used for chimney-pieces. Eastnor Castle, the residence of Earl Somers, has been rebuilt at an immense expense, on the plan of an ancient baronial castle. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 19. 5., and in the gift of the Earl: the rectorial tithes have been commuted for £360, and certain impropriate tithes for £100; the glebe comprises 61a. 3p. The church, which is in the early English style, contains several handsome monuments of marble to the Cocks family. There are some ancient intrenchments in the parish, and to the east are remains of a castle, consisting of the mote and one of the towers. The place gives the inferior title of Viscount to Earl Somers.

Eastoft

EASTOFT, a chapelry, in the parish of Crowle, union of Thorne, W. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (N. E.) from Crowle; containing 282 inhabitants. This is a pleasant place on the south side of the small channel of the Old Don river, opposite a village of the same name in Yorkshire. The township comprises 1273a. 1r. 2p. The tithes were commuted for land in 1813.

Eastoft

EASTOFT, a township, in the parish of Adlingfleet, union of Goole, Lower division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 10 miles (S. S. E.) from Howden; containing 82 inhabitants. It comprises, with the adjoining township of Haldenby, about 1490 acres, of which 300 acres are uncultivated land, but in process of warping. The village is on the Old Don river. The tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1774; and under the recent act were further commuted for £66, of which £49. 10. are payable to the vicar, and £16. 10. to an impropriator.

Easton

EASTON, a tything, in the parish of Welford, union of Newbury, hundred of Faircross, county of Berks; containing 162 inhabitants.

Easton (St. Peter)

EASTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of Leightonstone, union and county of Huntingdon, 3½ miles (N. E.) from Kimbolton; containing 186 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, not in charge, in the patronage of the Bishop of Ely; net income, £68. The town lands produce a rental of £57. 10., which sum, with other contributions, together about £70, is distributed among the poor.

Easton

EASTON, a hamlet, in the parish of South Stoke, union of Grantham, wapentake of Winnibriggs and Threo, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 1½ mile (N.) from Colsterworth; containing 179 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1806. The chapel is in ruins.

Easton (St. Peter)

EASTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Forehoe, E. division of Norfolk, 6¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Norwich; containing 279 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1566 acres, of which 1140 are arable, 170 pasture, and 256 wood. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 10½.; patron, E. R. Fellowes, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £31, and the small for £170; the vicar has also a glebe of 29 acres. The church is an ancient edifice, with a campanile turret, replacing a tower which fell down in 1778. There is a place of worship for Baptists. Cardinal Easton, who flourished in the reign of Richard II., was a native of the parish.

Easton (All Saints)

EASTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Stamford, hundred of Willybrook, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Stamford; containing 883 inhabitants. The parish is on the road from Stamford to Kettering, and comprises by measurement 3300 acres: there are quarries of building-stone and slate. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 8. 9.; net income, £440; patron, the Marquess of Exeter. The tithes were commuted for land and a corn-rent in 1817. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Here is a free school, endowed by R. Garford, in 1670, with houses producing a rental of £65.

Easton

EASTON, a tything, in the city and union of Wells, hundred of Wells-Forum, E. division of Somerset; containing 273 inhabitants. Here is a church, which is in the gift of the Vicar of Wells.

Easton (St. Mary)

EASTON (St. Mary), a parish, on the south bank of the river Itchen, in the union of Winchester, hundred of Fawley, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Winchester; containing 505 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 6. 8.: it is described in Domesday book as part of the possessions of the Bishop of Winchester, who is still patron, and who possesses a farm in the parish. The tithes have been commuted for £620, and the glebe contains nearly 5 acres. The church is ancient, and worthy of notice from the apse of its chancel, specimens of the horseshoe arch, and an ornamental Norman doorway: its windows were originally the narrow ones of the crypts of Normandy, but, with one exception, they have been replaced by others, or much altered. The parsonage, previous to the Reformation, was the residence of the monks of Hyde Abbey, Winchester; most of the original building still remains, though much modernised. The churchwardens are in receipt of the proceeds of some land, but by whom left is unknown.

