Elloughton - Elmsett

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

161-164

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'Elloughton - Elmsett', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 161-164. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50945 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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Elloughton (St. Mary)

ELLOUGHTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Beverley, Hunsley-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 2½ miles (S. E. by S.) from South Cave; containing, with the hamlet of Brough and township of Wauldby, 712 inhabitants. The parish comprises, exclusively of Wauldby, 1534a. 2r. 17p., and including that township 2312a. 35p.; of the former number 1161 acres are arable, 330 pasture, and 42 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 0. 5., and in the patronage of the Archbishop of York, with a net income of £114: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1794. The church is a very ancient structure; the greater portion of it fell down in the early part of the year 1843, but it has been since restored: it is in the early English style. There are places of worship for congregations of Calvinists and Wesleyans.

Ellsthorp

ELLSTHORP, a hamlet, in the parish of Edenham, union of Bourn, wapentake of Beltisloe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln; containing 68 inhabitants. It lies north of Edenham village.

Elm (All Saints)

ELM (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wisbech, Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Wisbech; containing 1742 inhabitants. The parish comprises 11,162a. 2r. 13p., of which 6522 acres are arable, 4615 pasture, and 25 plantations. The living is a sinecure rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 10., and now held by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; and a vicarage, with that of Emneth annexed, valued at £14. 15. 10.; patron, the Bishop of Ely. The rectorial tithes have been commuted for £1644. 15., and the vicarial for £638; the rectorial glebe comprises 18 acres, and the vicarial 2 acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style, and consists of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a tower surmounted by a small spire. Thomas Squire, in 1689, left a schoolroom, with a house and lands now producing about £50 a year; and the proceeds of about 34 acres bequeathed by different individuals, are distributed among the poor, who also receive in coal the sum of about £60 per annum, derived from land allotted in 1630. A tessellated pavement was discovered near the site of the old mansion of Needham Hall, which was taken down in 1804; and numerous Roman coins have been found.

Elm (St. Mary)

ELM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Frome, E. division of Somerset, 2¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Frome; containing 421 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Frome, and comprises by admeasurement 895 acres. The manufacture of woollen-cloth is extensively carried on in the vicinity; and on the banks of the Frome are various mills, and some manufactories of scythes, spades, reap-hooks, and other agricultural implements. Abundance of stone of good quality for building is found. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 13. 6½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Charles T. Griffith, D.D. The tithes have been commuted for £110, and the glebe comprises 134 acres. The church is an ancient structure with subsequent additions, and has a finely enriched Norman arch at the western entrance. Near the northern bank of a rivulet, and on the edge of a precipice, are the remains of a Roman intrenchment, called Tedbury, in which a vessel containing coins of the Lower Empire was found in 1691.

Elm, Little

ELM, LITTLE, a hamlet, partly in the parish of Elm, but chiefly in that of Whatley, union and hundred of Frome, E. division of the county of Somerset; containing 117 inhabitants.

Elmbridge

ELMBRIDGE, a chapelry, in the parish of Dodderhill, union of Droitwich, Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Droitwich and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 2¾ miles (N.) from Droitwich; containing 384 inhabitants. It comprises 1577 acres, of rather elevated and hilly land, principally arable, and of a rich and productive soil; and is bounded at the west end by the road from Droitwich to Kidderminster. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, and situated on an eminence, is a stone structure with a wooden spire, and has a very fine Saxon arch at the southern entrance; there are north and south aisles, and on the west is a gallery. The whole tithes belong to the vicar of Dodderhill.

Elmdon (St. Nicholas)

ELMDON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Saffron-Walden, hundred of Uttlesford, N. division of Essex, 5½ miles (W. by N.) from SaffronWalden; containing 680 inhabitants. The parish is situated near the confines of the county of Cambridge, and comprises 3197a. 3r. 18p., of which 153 acres are woodland; the surface is hilly, and the soil rests on chalk. The village is built on the declivities of two low hills, and has a picturesque appearance. The living is a vicarage, annexed to the rectory of Wendon-Lofts, and valued in the king's books at £19; impropriator, John Wilkes, Esq. The church is an ancient edifice with a square embattled tower. A Sunday school, in union with the National Society, is supported by a rentcharge of £14 per annum, bequeathed by Thomas Crawley in 1559.

