Edlington - Egdean

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

147-150

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'Edlington - Egdean', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 147-150. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50941+ Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


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Edlington (St. Helen)

EDLINGTON (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, N. division of the wapentake of Gartree, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2 miles (N. W.) from Horncastle; containing 254 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2500 acres, of which 1750 are pasture and meadow, 700 arable, and about 50 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 4. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £263; the impropriation belongs to Uppingham grammar school.

Edlington (St. Peter)

EDLINGTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Doncaster, S. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 5¼ miles (S. W. by S.) from Doncaster; containing 127 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1727a. 2r. 30p., of which 1195 acres are arable and pasture, 453 wood, and the remainder roads and waste. Of the woodland 372 acres belong to Earl Fitzwilliam, who has divided it into several portions by roads, all meeting in the centre, where is the woodman's house: within this wood are, a conical pile of rough stones called Blow Hall, and the remains of an intrenchment named Double Dykes. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the gift of the family of Wrightson: the tithes have been commuted for £258, and the glebe comprises 51 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, with a tower, and contains some monuments to Lord Wharton's family; the nave is separated from the chancel by a fine Norman arch.

Edmondbyers (St. Edmund)

EDMONDBYERS (St. Edmund), a parish, in the union of Weardale, W. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Shotley-Bridge; containing, with the chapelry of Hunstonworth, 1014 inhabitants, of whom 458 are in the township of Edmondbyers. This parish, which is situated on the road from Newcastle-upon-Tyne, viâ Shotley-Bridge, to Stanhope, and bounded on the north and east by the river Derwent, comprises about 5000 acres, of which 2168 are arable, producing excellent crops of wheat, barley, and oats, and the remainder moorland. Lead-ore is found, and one of the earliest mills for fusing it was established by the Blacket family in the reign of Charles II.; the London Lead Company erected works here in 1800, and two mines recently opened are now in full operation. Stone of excellent quality for building is quarried to a great extent, for the supply of the neighbouring district. The Pontop and South Shields railway passes on the east. The village consists of cottages scattered round a small green, on the descent of a hill washed by the Birdenhope beck, which falls into the Derwent; the houses are of stone raised from the quarries of the place. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 11. 4., and in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Durham, with a gross income of £230, including the rent of a glebe of 121 acres: the tithes of Edmondbyers township have been commuted for £141. The church is a neat edifice in the early English style, and consists of a nave and chancel, the latter supported on short buttresses. At Hunstonworth is a distinct incumbency. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Edmondsley

EDMONDSLEY, a township, in the parish and union of Chester-le-Street, Middle division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 3 miles (S. W.) from Chester le-Street; containing 253 inhabitants. It is situated on the south of the Cone beck, and comprises 2218 acres of land, four-fifths of which are arable, of good quality; iron-ore has been wrought, and a coal-mine is in operation.

Edmondthorpe (St. Michael)

EDMONDTHORPE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 6 miles (N.) from Oakham; containing 261 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1696 acres, and the Oakham canal passes within a mile and a half. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 12. 8½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £434. The church, the tower of which is in the early English style, appears to have been enlarged or partly rebuilt at a later period. About £15 per annum, arising from a bequest by Sir Edward Smith in 1720, are distributed among the poor in clothing and money. There are the remains of a Roman camp.

Edmonsham (St. Nicholas)

EDMONSHAM (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wimborne and Cranborne, hundred of Cran borne, Wimborne division of Dorset, 1½ mile (S. by E.) from Cranborne; containing, with the tything of West Worth, 298 inhabitants. It comprises 1654 acres, of which 150 are waste land or common. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 5., and in the patronage of Hector Munro, Esq., for two turns, and the Earl of Shaftesbury for one turn: the tithes have been commuted for £323, and the glebe comprises 3½ acres. There is a chalybeate spring.

Edmonton (All Saints)