Easton (All Saints)

EASTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Plomesgate, hundred of Loes, E. division of Suffolk, 2¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Wickham-Market; containing 415 inhabitants. This was the residence of the families of Wingfield and Nassau, and Easton Park is now a seat of the Duke of Hamilton's. The parish comprises by measurement 1444 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 18. 6½., and in the gift of his Grace: the tithes have been commuted for £320, and the glebe comprises 23 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by an octagonal turret; in the chancel are brasses to the Wingfields, and there are good monuments to the late Earl of Rochford and his brother.

Easton (Holy Trinity)

EASTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Pewsey, hundred of Kinwardstone, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of Wilts, 3¼ miles (E. by N.) from Pewsey; containing 532 inhabitants. A priory was founded at this place in the reign of Henry III., by Stephen, Archdeacon of Salisbury, for canons of the Trinitarian order, for the redemption of captives; it flourished till the Dissolution, when its revenues amounted to £55. 14. 4. The parish comprises by computation 2200 acres: a pleasure-fair is held on Trinity-Monday. The living is a royal donative, in the patronage of the Marquess of Ailesbury, who pays the chaplain. The church was built by Edward, Earl of Hertford, son of the Protector, in 1591, at a short distance from the site of the priory, which, with its church and conventual buildings, had been previously destroyed. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Easton

EASTON, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Bridlington, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 1¼ mile (W.) from Bridlington; containing 17 inhabitants. It is on the road from Bridlington to Caythorpe, and comprises 800 acres of land.

Easton-Bavents (St. Nicholas)

EASTON-BAVENTS (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 1 mile (N. N.E.) from Southwold; containing 11 inhabitants. This place, which is by antiquaries identified with the Extensio of Ptolemy, was formerly the most eastern point of land in the kingdom; but the promontory called Easton Ness has long since been washed away by the sea, which has made great encroachments on this part of the coast; and the church and an ancient chapel, with the greater portion of the parish, have disappeared. A market was granted to Thomas de Bavent, from whom the place takes the affix to its name. The parish now comprises only 300 acres, by measurement; the scenery is in many parts highly picturesque, and on the north side of the parish is a fine sheet of water called Easton Broad. The living is a discharged rectory, consolidated with the rectory of Binacre, and valued in the king's books at £6.

Easton, Great (St. John)

EASTON, GREAT (St. John), a parish, in the union and hundred of Dunmow, N. division of Essex, 2½ miles (N. N. W.) from Dunmow; containing 929 inhabitants. It is situated near the river Chelmer, and comprises by survey 2537 acres, of which about two-thirds are arable; the lands are in a high state of cultivation, and the surrounding country abounds with pleasing scenery. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Viscount Maynard: the tithes have been commuted for £740, and there are 84 acres of glebe. The church is an ancient edifice, containing some details of Norman architecture, especially in the south porch, which has a fine semicircular doorway. In 1759, Rebecca Mead bequeathed land now producing £38 per annum, for clothing and teaching girls; and in 1761, Charles, Lord Maynard, endowed a school.

Easton, Grey

EASTON, GREY, a parish, in the union of Malmesbury, hundred of Chippenham, Malmesbury and Kingswood, and N. divisions of Wilts, 3½ miles (W.) from Malmesbury; containing 165 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1046 acres, of which the surface is flat, and the soil generally a stone brash; the village is situated on the road from Bristol to Malmesbury, on the side of a hill sloping towards the river Avon. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 0. 5., and in the gift of the Rev. W. S. Birch: the tithes have been commuted for £265, and the glebe comprises nearly 25 acres. The church, with the exception of the tower, was rebuilt in 1838. An almshouse for six women is endowed with £50 per annum.

