Folkingham - Fordham

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

248-250

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'Folkingham - Fordham', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 248-250. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50967 Date accessed: 27 August 2014.


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Folkingham.—See Falkingham.

FOLKINHGAM.—See Falkingham.

Folkington (St. Peter)

FOLKINGTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Eastbourne, hundred of Longbridge, rape of Pevensey, E. division of Sussex, 18 miles (S. S. E.) from Uckfield; containing 198 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Lewes to Eastbourne, comprises about 1450 acres: the surface is hilly, and from the higher grounds are some of the finest views in the county; the soil is chalky. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the gift of Earl Delawarr: the tithes have been commuted for £200, and the glebe comprises 10 acres. The church is in the early English style, with later insertions, and contains good monuments to Sir William and Lesley Thomas, formerly proprietors of the manor. Three almshouses, founded by Sir William, were re-established by his descendant, the late W. Harison, Esq. On the downs above the village are two large barrows.

Folksworth (St. Helen)

FOLKSWORTH (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Peterborough, hundred of Norman-Cross, county of Huntingdon, 1 mile (N. W. by W.) from Stilton; containing 186 inhabitants. It is situated near the north road: the soil is generally clay, and the surface level. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 3.; net income, £135; patron, the Rev. H. Freeman: the glebe consists of about 110 acres. The church is an ancient edifice.

Folkton (St. John the Evangelist)

FOLKTON (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union of Scarborough, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York; containing, with the township of Flixton, 580 inhabitants, of whom 251 are in the township of Folkton, 3 miles (N. W.) from Hunmanby. The parish comprises by computation 2500 acres: the village, which is neatly built, is situated in a pleasant valley on the northern side of the Wolds. The living is a rectory and vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 11. 10½.; net income, £900; patron, Capt. Robert Mitford, R.N.: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1802. The church is an ancient structure, with a low tower.

Follyfoot

FOLLYFOOT, a township, in the parish of Spofforth, Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Wetherby; containing 353 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1990 acres; and includes the beautiful demesne of Rudding Park, and part of the hamlet of Spacey-Houses. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Fonaby

FONABY, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 17 inhabitants, and comprising 628 acres.

Fonthill, Bishop's (All Saints)

FONTHILL, BISHOP'S (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Tisbury, hundred of Downton, locally in the hundred of Mere, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 1½ mile (E. by N.) from Hindon; containing 207 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from London to Exeter, and comprises 1729 acres, of which 552 are waste or common: of the cultivated lands, twothirds are arable, and the rest pasture and wood; the soil is light and gravelly, and in many parts chalk abounds. The surface is beautifully varied with hill and dale; it is diversified by woods, chiefly of beech and elm, and in Fonthill Park, the seat of James Morrison, Esq., is a lake a mile in length. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £258, and the glebe comprises about 4½ acres. The church is principally in the early English style, with an old Norman tower. Samuel Gattrell in 1817 left a dividend of £10. 10., for a school.

Fonthill, Gifford (St. Nicholas)

FONTHILL, GIFFORD (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Tisbury, hundred of Dunworth, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 1¾ mile (S. E.) from Hindon; containing 416 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 10., and in the gift of the Lord of the Manor: the tithes have been commuted for £310, and there are 40 acres of glebe. In this parish was the magnificent mansion belonging to William Beckford, Esq., called Fonthill Abbey.

Fontmell Magna (St. Andrew)

FONTMELL MAGNA (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Shaftesbury, hundred of SixpennyHandley, Shaston division of Dorset, 4¼ miles (S.) from Shaftesbury; containing, with the chapelry of Hartgrove, 876 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2853 acres, of which 441 are waste land or common. The cottagers are employed in the manufacture of wire-buttons; and a customary fair is held in the village on the 9th of June, but is growing into disuse. The living consists of a rectory and vicarage, with the living of West Orchard annexed, the rectory valued in the king's books at £18, and the vicarage at £7. 10.; it is in the patronage of Mrs. Salkeld: the tithes have been commuted for £550, and the glebe comprises 30 acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Foolow

FOOLOW, a township, in the parish of Eyam, union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 2¾ miles (E. by N.) from Tideswell; containing 249 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £34. 2., and the glebe contains 12½ acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Foot's-Cray.—See Cray, Foot's.