EDMONTON (All Saints), a parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Edmonton, county of Middlesex, 7 miles (N.) from London; containing 9027 inhabitants. This place, which had risen into some consideration prior to the Conquest, is in Domesday book called Ædelmeton, probably as having been the residence of some distinguished personage during the heptarchy. The extensive forest in the neighbourhood, of which Enfield Chace formed a part, made it the resort of many individuals, who occasionally retired hither to enjoy the diversion of hunting; and from its convenient distance from the metropolis, it became the residence of many opulent families. The village stands pleasantly on the high road to Hertford, along which it extends for more than a mile, containing, exclusively of small dwellings, several ranges of respectable houses, and, in detached situations, many elegant mansions and villas; it is well lighted with gas, and amply supplied with water. The New River intersects several parts of the parish, producing a picturesque effect in the grounds and meadows through which it winds. A considerable coach manufactory affords employment to more than 60 persons; and an extensive trade in timber is carried on by means of the Lea river navigation, which passes within three-quarters of a mile of the village. A station on the Eastern Counties railway is also situated here. Fairs, chiefly for pleasure, are held on St. Giles and Ascension days, on a part of Enfield Chace, near Southgate, in the parish, under letters-patent of James I. The petty-sessions for the division are held at the Angel inn on alternate Fridays, and a court leet and court baron are held on the Tuesday in Whitsun-week: the powers of the county debt-court of Edmonton, established in 1847, extend over the sub-registration-districts of Edmonton, Enfield, and Tottenham.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18; net income, £1550; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1799. The church is a spacious ancient structure in the later English style, once of flint stone; in 1772 it was cased with brick, but it has a square embattled tower in its original state. At Southgate and Winchmore-Hill are separate incumbencies. There are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, Independents, and Wesleyans. A charity school for boys was founded in 1624, by Edward Latymer; a charity school for girls was established by subscription in 1778, and a national school in 1822. The poor law union of Edmonton comprises seven parishes or places, of which five are in Middlesex, and one in each of the counties of Essex and Hertford; and contains a population of 52,569. On Bush Hill, in the parish, are remains of a large circular encampment, supposed to have been the site of a British town, and near which Sir Hugh Myddelton had a residence. Bury Hall, the seat of President Bradshaw, retains many of its original features. Peter Fabell, a learned man of eccentric character, who flourished in the reign of Henry VII., and obtained the reputation of being a conjuror, is said to have been born in the parish, which became noted by the production of a drama, founded upon some of his alleged exploits, and called the "Merry Devil of Edmonton," first printed in 1608. The place also gave rise to a tragedy founded on the history of an unfortunate woman who was condemned and executed on a charge of witchcraft, in 1621; and it has been lastly celebrated as the scene of Cowper's popular ballad of John Gilpin, in allusion to which there is a painting in front of the Bell inn. Dr. Brook Taylor, secretary to the Royal Society, and author of an ingenious treatise on Perspective, was born here in 1685; and Archbishop Tillotson resided here constantly while Dean of St. Paul's, and occasionally after his translation to the primacy.

Ednaston

EDNASTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Brailsford, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 1¼ mile (S. W.) from Brailsford; containing 217 inhabitants. The manor was given to the priory of Tutbury, by Robert, Earl Ferrers, the elder, and was granted at the Dissolution to Sir John Gifford, who conveyed it to Francis Shirley, Esq., ancestor of the present Earl Ferrers. The village lies south of the Ashbourn and Derby road.

Edstaston

EDSTASTON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Wem, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of the county of Salop, 1¾ mile (N. by E.) from Wem; containing 452 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary.

Edstock

EDSTOCK, with Beer, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of Cannington, union of Bridgwater, W. division of Somerset; containing 15 inhabitants.

Edston

EDSTON, a hamlet, in the parish of WoottonWawen, union of Stratford-upon-Avon, Henley-inArden division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4¾ miles (S. E. by S.) from Henley; containing 51 inhabitants. Somerville, the poet, was born here in the year 1692.

Edston, Great

EDSTON, GREAT, a parish, in the union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Kirkby-Moorside; containing, with the township of North Holme, 153 inhabitants, of whom 134 are in the township of Edston. The parish is situated on the river Dove, and comprises by computation 1100 acres, of which 746 are arable, and 204 meadow and pasture; the scenery is beautifully varied, and abounds with interesting features, embracing a fine view of Duncombe Park, and the borders of CastleHoward. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7.10.; net income, £188; patrons and impropriators, the family of Dowker. The church is a very small and ancient structure. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Edston, Little

EDSTON, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Sinnington, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 6¼ miles (W.) from Pickering; containing 15 inhabitants. It comprises about 800 acres of land, is bounded on the north-west by the river Dove, and situated to the south of the road from Kirkby-Moorside to Pickering.

Edvin-Loach

EDVIN-LOACH, a parish, in the union of Bromyard, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Hundred-House and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, though locally in the hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Bromyard; containing 62 inhabitants, and comprising 533a. 1r. 23p. Hops and fruit with other produce are grown here. The living is a discharged rectory, with the rectory of Tedstone-Wafer united, valued in the king's books at £2. 1. 10½., and in the gift of Edmund Higginson, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £80, and the glebe comprises 30 acres. The church lies in the south part of the parish, and is an ancient structure in the early and decorated English styles, with a wooden tower.

Edvin-Ralph

EDVIN-RALPH, a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Wolphy, though locally in the hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 2 miles (N.) from Bromyard; containing, with Butterley, 166 inhabitants. The parish is situated in a fertile district, abounding in romantic scenery; it consists of 1573 acres, and is intersected by the road from Bromyard to Tenbury. Limestone of good quality is extensively quarried for building, and for burning into lime. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 10½.; net income, £259; patron, W. L. Childe, Esq. The church is an ancient structure, containing several interesting monuments.