Easton-In-Gordano (St. George)

EASTON-IN-GORDANO (St. George), a parish, in the union of Bedminster, hundred of Portbury, E. division of Somerset, 6 miles (W. N. W.) from Bristol; containing, with the hamlet of Crockerne-Pill, 2199 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1570 acres, whereof 300 consist of common lands; and is situated on the navigable river Avon, which divides Easton on the north-east from the county of Gloucester, and falls into the Bristol Channel to the north of it. Building-stone abounds. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Prebendary of Easton in the Cathedral of Wells, and valued in the king's books at £5. 9. 4½.: the great tithes have been commuted for £60, and the vicarial for £269. 12. 6. The church is a modern building, excepting the steeple, which is of ancient date. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and at the south-eastern extremity of the parish was a chapel, the site of which is still called Chapel Pill. Bishop Bull was for some time vicar of Easton.

Easton, Little

EASTON, LITTLE, a parish, in the union and hundred of Dunmow, N. division of Essex, 2½ miles (N. W.) from Dunmow; containing 343 inhabitants. The village is pleasingly situated on the margin of the river Chelmer, over which is a wooden bridge. The manor, after being for many generations in the possession of numerous distinguished families, was granted by Queen Elizabeth to the ancestor of Viscount Maynard, the present proprietor, whose elegant seat, Easton Lodge, was burnt down in 1847. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of his Lordship: the tithes have been commuted for £316, and the glebe comprises 58 acres. The church, a fine edifice with a tower, is of considerable antiquity; and on the south side of the chancel is a chapel, formerly belonging to the Bourchier family, and which contains several splendid monuments to the Maynards.

Easton Magna (St. Andrew)

EASTON MAGNA (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Uppingham, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 8¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Market-Harborough; containing 600 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2277a. 3r. 39p., and is situated on the borders of the counties of Rutland and Northampton, from which latter it is separated by the river Welland. The living is a vicarage, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Peterborough: an allotment of 195a. 1r. 2p. of land, and a money payment, were assigned in lieu of the great tithes, under an inclosure act passed in 1804; and the vicarial glebe consists of 78a. 29p. The church was repaired and repewed in 1832. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans; and a school endowed with £5 per annum. The poor annually receive clothing at the cost of £30, and also £15, the rent of an allotment which was made under the inclosure act.

Easton-Maudit (St. Peter and St. Paul)

EASTON-MAUDIT (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of Higham-Ferrers, N. division of the county of Northampton, 10½ miles (E. by S.) from Northampton; containing 214 inhabitants. The parish was formerly the property of the family of Yelverton, viscounts Longueville and earls of Sussex. It is situated on the borders of Buckinghamshire, which bounds it on the south, and the road between Wellingborough and Olney runs on the east; the area consists of 1764a. 2r. 29p. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £122, and the glebe comprises 9 acres. The church has a spire of remarkably elegant form, ornamented at its base with flying buttresses, and contains some handsome monuments to the Yelverton family, judges and attorneys-general in the reigns of Elizabeth and James; also a monument to Morton, Bishop of Durham, who, during the parliamentary war, sought refuge at Easton House, where he died. Dr. Percy, Bishop of Dromore, author of Reliques of Ancient Poetry, was at one time vicar.

Easton-Neston (St. Mary)

EASTON-NESTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Towcester, hundred of Cleley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 1¼ mile (E.) from Towcester; containing 169 inhabitants. It is situated on the left bank of the river Tow, and consists of 1710 acres, of the full average quality in productiveness. Here is the seat of the Earl of Pomfret, a handsome mansion partly erected by Sir Christopher Wren, and partly by Hawkesmoor, but which has since undergone considerable alterations. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £151; patron, the Earl of Pomfret; impropriators, the Warden and Fellows of New College, Oxford. The church has some interesting monuments.

Easton-Piercy

EASTON-PIERCY, a tything, in the parish of Kington St. Michael, union of Chippenham, N. division of the hundred of Damerham, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts; containing 41 inhabitants. John Aubrey, the antiquary, who is said to have assisted Dugdale in collecting materials for the Monasticon, was born here in 1629.