Froggatt - Fulbrook

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

269-272

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'Froggatt - Fulbrook', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 269-272. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50974 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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Froggatt

FROGGATT, a township, in the parish and union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 2 miles (N. E. by E.) from Stony-Middleton; containing 136 inhabitants.

Frog-Street, with Stapleton

FROG-STREET, with Stapleton, a township, in the parish and union of Presteign, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford; with 155 inhabitants.

Frome, or Frome-Selwood (St. Peter)

FROME, or Frome-Selwood (St. Peter), a market-town, parish, and newly-enfranchised borough, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Frome, E. division of Somerset, 25 miles (N. E.) from Ilchester, and 105 (W. by S.) from London; containing 11,849 inhabitants. This place takes its name from the river called by the Saxons Frau, now Frome, which, passing by the town, runs into the Avon near Bradford; and its adjunct of Selwood from its situation in an ancient and extensive forest. A monastery was founded here in 705, and dedicated to St. John the Baptist, by Aldhelm, afterwards Bishop of Sherborne: it was plundered in the Danish wars, and the monks were dispersed, but the church continued till the middle of the 12th century; and the remains, with those of a chapel belonging to a small nunnery dedicated to St. Catherine, have been converted into tenements for the poor. The town is pleasantly situated on the north-east declivity of a hill, and consists of a great number of streets, for the most part irregularly built, and some of them inconveniently narrow, but tolerably clean. A new opening through the town was made a few years since, forming a very handsome street, with good houses on each side. The buildings in general are constructed of small rough stone, and roofed with stone dug in the neighbourhood; the inhabitants are well supplied with water, and the town has a commodious market-house. Over the Frome, which abounds with excellent trout and eels, is a neat stone bridge of five arches. The environs are pleasant, and contain the handsome seats of Longleat, Orchardleigh, Berkley, Mells Park, Babington, Ammerdown, Standerwick, and Marston.

Frome has long been celebrated for its woollen manufacture, of which the principal articles are broadcloths and kerseymeres, of very superior quality; the manufacture of wool-cards is also carried on to a large extent, and formerly they were supplied from this place to almost every town in England. The beer brewed here is in high repute, and is usually kept to a great age. An act was passed in 1845 for a railway from near Chippenham, by Frome, to Weymouth. The principal market is on Wednesday; there is a smaller one on Saturday, and fairs are held on February 24th and November 25th, for cattle and cheese. By the act of the 2nd of William IV., cap. 45, the town was constituted a borough, with power to return a member to parliament; the right of election is vested in the £10 householders, and the returning officer is annually appointed by the sheriff: the limits of the borough comprise 800 acres. The county magistrates hold petty-sessions for the division here; and constables and tythingmen are chosen annually at the court leet of the Marquess of Bath. The powers of the county debt-court of Frome, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Frome, and five adjacent parishes.

The parish comprises by estimation 7092½ acres, of which 1497a. 3r. 34p. are arable, 5058a. 1r. 19p. pasture, and 536a. 29p. woodland. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £22; patron and impropriator, the Marquess of Bath: the great tithes have been commuted for £538. 13. 6., and the vicarial for £600. 15.; the glebe comprises 87½ acres, with a house. The parochial church is a spacious structure, consisting of a nave, north and south aisles, chancel, and four sepulchral chapels, with a tower surmounted by a spire, and a north and south porch; a new western front and other embellishments were added about 30 years ago, from a design by the late Sir Jeffrey Wyatville. The interior contains many interesting monuments; and in the churchyard is the grave of Thomas Ken, Bishop of Bath and Wells, who died in 1711, at Longleat House, and was buried here. In the Woodlands, three miles south of the town, a handsome church with a tower surmounted by an octagonal spire was erected in 1712, by Thomas, Viscount Weymouth, who made the living a perpetual curacy by endowing it with £60 a year; it is further endowed with £30 per annum, and with some land. The woodlands that surround it are the only parts of the ancient Forest of Selwood which exhibit any traces of their former character. Christ-church, erected in 1818 by subscription, is a commodious edifice in the later English style, with a square embattled tower: the living is a district perpetual curacy; net income, £150. A district church dedicated to the Holy Trinity was lately built by subscription, Her Majesty's Commissioners and certain religious societies making grants in aid of the design. The Vicar presents to each of these three churches. There are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, Independents, Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Presbyterians. A free school was founded in the reign of Edward VI.; there is a school in union with the National Society, and a charity school is supported from land. Adjoining the last school are almshouses for 31 aged women, maintained by the same means. In that part of the town called Keyford, is an asylum, founded in 1790 by Robert Stevens, Esq., who endowed it with £12,000 in the funds, for the maintenance and education of 40 girls; and with £7000, for the maintenance of 20 aged men, natives of the parish: the annual income is about £650; the premises form a handsome quadrangular range of building. The poor law union of Frome comprises 29 parishes or places, and contains 25,644 inhabitants. John Foster, author of the Essays, resided for some time here.