Edwalton (Holy Rood)

EDWALTON (Holy Rood), a parish, in the union of Bingham, N. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from Nottingham; containing 117 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement about 800 acres, of which about a fifth are pasture, and the rest arable; the surface is undulated, and the village pleasingly situated in a sequestered spot. A little more than sixty years ago the land was so boggy and indifferent, it could scarcely be let at any price; but it has been much improved, within the last twenty-five years especially, by draining and superior cultivation. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £97; patron and impropriator, John Musters, Esq. The church is an humble edifice of brick, with a rather clumsy tower.

Edwardston (St. Mary)

EDWARDSTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Cosford, hundred of Babergh, W. division of Suffolk, 1¾ mile (N. W.) from Boxford; containing 495 inhabitants, and consisting of about 1800 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.; patron, Charles Dawson, Esq.; appropriator, the Bishop of Ely, who pays the vicar £18. 5. per annum. The great tithes have been commuted for £373, and the vicarial for £263; the glebe comprises 8 acres. The church was given, with the tithes and other appurtenances, to the monastery of Abingdon, by Hubert de Montecheney, lord of the manor in 1114, when a society of Black monks was placed here, as a cell to that house; the site is now called St. Edward's Place. In 1160, the monks were removed to the priory of Colne, to which the parish church became appropriated, and belonged till the Dissolution.

Edwinstowe (St. Mary)

EDWINSTOWE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Southwell, Hatfield division of the hundred of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 1½ mile (W. by S.) from Ollerton; comprising the townships of Budby, Clipstone, and Edwinstowe, and the chapelries of Carburton, Ollerton, and Perlethorpe; and containing 2418 inhabitants, of whom 948 are in the township of Edwinstowe. The parish is situated on the road from Ollerton to Mansfield, and comprises all that remains of the ancient forest of Sherwood, so celebrated in legendary romance for the exploits of Robin Hood, who is said to have compelled Friar Tuck to celebrate the marriage of Allan-à-Dale with a wealthy heiress, in the church of this place. It comprehends some fine old woodland scenery and many modern plantations, with several open tracts of forest-land, which afford good pasture for sheep. The whole parish contains 16,827 acres, of which 5815 are in the township; about 2000 acres are inclosed in the beautiful park and pleasure-grounds of Thoresby Hall, the seat of Earl Manvers. It is traversed from west to east by the rivers Medin and Mann; and the village, which possesses much rural beauty, with the lofty spire of its church, forms an interesting feature in the landscape. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14; net income, £639; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. The church is a spacious ancient edifice, with a tower and an octagonal spire ornamented with canopied niches. There are chapels at Carburton, Ollerton, and Perlethorpe; and a place of worship for Wesleyans. The rent of 109 acres of land, £60 per annum, is distributed among the poor. Lady M. W. Montagu was born at Thoresby.

Edworth (St. George)

EDWORTH (St. George), a parish, in the union and hundred of Biggleswade, county of Bedford, 3¾ miles (S. E. by S.) from Biggleswade; containing 105 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 16. 3., and in the gift of W. Hall, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £240, and the glebe comprises 8 acres.

Effingham (St. Lawrence)

EFFINGHAM (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Dorking, hundred of Copthorne and Effingham, W. division of Surrey, 3¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Leatherhead; containing 581 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3100 acres, of which the north part is clay, the middle gravel, and the south chalk; there is a good deal of coppice land on the south side, chiefly oak, beech, and hazel. The village, from the discovery of numerous foundations of buildings in the contiguous fields, appears to have been formerly of much greater extent than it is at present. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 9., and in the patronage of the Crown: the impropriate tithes, belonging to the families of Stringer, Currie, and Malthus, have been commuted for £316, and the vicarial for £120; the glebe comprises 18 acres. The church contains several neat monuments; the east window is of stained glass, erected at the expense of Mr. Stringer.

Efford

EFFORD, a tything, in the parish of Milford, union of Ringwood, hundred of Christchurch, Ringwood and S. divisions of Hants, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Ringwood; containing 292 inhabitants.

Egbrough

EGBROUGH, a township, in the parish of Kellington, Lower division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 5¼ miles (W. by N.) from Snaith; containing 229 inhabitants, of whom 58 are in High, and 171 in Low, Egbrough. This township, situated on the road from Selby to Doncaster, includes the hamlet of Hut Green, and comprises about 1900 acres, of which the greater portion is the property of the family of Morritt, lords of the manor. A pleasurefair is held on Whit-Monday. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £108. 10., and the impropriate for £346, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Egbury

EGBURY, a tything, in the parish of Bourne, union of Caxton and Arrington, hundred of Longstow, county of Cambridge; with 131 inhabitants.

Egdean (St. Bartholomew)

EGDEAN (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Sutton (under Gilbert's act), hundred of Rotherbridge, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 2 miles (S. E.) from Petworth; containing 121 inhabitants. The parish comprises 710 acres, of which 62 are waste land or common; the road from Petworth to Brighton runs through it, and the Rother or Arundel navigation passes by its southern boundary. There are fairs on May 1st and Sept. 4th, for horses, horned-cattle, and sheep. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £1. 9. 2., and in the gift of A. G. W. Biddulph, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £110.



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