FOOT'S-CRAY.—See Cray, Foot's.

Forcett

FORCETT, a parochial chapelry, in the union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York; consisting of the townships of Barforth, Carkin, Eppleby, Forcett, and Ovington; and containing 656 inhabitants, of whom 123 are in the township of Forcett, 9 miles (E. by S.) from Darlington. It comprises by computation 6200 acres, of which 1710 are in Forcett township; the surface is pleasing, the soil rich, and there are several valuable quarries of limestone and freestone. Forcett Hall, the seat of Mr. Michell, is a noble and elegant building in an extensive park; and in front of the mansion, to the south, is a piece of water which extends over 22 or 23 acres: on the estate are also numerous plantations. The chapel, dedicated to St. Cuthbert, is a neat edifice, with a tower, and an east window embellished with stained glass: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Gilling. In Forcett Park are traces of British intrenchments which extend eastward to Stanwick.

Ford

FORD, a hamlet, in the parish of Dinton, union and hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 4 miles (S. S. W.) from Aylesbury; containing 221 inhabitants. Here was formerly a chapel.

Ford, with Bidstone.—See Bidstone.

FORD, with Bidstone.—See Bidstone

Ford

FORD, a hamlet, in the parish of North Wingfield, union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby. The celebrated nonconformist divine, William Bagshaw, called the Apostle of the Peak, was a native of this place.

Ford

FORD, a township and chapelry, in the parish of Bishop-Wearmouth, union of Sunderland, N. division of Easington ward and of the county of Durham, 3½ miles (W.) from Sunderland; containing 1720 inhabitants. This township is on the Wear, and comprises the scattered village of South Hylton, on the southern bank of the river, over which is a ferry to the village of North Hylton, situated within the limits of the parish of Monk-Wearmouth. Ford House is a handsome mansion, among thriving plantations; and the adjacent scenery is of pleasing character. Ironstone of a blueish colour is quarried to a considerable extent. At South Hylton are several yards for ship-building, a paper-mill, some copperas-works, and an extensive manufactory of earthenware, chiefly for exportation to Germany. The chapel, situated at South Hylton, was erected and endowed by Capt. Maling, in 1817: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the family of Gray; net income, £140. There are places of worship for Primitive and Associated Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Ford, with Orrell.—See Orrell.

FORD, with Orrell.—See Orrell.

Ford (St. Michael)

FORD (St. Michael), a parish, in the union, and W. division of the ward, of Glendale, N. division of Northumberland, 9 miles (N. N. W.) from Wooler; containing 2257 inhabitants. On the western side of the village is Ford Castle, erected in 1287 by Sir William Heron, and rebuilt by the late Lord Delaval; two towers, the remains of the former castle, are retained in the present structure. The castle was demolished by the Scots in 1385, under the Earls of Fife, March, and Douglas; prior to the battle of Flodden, it was captured by James IV.'s troops; and in 1549 it was again taken by the Scots, who destroyed a great part of it. The parish contains a considerable quantity of coal, limestone, whinstone, freestone, and slate. Courts leet and baron are held about Easter. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24; patron, the Marquess of Waterford. There are places of worship for Baptists and Presbyterians, and several charity schools. Flodden-Field, in the parish, was the scene of the celebrated battle fought on the 9th of Sept. 1513, by the Scots under James IV., and the English commanded by the Earl of Surrey, the former of whom were defeated, and their king slain; the top of the hill is now covered with fir-trees. As some workmen were digging in a field near Flodden, in 1810, they discovered a large pit filled with human bones.