Elmdon (St. Peter)

ELMDON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Solihull, Solihull division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 7 miles (S. E.) from Birmingham; containing 167 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1100 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, 20 acres woodland, and the remainder good meadow and pasture; the surface is varied, and the soil generally fertile. Elmdon Hall, erected in 1795 by Isaac Spooner, Esq., and beautifully situated, is now the mansion of W. C. Alston, Esq., who purchased the property in the year 1840. The Birmingham and Warwick canal, which communicates with the Grand Junction canal, skirts the parish; and the Hampton station of the London and Birmingham railway is about 2½ miles distant. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 8. 1½., and in the gift of Isaac William Spooner Lillingston, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £230, and the glebe comprises 18 acres of land. The church was erected in the year 1780, at the expense of Abraham Spooner, Esq., at a cost of £2000, and is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower: the east window is embellished with a representation of the Lord's Supper; and figures of Faith, Hope, and Charity, in stained glass, of ancient date; and the church contains monuments to the Spooner family for three generations, and one to Jane, Countess Dowager of Rosse, who died here in 1838. The parsonage-house was built in 1803.

Elmer, with Crakehill

ELMER, with Crakehill, a township, in the parish of Topcliffe, union of Thirsk, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 7 miles (N. by E.) from Boroughbridge; containing 93 inhabitants, of whom 56 are in Elmer. It is situated on the north side of the river Swale, and east of the road from Boroughbridge to Topcliffe; and comprises by computation 969 acres of land, of which about 300 are in Elmer: 62 are waste or common. The tithes have been commuted for £25. 8. payable to the vicar, and £147 to the Dean and Chapter of York.

Elmham, North (St. Mary)

ELMHAM, NORTH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Launditch, W. division of Norfolk, 5¼ miles (N.) from East Dereham; containing 1219 inhabitants. On the division of the kingdom of the East Angles, which from its first conversion by Felix had been under one bishop, into two dioceses, about the year 673, one of the episcopal seats was fixed at Dunwich, and the other in this ancient town, which had a succession of ten bishops, till the martyrdom of Humbert by the Danes in 870. The sees were again united about 950, and the episcopal chair transferred to Thetford in 1075. Herbert, first bishop of Norwich, rebuilt the parish church, but the present seems to be of later date: from the altar ran a subterranean passage to a palace, situated on a neighbouring hill, and which Bishop Spencer, in the turbulent reign of Richard II., converted into a castle, and surrounded with a double intrenchment, the inner moat inclosing the keep; the moats remain, and there are some vestiges of the keep. The parish comprises 4623a. 2r., of which 2826 acres are arable, 1493 pasture, and 286 woodland and plantations; the village is pleasantly situated on the west bank of the river Wensum, and is spacious and well built. Petty-sessions are held on the first Wednesday in every alternate month; and fairs for cattle, sheep, and swine, on the 6th of April. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 15.; patron and impropriator, Lord Sondes: the great tithes have been commuted for £377. 7. 6., and the vicarial for £462, and the glebe comprises 16½ acres. The church is a cruciform structure, with a lofty tower surmounted by a slender spire, and is chiefly in the decorated and later English styles; remains exist of a beautiful screen, on the lower compartments of which are representations of saints, &c. There is a place of worship for Independents; also a school in union with the National Society, endowed with 13 acres of land. Various Roman urns, coins, and other relics, have been found.

Elmham, South (All Saints)

ELMHAM, SOUTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (N. W.) from Halesworth; containing 224 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 1300 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of St. Nicholas annexed, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of Sir R. S. Adair: the tithes have been commuted for £368, and the glebe comprises 21 acres. The church is an ancient structure, originally Norman, of which style the circular tower, with a beautiful arch at the southern entrance, still remains; the other parts have been rebuilt at various dates, and are in the early and later English styles.