Froome, Bishop's (St. Mary, or St. Bartholomew)

FROOME, BISHOP'S (St. Mary, or St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Radlow, county of Hereford; containing, with the township of Eggleton, 1079 inhabitants, of whom 900 are in the township of Bishop's-Froome, 4¾ miles (S. by E.) from Bromyard. This parish, which also includes the districts or divisions of Halmonds-Froome, Leadon, Stanford Regis, and Walton, comprises by measurement 4014 acres of land, of great variety in its quality; the valleys are extremely fertile, and the general features of the surface are very picturesque, from its timber, hills, and the small streams of water that meander in different parts. On the river Froome are numerous corn-mills, and its trout are excellent. Wall-stone and paving-stone are found, as also corn-stone and limestone-gravel, the last being burnt for lime. The roads from Ledbury to Bromyard, and Hereford to Worcester, pass through. The Bishop of Hereford holds a court baron, as lord of the manor of Bishop's-Froome township. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 5. 10., and endowed in the last century with the larger portion of the great tithes by R. C. Hopton, then patron: some lands are tithe-free as having belonged to Llanthony Abbey, and others as the property of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem. The rent-charge in lieu of tithes is £569, including the extraordinary charge on hops; and there are 130 acres of glebe-land, with a vicarage-house, a good and substantial dwelling: patron, the Rev. John Hopton. The church is an ancient Norman structure possessing considerable remains of beauty, with a tower of early English architecture; it contains an admirable effigy of a cross-legged knight, and is the burial-place of Richard Hopton, chief justice of North Wales in the reigns of Charles II. and James II., and of Susanna, his wife, an account of whom is published in the Lives of Eminent Women of the 17th Century. There are two schoolrooms, and a house for the master, with an endowment of £15 per annum. A curious formation in the sandstone in the bed of one of the streams here, led to a religious legend of bygone days; and a religious house of some description stood in a part of Stanford Regis.

Froome, Canon (St. James)

FROOME, CANON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Ledbury, hundred of Radlow, county of Hereford, 6 miles (N. W. by N.) from Ledbury; containing 115 inhabitants. The manor-house of Canon-Froome, belonging to the Hopton family, was a military station in the civil war; it was fortified for the king, and afterwards became an intermediate garrison between Hereford and Worcester: the church, which was situated close to it, was destroyed to render it more defensible. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Froome; and the canal from Gloucester, through Ledbury, to Hereford, passes its south-west boundary. It comprises 1023a. 36p., of which about 100 acres are woodland, and the remainder is computed to be in nearly equal portions arable and pasture; the ground is undulated, and the soil in general rich loam, occasionally alternated with sand: limestone-gravel, excellent for roads, is abundant. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed by the Hopton family with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4., and in the gift of the incumbent, the Rev. John Hopton, whose ancestors for several generations have been lords of the manor: the tithes have been commuted for £181. 7., and the glebe contains 4 acres. The church was rebuilt with brick after the Restoration. A school for girls is supported by the incumbent.

