Faccombe - Falkenham

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

206-209

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'Faccombe - Falkenham', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 206-209. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50954 Date accessed: 25 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Faccombe (St. Michael)

FACCOMBE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Andover, hundred of Pastrow, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 8½ miles (N. by E.) from Andover; containing 276 inhabitants. It comprises 2542 acres; the surface is very hilly, and the soil on the hills is a strong clayey loam, with large boulders of stone, and in the lower grounds chalky and flinty. The living is a rectory, with that of Tangley annexed, valued in the king's books at £26. 2. 3½.; net income, £695; patron, the Rev. Mr. Everet. The church contains some ancient monuments to the Lucys, of the county of Warwick. The Wesleyans have a place of worship; and there is a small national school. The Wansdyke, or Wodensdyke, supposed to have been one of the boundaries during the heptarchy, passes through the parish.

Faceby

FACEBY, a chapelry, in the parish of Whorlton, union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 4½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Stokesley; containing 145 inhabitants. This place appears from Domesday book to have been an inheritance of the crown, and soon after the Conquest was granted by the king to Robert de Brus, lord of Skelton, with whose family it continued for some time, until, male issue failing, the estate passed to the family of de Roos, and thence to the Thwengs, Nevilles, and others. It is in the district called Cleveland, and situated on a branch of the river Leven, near the road from Stokesley to Thirsk, and on the eastern side of Whorl Hill. The chapelry comprises by computation 1370 acres; a considerable portion of the land was undivided common till about 1749, when it was inclosed. The village is small, and irregularly built. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of G. W. Sutton, Esq., with a net income of £52: the chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, is a plain edifice.

Fadiley

FADILEY, a township, in the parish of Acton, union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 4¾ miles (W. by N.) from Nantwich; containing 320 inhabitants. This place was anciently esteemed an appendage of the manor of Baddiley, but the owners of Woodhey here had, at an early period, a manor which became vested in the earls of Dysart, by the marriage of the coheiress of Sir Thomas Wilbraham with Lionel, Lord Huntingtower, in 1680. The township comprises 1200 acres; the soil is clay and sand. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £78. 16. 8., and the vicarial for £25. 14. 2. A domestic chapel was built at Woodhey by the relict of Sir Thomas Wilbraham, who, in 1703, endowed it with a rent-charge of £25. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Fadmoor

FADMOOR, a township, in the parish of KirkbyMoorside, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 2 miles (N.) from Kirkby-Moorside; containing 176 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2010 acres of land.

Failand

FAILAND, a tything, in the parish of Portbury, union of Bedminster, hundred of Portbury, E. division of Somerset; containing 35 inhabitants.

Failand

FAILAND, a tything, in the parish of Wraxall, union of Bedminster, hundred of Portbury, E. division of Somerset; containing 293 inhabitants.

Failsworth

FAILSWORTH, a township, in the parish of Manchester, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 4¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Manchester; containing 3879 inhabitants. The cotton manufacture is carried on in this as in the neighbouring townships. The village lies on the road from Manchester to Oldham; and remains of a Roman road exist. A church district was endowed in 1844 by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners; the living is in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Chester, alternately. The first stone of a church, St. John's, was laid in August, 1845, and the building was consecrated in Nov. 1846; it is in the early English style, cost £2400, and contains 807 sittings, whereof three-fourths are free. The dissenters have a place of worship in the township; and there is a national school.

Fairburn

FAIRBURN, a township, in the parish of Ledsham, union of Preston (under Gilbert's act), Upper division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 2¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Ferry-Bridge; containing 523 inhabitants. This township, which is situated on the river Aire, comprises about 1380 acres, chiefly the property of Lord Palmerston, who is lord of the manor. The substratum abounds with limestone and alabaster, both of which are quarried to a great extent; kilns have been erected for burning the limestone, and large quantities of lime are sent to various places in the surrounding district. A tunnel 305 yards long has been formed, which extends under the village to the canal communicating with the river Aire. The York and North-Midland railway passes through the place, in an excavation 48 feet in depth, and nearly three-quarters of a mile in length. A church, St. James the Apostle's, was consecrated in Nov. 1846; it is a stone edifice, with some windows of stained glass, but is otherwise a plain and unpretending building. Tithe rent-charges have been awarded amounting to £422. 10., of which £121 are payable to the vicar, and £301. 10. to the Dean and Chapter of York.