Elmham, South, St. Cross (St. George)

ELMHAM, SOUTH, ST. CROSS (St. George), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 4 miles (E. by N.) from Harleston; containing 258 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1043 acres, of which 100 are common land or waste. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to the rectory of Homersfield, and valued in the king's books at £10: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £23. 6. 8., and the rectorial for £191. 13. 4.; the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church was repaired in 1840, and is in the decorated and later English styles, with a square embattled tower; the altar-piece is a good painting of the Raising of Lazarus from the Dead: at the south entrance is an enriched Norman arch. Near St. Margaret's Hall are the remains of a religious house, surrounded with a moat.

Elmham, South (St. James)

ELMHAM, SOUTH (St. James), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 5½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Halesworth; containing 289 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of W. Adair, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £377, and the glebe comprises 10 acres. The church is an ancient structure, partly in the early and partly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. Here are the remains of some ancient buildings, called the Minster. Dr. Rouke, master of Magdalene College, Oxford, was a native of the place.

Elmham, South (St. Margaret)

ELMHAM, SOUTH (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (E.) from Harleston; containing 181 inhabitants. This was formerly the residence of the bishops of Norwich, who had a palace here, erected about the same time as the cathedral, and which was subsequently a convent of Benedictine monks: the remains of the chapel form an interesting ruin. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of St. Peter's annexed, valued in the king's books at £6. 2. 11., and in the patronage of W. Adair, Esq.: the tithes of the parish have been commuted for £125. 1. 6., of which £121. 1. 6. are payable to the rector, who has 52 acres of glebe. The church is partly in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower, and a Norman arched doorway on the south side. Estates producing £70 per annum are vested in trustees for charitable uses.

Elmham, South (St. Michael)

ELMHAM, SOUTH (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of the county of Suffolk, 6 miles (N. N. W.) from Halesworth; containing 145 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to the perpetual curacy of Rumburgh, and valued in the king's books at £4. 17. 11. The church is in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower, and an enriched Norman arch at the south entrance.

Elmham, South (St. Nicholas)

ELMHAM, SOUTH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of the county of Suffolk, 6¼ miles (N. W.) from Halesworth; containing 90 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to the rectory of All Saints', and valued in the king's books at £6: the church has been long since demolished.

Elmham, South (St. Peter)

ELMHAM, SOUTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of the county of Suffolk, 3¾ miles (S.) from Bungay; containing 91 inhabitants, and comprising 562a. 2r. 33p. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of St. Margaret's, and valued in the king's books at £8: the tithes have been commuted for £138, and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church is an ancient structure, in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower. There are still considerable remains of St. Peter's Hall, formerly the seat of the Tasburghs, who removed to Flixton Hall; the house is now occupied by a farmer.

Elmhurst.—See Curborough.

ELMHURST.—See Curborough.

Elmley, county of York.—See Emley.

ELMLEY, county of York.—See Emley.

Elmley Castle (St. Mary)

ELMLEY CASTLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Pershore, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Pershore; containing 403 inhabitants. This place takes its name from a castle erected on one of the Bredon hills, at the time of the Conquest, and which was destroyed in the reign of Henry III.; who gave to the inhabitants a weekly market, and an annual fair on the festival of St. Lawrence. A chantry or college, for eight priests, was subsequently founded here by Grey Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, in honour of the Virgin Mary. The parish comprises 2040a. 2r. 31p., and is partly bounded on the south by Gloucestershire: nearly one-half of the surface is on the brow of the hill, and has a light but fertile soil; in the vale, the soil is a stiff wet clay. Great varieties of fossil shells are found. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 5½.; net income, £112; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Worcester. The church, which stands on the south side of the village, is an ancient edifice with a vaulted roof; it contains some handsome monuments to the Savage family, and one to an earl of Coventry, erected by the countess, his widow. The site of the ancient castle, and the moat by which it was surrounded, are all that remain. Bishop Bonner is said to have been born here. The place gives the inferior title of Viscount to the Earl Beauchamp.