Ford, Foord, or Fordsholme (St. Michael)

FORD, Foord, or Fordsholme (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Atcham, hundred of Ford, S. division of Salop, 4¾ miles (W. by N.) from Shrewsbury; containing 309 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the north by the river Severn, and intersected by the road from Shrewsbury to Aberystwith, comprises about 900 acres; the soil is light and fertile, and the surface generally undulated. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; net income, £91; patron and impropriator, George Tomline, Esq. The Roman Watling-street runs through the parish.

Ford

FORD, a parish, in the hundred of Avisford, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 5½ miles (S. S. W.) from Arundel; containing 70 inhabitants. It is bounded on the east by the river Arun, and comprises 470 computed acres; the surface is level, and the soil for the greater part rich. The Portsmouth and Arundel canal, commencing from the river Arun, passes through the parish, and is supplied with water from that stream by a steam-engine erected for the purpose. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Bishop of Chichester: the tithes have been commuted for £235, and the glebe comprises one acre. The church is principally in the decorated English style.

Ford

FORD, a tything, partly in the parishes of Idmiston and Laverstock, union and hundred of Alderbury, and partly in the district of Milford, parish of St. Martin (Salisbury), hundred of Underditch, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 107 inhabitants.

Fordhall

FORDHALL, a hamlet, in the chapelry of Ullenhall, parish of Wootton-Wawen, union of Stratford-on-Avon, Henley division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick; containing 126 inhabitants.

Fordham (St. Mary)

FORDHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newmarket, hundred of Staploe, county of Cambridge, 5½ miles (N.) from Newmarket; containing 1416 inhabitants. James I., when coursing in the parish, took refreshment at a place still called "the King's Path," and killed a hare near the spot; which circumstance is commemorated upon a beam in the church, by a carved representation of two greyhounds pursuing a hare. The parish comprises by measurement 4050 acres, chiefly arable, with a very small portion of pasture and woodland; the soil is of rather inferior quality, and the surface in some parts flat. A stream flows through the lands, and gives motion to two mills. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £348; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Jesus College, Cambridge; appropriator, the Bishop of Ely: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1809; the land comprises about 270 acres. The church is a neat edifice. The Independents have a place of worship; and there are six almshouses for widows, erected by Thomas Hinson in 1626. A small Gilbertine priory was founded in the reign of Henry III., by Sir Robert de Fordham, as a cell to the great monastery of the same order at Sempringham, in Lincolnshire; but scarcely a vestige remains.

Fordham, or Great Fordham (All Saints)

FORDHAM, or Great Fordham (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 6 miles (N. W. by W.) from Colchester; containing 739 inhabitants. The parish is separated from that of Aldham by the river Colne, and comprises 2517 acres, of which 2083 are arable, 112 pasture, 60 woodland, and 50 heath; the land lies high, and the soil is a loam, mixed with gravel. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 4. 2., and in the gift alternately of Earl de Grey, and C. S. Onley, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £750, and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church, an ancient edifice with a tower surmounted by a wooden spire, is pleasantly situated on an eminence, and contains some monuments. William Ellis, in 1791, bequeathed £10 per annum for instruction.

Fordham

FORDHAM, a parish, in the union of Downham, hundred of Clackclose, W. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (S.) from Downham; containing 219 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south by the river Wissey, and intersected by the Ouse, which also forms part of its western boundary; it comprises 2204a. 3r. 27p., whereof 1733 acres are arable, 380 meadow and pasture, and 40 woodland. Snore Hall, now a farmhouse, was the seat of the family of Skipwith, who entertained Charles I. on the night previous to his delivering himself to the Scottish army. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £51; patron, E. R. Pratt, Esq., who, and the Dean and Chapter of Norwich, are impropriators. The impropriate and the rectorial tithes have each been commuted for £231, and the rectorial glebe comprises 13 acres. The church is in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and appears to have been of larger dimensions.