Fairfield

FAIRFIELD, a chapelry, in the parish of Hope, union of Chapel-en-le-Frith, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 1 mile (E. N. E.) from Buxton; containing 599 inhabitants. It is separated from Buxton by the river Wye, and comprises 3914a. 2r. 32p., of which 3377 acres are meadow and pasture, 251 arable, 178 woodland, and 107 water, roads, and waste. The living is a donative curacy; net income, £79; patrons, certain Trustees; impropriator, the Duke of Devonshire, whose tithes have been commuted for £101, those of the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield for £12, and the vicarial for £2. The chapel, dedicated to St. Peter, and rebuilt in 1839, is in the early English style. A school is endowed with £39 per annum.

Fairfield (St. Thomas à Becket,)

FAIRFIELD (St. Thomas à Becket,) a parish, in the union of Romney-Marsh, hundred of Aloesbridge, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 6¾ miles (W. by N.) from New Romney; containing 68 inhabitants. It comprises 1203 acres, of which 45 are marsh. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £57; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Canterbury Cathedral.

Fairfield, Lancaster.—See Droylsden.

FAIRFIELD, Lancaster.—See Droylsden.

Fairfield-Head, or Fawfield-Head

FAIRFIELD-HEAD, or Fawfield-Head, a township, in the parish of Alstonfield, union of Leek, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 7½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Leek; containing 991 inhabitants. This is the largest township of the parish: it contains the hamlets of Fairfield-Head, Hulme-Head, Reaps-Moor, Newtown, and Wigginstall; and a number of scattered houses in the vales of the Dove and Manyfold. Beresford Hall, an ancient mansion now partly in ruins, stands on the west bank of the Dove, about two miles above Alstonfield, and is celebrated as the birthplace of Charles Cotton, the poet, the contemporary and friend of Isaak Walton. The Beresford Hall estate gives the title of Viscount to William Carr Beresford, general in the army, and Duke of Elvas, in Portugal, whose family has possessed this manor from the time of the Conquest.

Fairford (Virgin Mary)

FAIRFORD (Virgin Mary), a market-town and parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of Brightwell's-Barrow, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 24 miles (S. E. by E.) from Gloucester, and 80 (W. by N.) from London; containing 1672 inhabitants. This place derives its name from the convenience of its ford across the Colne, on which river it is situated, near its influx into the Thames. About the middle of the ninth century, the manor belonged to the kings of Mercia; at the period of the Norman survey, to Maud, consort of William I.; and after various changes it came into the possession of Henry VII. The town, which is on the road from London to Stroud, and also on that from Oxford to Bath, consists principally of one long street, irregularly formed; there are several good detached houses, and its general appearance has been much improved of late: the inhabitants are supplied with water from springs, and from the Colne, across which are two neat bridges. The manufacture of agricultural implements is carried on to a considerable extent. A market is held on Thursday, by charter obtained about 1668; and there are fairs for cattle and sheep on May 14th and November 12th. The parish comprises 3803 acres by measurement. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 11. 5½.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Gloucester: the tithes have been commuted for £482. The church is an elegant and spacious structure in the later English style, with a central embattled tower, strengthened by panelled buttresses, enriched with canopied niches, in which were statues, and crowned by crocketed pinnacles; the windows of the church are all of stained glass, and the whole edifice is one of the richest specimens of its style. The erection is attributed to John Tame, a rich London merchant, who, in trading to Italy about 1492, captured a Flemish vessel bound for Rome, on board of which was a quantity of splendid stained glass: having purchased the manor, he commenced building the church in 1493, and his death taking place in 1500, it was finished by his son, Sir Edmund Tame, Knt. There are places of worship for Baptists and Independents. A bequest of £1000 was made in 1704, by the Hon. Elizabeth Farmor, daughter of Lord Lempster, to be expended in land, for the maintenance of an afternoon lecture every Sunday in the church, and for the foundation and support of a free school. The school is also endowed with a subsequent bequest of £500 by her cousin, Mrs. Mary Barker, besides other benefactions; the schoolroom was erected in 1738. Fairford gives the title of Viscount to the Marquess of Downshire.

Fairhaugh

FAIRHAUGH, a township, in the parish of Allenton, union of Rothbury, W. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 13 miles (N. N. W.) from Rothbury; containing 5 inhabitants. It lies on the Usway burn, north of the Coquet river; the soil, which is generally poor, is covered with heath.