Elmley, Isle of (St. James)

ELMLEY, ISLE of (St. James), a parish, in the union of Sheppy, liberty of the Isle of Sheppy, Upper division of the lathe of Scray, E. division of Kent, 3 miles (N. N. E.) from Sittingbourne; containing 42 inhabitants. This place, still called an island, was formerly surrounded by the river Swale, but is now connected by a narrow neck of land with the Isle of Sheppy; it is in length about three miles, and in breadth two, a small tract on the northern side being within the bounds of the parish of East Church. There is a ferry across the Swale to Milton. The parish comprises 1572 acres of rich land, affording herbage for numerous flocks of sheep; also 189 acres of marsh land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5; net income, £340; patrons, the Warden and Fellows of All Souls' College, Oxford. The church, which was dilapidated, and only used on the induction of a new rector, has lately been repaired, and divine service is now performed in it.

Elmley-Lovett (St. Michael)

ELMLEY-LOVETT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Droitwich, Lower division of the hundred of Halfshire, Kidderminster and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Stourport, containing 381 inhabitants. The parish is intersected at its east end by the road from Droitwich to Kidderminster, and crossed from north to south by a stream which falls into the Salwarp. It consists of 2179 acres of a rich and fertile soil, and 205 of common land or waste; the surface is rather hilly, and interspersed with wood. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 2. 6.; net income, £527; patron, Christ's College, Cambridge. The church, which stands on elevated ground, has been lately built, on the site of the former edifice. A school is endowed with part of the profits of an estate which was bequeathed, at a very early period, for the benefit of the church and the poor, and now produces a rental of £131. 14. The place gives the title of Viscount to the Lygon family.

Elmore

ELMORE, a hamlet, in the parish of Motcomb, union of Shaftesbury, liberty of Gillingham, Shaston division of Dorset, ½ a mile (N.) from Shaftesbury. A church has lately been erected, chiefly at the expense of the Earl of Pembroke and his family. On Elmore Green are several wells, from which the town of Shaftesbury is supplied with water.

Elmore (St. John the Baptist)

ELMORE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Gloucester, Middle division of the hundred of Dudstone and King's-Barton, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6½ miles (W. S. W.) from Gloucester; containing 379 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Severn, and comprises about 1200 acres: the soil is generally a deep clay, and the surface flat; the greater portion of the land is meadow and pasture. The Severn is here obstructed in its course by a rock extending nearly across its channel, which renders it unnavigable at low water. Elmore Court, the ancient seat of the Guise family, is a handsome Elizabethan mansion, on an eminence. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £73; patron, Sir Berkeley W. Guise, Bart. The church has an embattled tower at the west end.

Elmsall, North

ELMSALL, NORTH, a township, in the parish of South Kirkby, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 6¾ miles (S. by E.) from Pontefract; containing 281 inhabitants. It comprises about 2000 acres; the surface is boldly undulated, and the scenery pleasing. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £80.

Elmsall, South

ELMSALL, SOUTH, a township, in the parish of South Kirkby, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 7¾ miles (S. by E.) from Pontefract; containing 518 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1370 acres; the village consists of several scattered houses, extending along an acclivity near the confluence of the two sources of the Skelbrook river.

Elmsett (St. Peter)

ELMSETT (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Cosford, W. division of Suffolk, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Hadleigh; containing 446 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1997a. 1r. 10p.: the surface is diversified with hills and dales; the soil is various, and the lands are arable, pasture, and meadow, in nearly equal portions, with a moderate quantity of wood. Two streams, which rise within the parish, flow in different directions; and there are two large gravel-pits. A pleasure-fair is held on Whit-Tuesday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 7. 1.; net income, £580; patrons, the Master, Fellows, and Scholars of Clare Hall, Cambridge. The church is built of flint and stone; the chancel window is much admired. The parsonage-house is surrounded by a moat. On the declivity of a hill is a cold mineral spring, called the Dropping Well, issuing out of limestone rock, and producing fibrous crystallizations. John Boyse, an eminent scholar and divine, and one of the translators of the last version of the Bible, was born here in 1560.