Froome, Castle (St. Michael)

FROOME, CASTLE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Ledbury, hundred of Radlow, county of Hereford, 7 miles (N. N. W.) from Ledbury; containing 183 inhabitants. This parish, which is watered by the river Froome, comprises 1474 acres. The surface is varied with hill and dale; the soil is a rich loam, alternated with clay, resting on a limestone-gravel, in the arable lands, and the meadow and pasture lands are luxuriant. The road from Ledbury to Bromyard intersects the parish from south to north. There are extensive quarries of limestone, and of freestone of good quality for building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Rev. W. J. Lyell: the tithes have been commuted for £270, and the glebe contains 55¾ acres.

Froome St. Quintin (St. Mary)

FROOME ST. QUINTIN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Cerne, hundred of Tollerford, Cerne division of Dorset, 9½ miles (E. by N.) from Beaminster; containing 140 inhabitants. This parish derives its name from its situation on the river Froome, and its distinguishing appellation from its ancient lords, the St. Quintins. It comprises by measurement 982 acres: the village is pleasantly situated, and neatly built, and within it is a spring of excellent water. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 7. 1., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £159. 16. 6., and the glebe comprises 21½ acres. At Caldwell was anciently a chapel, and at Evershot is a chapel of ease.

Froome-Vauchurch

FROOME-VAUCHURCH, a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of Tollerford, Dorchester division of Dorset, 7½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Dorchester; containing 180 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Froome, near the roads from Dorchester to Yeovil and Crewkerne, and comprises 614a. 3r. 7p.: there are quarries of a yellowish sandstone, which is used for building. The living is a rectory, with that of Batcombe united in 1772, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 0½., and in the joint patronage of the Duke of Cleveland and the Dowager Countess of Sandwich. The tithes of the parish have been commuted for £170, and the glebe comprises 50 acres, with a small house. The church is a very ancient structure, in the early Norman style. George Brown, in 1774, gave a rent-charge of £21 for teaching children. At the junction of four roads, near a ford across a rivulet that falls into the Froome, is a spot called Tollerford, distinguished as having given name to the hundred, and which had anciently a chapel.

Frostenden (All Saints)

FROSTENDEN (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (N.) from Wangford; containing 428 inhabitants, and comprising 1292 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the gift of the Rev. J. F. Reeve: the tithes have been commuted for £372, and the glebe comprises 26 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, with a circular tower of Norman design.

Frosterley

FROSTERLEY, a township, in the parish of Stanhope, union of Weardale, N. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 3¼ miles (W.) from Wolsingham; containing 386 inhabitants. In this township are extensive limestone-works. An act was passed in 1845 for a railway hence to Wolsingham and Witton-le-Wear. Here was a chapel, which long since went to decay. The loss has been in some degree remedied by the erection, in 1833, of an oratory, which is licensed by the Bishop for divine service and the administration of the sacraments. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. John Hinks in 1735, and Mary Todd in 1824, bequeathed property for a school, now producing an income of about £40.

Frowlesworth (St. Nicholas)

FROWLESWORTH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Lutterworth; containing 318 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the west by the ancient Fosse-way, comprises 1496a. 1r. 14p.; the surface is finely varied with hills, on one of which the village is pleasantly situated. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 10., and in the patronage of the Rev. S. L. Nobles: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and the glebe comprises 58a. 2r. The church is a neat and very ancient structure, the tower of which was rebuilt in 1762. Twenty-two almshouses, forming three sides of a square, were erected at various periods, under a bequest, in 1725, by John Smith, chief baron of His Majesty's exchequer in Scotland, who for some time lived, and was buried here; the almswomen are allowed £20 per annum each.

Froxfield

FROXFIELD, a chapelry, in the parish and hundred of East Meon, union of Petersfield, Petersfield and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Petersfield; containing 656 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Peter. Robert Lane, in 1733, bequeathed £1000 for founding a school, which in 1767 was further endowed with £300, the bequest of Francis Beckford, Esq.