Fairlight (St. Andrew)

FAIRLIGHT (St. Andrew), a parish, in the hundred of Guestling, union and rape of Hastings, E. division of Sussex, 3 miles (E. N. E.) from Hastings; containing 631 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2865 acres, of which 300 are waste land or common. The village occupies a hollow, near the coast of the English Channel; and the Royal Military canal terminates here. From Fairlight Downs, the highest point of which is 599 feet above the level of the sea, the views are beautiful and extensive; and in the grounds of Fairlight Place is a picturesque glen, which, with the Lover's Seat, a romantic spot overlooking the sea, is much resorted to by visiters from Hastings and St. Leonard's. Good sandstone, used for building, is found in most parts of the parish. The living is a vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £6. 9. 2., and in the gift of B. Pearse, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £633. 15., and the glebe comprises 20 acres, with a very handsome and spacious parsonagehouse, erected in the Tudor style, in 1839. The church, an unpretending structure in the early English style, was built in 1845: the former edifice was destroyed.

Fairstead (St. Mary)

FAIRSTEAD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Witham, N. division of Essex, 4 miles (W. N. W.) from Witham; containing 306 inhabitants. This parish, which derives its name from the pleasantness of its situation and the beauty of the surrounding scenery, comprises about 1800 acres, whereof about 300 are woodland and pasture, and the remainder arable; a considerable portion is heavy and wet, and the substratum a whitish clayey marl. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Bishop of London: the tithes have been commuted for £479, and the glebe comprises 74 acres. The church is a small ancient edifice, with a tower of stone surmounted by a tall shingled spire, and contains several monuments, among which is one to Sir Antony Maxey and his lady, whose effigies in a kneeling posture are well sculptured.

Faith, St., Hampshire.—See Winchester.

FAITH, ST., Hampshire.—See Winchester.

Fakenham (St. Peter)

FAKENHAM (St. Peter), a market-town and parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 25½ miles (N. W.) from Norwich, and 109 (N. N. E.) from London; containing 2158 inhabitants. This town, anciently called FakenhamLancaster, is pleasantly situated on a declivity north of the river Wensum, and has of late years been considerably improved by the erection of several neat houses; the streets are paved with flint stone: the inhabitants are plentifully supplied with water from springs. There are a brewery and malting establishment, and a flourmill, upon the Wensum. The market is on Thursday, for corn and cattle, and is well attended by dealers from a considerable distance: fairs, principally for cattle, are held on Hempton Green, about one mile from the town, on Whit-Tuesday, and November 22nd. Petty-sessions are held on the last Monday in the month, and courts leet and baron for the manor annually. The parish comprises 2016a. 5p., whereof 1636 acres are arable, 240 pasture and meadow, and 140 heath; it includes the hamlet of Alethorpe, formerly a parish, in which are 240 acres, and Thorpland, also anciently a parish, in which are slight remains of the church. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £35. 6. 8.: net income, £862; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge: the glebe consists of 78½ acres. The church is a handsome structure, chiefly in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower crowned by crocketed pinnacles; the interior contains some rich details. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. Miss Ann Harrison bequeathed in 1794 the sum of £1666. 13. in the three per cent. consolidated Bank annuities, the interest to be distributed in coal, blankets, &c., to the poor.

Fakenham Magna (St. Peter)

FAKENHAM MAGNA (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Thetford, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 5 miles (S. S. E.) from Thetford; containing 213 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 10. 5., and in the gift of the Duke of Grafton: the tithes have been commuted for £276. 19. 9., and the glebe comprises 32 acres.

Fakenham Parva (St. Andrew), in the county of Suffolk.—See Euston.

FAKENHAM PARVA (St. Andrew), in the county of Suffolk.—See Euston.

Falcutt

FALCUTT, a hamlet, in the parish of Wappenham, union of Towcester, hundred of King's-Sutton, S. division of the county of Northampton; containing 82 inhabitants.

Faldingworth (All Saints)

FALDINGWORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 5 miles (S. W.) from Market-Rasen; containing 350 inhabitants. It is on the road from Market-Rasen to Lincoln, and comprises 2400 acres; the soil is generally clayey. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 8. 1½.; net income, £330; patron, Earl Brownlow: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1794. The church was rebuilt in 1818, the previous structure having been destroyed in that year by a very high wind. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Falfield

FALFIELD, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Thornbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 4 miles (N. E. by E.) from Thornbury, and on the road from Gloucester to Bristol; containing 424 inhabitants.

Falkenham (St. Ethelbert)

FALKENHAM (St. Ethelbert), a parish, in the union of Woodbridge, hundred of Colneis, E. division of Suffolk, 11 miles (E. S. E.) from Ipswich; containing 290 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north-east by the river Deben, which is navigable to Woodbridge; and comprises about 1400 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with all tithes except those of barley, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 3., and in the patronage of the Crown: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £75, and the vicarial for £370; the glebe comprises 23 acres. There is a dissenters' meeting-house.