Froxfield (All Saints)

FROXFIELD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Hungerford, hundred of Kinwardstone, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 2½ miles (W. by S.) from Hungerford; containing, with the tythings of Hughditch, Oakhill, and Rudge, 625 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 2000 acres, nearly all arable, is intersected by the road from Bath to London; and within half a mile of the village runs the Kennet and Avon canal. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 16. 4.; net income, £122; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Windsor; impropriator, J. Hasker, Esq. A noble almshouse was founded in 1686, by Sarah, Duchess Dowager of Somerset, who bequeathed considerable property for its erection, and for the maintenance of 30 widows, the number to be increased to 50 when the revenue should exceed £400 per annum. Twenty apartments were added to the original building in 1775, and the whole now forms an oblong quadrangle, with a small chapel within it, erected at the expense of the Marquess of Ailesbury, and the minister of which has a stipend of £70. Thirty widows of clergymen, and twenty widows of laymen, not having an income of more than £20, are eligible to the charity, and the allowance to each is £40 a year.

Froyle (St. Mary)

FROYLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Alton, Alton and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3½ miles (N. E.) from Alton; containing 849 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Wey, and comprises about 3500 acres. The surface is hilly, and from some of the heights are obtained pleasing and extensive views of the surrounding country; the soil is generally a deep rich loam. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 12. 3½.; net income, £245; patron and impropriator, the Rev. Sir Thomas C. Miller, Bart.

Fryern-Barnet.—See Barnet, Fryern.

FRYERN-BARNET.—See Barnet, Fryern.

Fryerning (St. Mary)

FRYERNING (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Chelmsford, S. division of Essex, 1 mile (N. W. by W.) from Ingatestone; containing 807 inhabitants. This parish, which derives its name from having belonged to the friars of the hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, is distinguished for the luxuriance of its meadows and pasture-lands; and the surrounding district abounds with picturesque and varied scenery. The manor, after the suppression of monasteries, was purchased by Dorothy, widow of Nicholas Wadham, founder of Wadham College, Oxford; who completed the foundation which her husband had commenced. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the patronage of the College: the tithe rentcharge is £385. The church is ancient, with a massive tower of brick.

Frystone, Ferry (St. Andrew)

FRYSTONE, FERRY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, ¾ of a mile (W. N. W.) from FerryBridge; containing 951 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated in the fertile vale of the Aire, comprises 3040a. 3r. 18p.; the surface is varied, and the surrounding scenery abounds with interesting features. Magnesian limestone is extensively quarried for building and other purposes, and considerable quantities of fine casting sand are sent to the various foundries in the neighbourhood. The York and North-Midland railway enters the parish by a magnificent viaduct, and traverses the northern parts of it. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 19. 2.; patrons, the Sub-Chanter and Vicars Choral of the Cathedral of York: the great tithes have been commuted for £405. 5., and the vicarial for £192. 5. 10.; the glebes respectively comprise 64 and 75 acres. The church is an ancient and very handsome structure in the Norman style, with a tower, and is romantically situated on the bank of the Aire. There are several barrows, in one of which was found the skeleton of a man in full armour, in 1820.

Frystone, Monk

FRYSTONE, MONK, a parish, in the Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 4 miles (N. N. E.) from Ferry-Bridge; comprising the townships of Burton-Salmon, Monk-Frystone, and Hillam; and containing 937 inhabitants, of whom 429 are in the township of Monk-Frystone. The parish comprises 4017a. 3r. 20p.; and limestone, freestone, and alabaster are found, the last of which is prepared and sold in great quantities as plaster of Paris. The York and North-Midland railway passes through the parish; and the village is pleasantly situated on the road from Leeds to Selby. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £124; patron, the Prebendary of Wistow in the Cathedral of York: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1792; the land comprises 380 acres. The church, rebuilt in 1447, is a handsome structure in the later English style. There are two places of worship for Wesleyans.

Fryton

FRYTON, a township, in the parish of Hovingham, union of Malton, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 6¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Malton; containing 77 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Barton to Hovingham, and comprises about 970 acres of land, the property of the Earl of Carlisle.

Fugglestone, or Fulstone (St. Peter)

FUGGLESTONE, or Fulstone (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Wilton, hundred of Branch and Dole, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts; containing, with the tything of Quidhampton, 412 inhabitants. This place, which is situated at the junction of the rivers Willy and Nadder, forms a continuous appendage to the borough of Wilton; it participates in the general interest of that town, and an extensive manufactory of Axminster and Wilton carpets is carried on, affording employment to 200 persons. Fairs. chiefly for sheep, are held on the 4th of May and 12th of September; at the former about 8000, and at the latter 80,000, are usually exposed for sale. The parish comprises by measurement 1643 acres. The living is a rectory, with that of Bemerton united, valued in the king's books at £24, and in the gift of the Earl of Pembroke: the tithes have been commuted for £550, and the glebe comprises 4 acres. The church is an ancient and very handsome structure in the Norman style. According to Leland, Ethelred, King of the West Saxons, having been slain by the Danes in 827, was buried here. An hospital for leprous brethren and sisters, dedicated to St. Giles and St. Anthony, is stated to have been founded at this place by Adelicia, second queen of Henry I. Its revenue, at the time of the general Dissolution, was valued at £5. 13. 4.; the establishment was continued, and now consists of a prior (who is appointed by the corporation of Wilton, and must be in holy orders), three brethren, and two sisters: the income is £60. 12. Of the ancient building, only the ruinous chapel remains, in which it is said the royal foundress was interred.

Fulbeck (St. Nicholas)

FULBECK (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Newark, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 10¼ miles (N. by E.) from Grantham; containing 694 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Grantham to Lincoln, and comprises 3577a. 2r. 23p.: limestone is quarried for building and also for manure. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 15. 7½.; net income, £518; patron, Sir Henry Fane: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1804. The church is a very ancient structure, with a handsome tower; the exterior is in the later English style, but the interior exhibits portions in the Norman, early English, and decorated styles, with a very fine Norman font. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Fulbourn

FULBOURN, a district, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Flendish, county of Cambridge, 5 miles (E. S. E.) from Cambridge; comprising the parishes of All Saints and St. Vigors, and containing 1405 inhabitants. This place is of considerable antiquity, and had formerly a guildhall; it is supposed to have derived its name from the large quantity of water which formerly covered the lower grounds that constitute the larger part of the district. The area is 5500 acres, and nearly the whole is arable. The living of All Saints' is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 17.; net income, £253; patron, the Bishop of Ely; impropriator, S. E. Pearse, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1806. The living of St. Vigors' is a rectory, valued at £25. 15. 2½.; net income, £244; patrons, the Master and Fellows of St. John's College, Cambridge. Both churches were situated in one churchyard, but that of All Saints' parish having fallen into decay, was taken down in 1776, and duty is now performed by both incumbents in St. Vigors' church, a handsome structure containing several brasses. Here is a place of worship for Independents; also a school endowed with lands producing £26 per annum. There are bequests to a considerable amount for the repair of the church and the benefit of the poor; and on the north side of the churchyard are some ancient almshouses for eleven aged inhabitants.

Fulbroke

FULBROKE, a parish, in the union of Stratfordupon-Avon, Snitterfield division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Stratford; containing 70 inhabitants. This place, according to Sir William Dugdale, after passing into the possession of many distinguished families, descended at length to Richard Beauchamp, Lord Abergavenny, younger brother of the Earl of Warwick; whose lady, Joan, built a sumptuous gate-house and lodge, which were long since demolished. It was afterwards granted by the crown to John, Duke of Bedford, third son of Henry IV., who formed a park, and built within it a castle, which was taken down in the beginning of the reign of Henry VIII., by Sir William Compton, Knt., who employed the materials in building his house at Compton-Wyniates. The manor was subsequently purchased by the Lucys, of Charlecote, of whom Sir Thomas Lucy, Knt., is said to have prosecuted Shakspeare, for stealing deer in these grounds. The park has long been destroyed, and also a chapel, which was for some time the parish church. The parish is situated on the right bank of the river Avon, and intersected by the road from Warwick to Stratford; and consists of 822 acres. The living is a rectory, united in 1428 to the perpetual curacy of Sherborne, and valued in the king's books at 14s. 2d.

Fulbrook (St. James)

FULBROOK (St. James), a parish, in the union of Witney, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford, ¾ of a mile (N. E. by N.) from Burford; containing 368 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1588a. 1r. 26p., of which 1295 acres are arable, 151 pasture, and 141 woodland. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Burford: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1817. Increased accommodation has been provided in the church.