Greet - Gretton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

338-340

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'Greet - Gretton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 338-340. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50990 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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Greet

GREET, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Winchcomb, Lower division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 1 mile (N.) from the town of Winchcomb.

Greet

GREET, a parish, in the union of Tenbury, hundred of Overs, S. division of Salop, 2½ miles (W. N. W.) from Tenbury; containing 112 inhabitants, and comprising about 700 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5; net income, £160; patrons, the family of Hope.

Greetham (All Saints)

GREETHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, hundred of Hill, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Horncastle; containing 177 inhabitants. This parish, which is part of the duchy of Lancaster, comprises 1180 acres. The village is pleasantly situated on a commanding eminence, a little north of the road from Horncastle to Spilsby. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 19. 4.; net income, £275; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The principal tithes were commuted for corn-rents, under an act of inclosure in 1793; and the remainder have since been commuted for a rent-charge of £44.

Greetham (St. Mary)

GREETHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Alstoe, county of Rutland, 6 miles (N. E.) from Oakham; containing 583 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 3. 9.; net income, £163; patron, G. Finch, Esq., who, with G. Heathcote, Esq., is impropriator: the tithes were commuted for land in 1763. Here is an endowed school, founded in the reign of William III.

Greetland, with Elland.—See Elland.

GREETLAND, with Elland.—See Elland.

Greetwell (All Saints)

GREETWELL (All Saints), a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 2¼ miles (E.) from Lincoln; containing 42 inhabitants. At the Domesday survey, the manor was held by Roger de Busli; the lands are now leased by the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln to many persons. The parish comprises about 1300 acres, situated on the north bank of the Witham, and derives its name from a fine spring which sends forth a copious stream to that river. A branch of the Dallyson family was formerly seated here. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £52; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The church is a small structure, anciently much larger than at present.

Gregory, St.

GREGORY, ST., an extra-parochial liberty, contiguous to the eastern part of the city of Canterbury, in the union of Blean, hundred of Westgate, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of the county of Kent; containing 1244 inhabitants.

Greinton (St. Michael)

GREINTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of Whitley, W. division of Somerset, 6½ miles (W. S. W.) from Glastonbury; containing 213 inhabitants, and comprising about 850 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 0. 10.; net income, £165; patron, S. T. Kekewich, Esq. The church is a neat structure in the later English style.

Grendon (St. Mary)

GRENDON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of Wymmersley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 5½ miles (S. by W.) from Wellingborough; containing 595 inhabitants. It is situated on the right bank of the river Nene, which bounds it on the north; and consists of 1649a. 2r. 18p. of a rich and fertile soil. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £135; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1780.

Grendon (All Saints)

GRENDON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Atherstone, Tamworth division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 3¼ miles (N. W.) from Atherstone; containing, with the hamlet of Whittington, 529 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the borders of Leicestershire, and comprises, partly by measurement and partly by computation, 2349 acres, of which two-thirds are arable; the soil is rich, and both the arable and pasture lands are luxuriantly fertile. The surface is generally flat, and some of the meadows are subject to occasional inundation from the small river Anker: this stream propels a flour-mill belonging to Mr. Mullaby. Coal is found in the immediate vicinity. The Coventry and Fazeley canal passes through the parish, and the rateable annual value of that species of property, here, is returned at £500; it is also intersected by the roads leading from Tamworth and Atherstone to Ashby-de-la-Zouch. Grendon Hall, the seat of Sir George Chetwynd, Bart., is a handsome mansion. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 3. 4.; net income, £525; patron, Sir G. Chetwynd. The church, a very interesting structure, has been repaired and beautified at the expense of the patron, and contains several monuments to the Chetwynd family. A school is supported by Lady Chetwynd.

Grendon, Bishop (St. John the Baptist)

GRENDON, BISHOP (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 4¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Bromyard; containing 231 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Leominster to Bromyard, and consists of 1588 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £59; patron, the Vicar of Bromyard. Of the tithes a rent-charge of £11 is paid to the deacon of Bishop-Grendon, one of £6. 1. to the senior rector of the church of Bromyard, and another of £10 to the perpetual curate here. The church was rebuilt in 1788, at the expense of six individuals, the old edifice having fallen down in 1786. There are vestiges of an ancient intrenchment.

Grendon-Underwood (St. Leonard)

GRENDON-UNDERWOOD (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Aylesbury, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 10 miles (W. N. W.) from Aylesbury; containing 384 inhabitants. A portion of the female population is employed in the making of lace, which is carried on to a considerable extent. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 6. 8.; net income, £269; patron, Grenville Pigott, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1769. The church contains handsome monuments to Lord and Lady Saye and Sele, and to the Pigott family. Lady Saye and Sele bequeathed property now producing £120 per annum, for apprenticing children; and £6. 10. per annum were bequeathed to the poor by Thomas Pigott, Esq.

Grendon-Warren

GRENDON-WARREN, a chapelry, in the parish of Pencombe, union of Bromyard, hundred of Broxash, county of Hereford, 4¾ miles (W.) from Bromyard; containing 34 inhabitants, and comprising 630 acres.

Gresham (All Saints)

GRESHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Erpingham, hundred of North Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 5¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Cromer; containing 340 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1287a. 6p., of which 998 acres are arable, 350 pasture, and about 40 woodland; the surface is hilly, the soil in the lower grounds a stiffish clay, and in the higher a light gravel. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 9., and in the gift of the Rev. John Spurgin: the tithes have been commuted for £321, and the glebe comprises 25 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure, chiefly in the decorated English style, with a circular tower surmounted by an octagonal turret, and contains some monuments to the Spurgin family, and a curiously sculptured font. There are foundations of a large castellated building, which it is said Sir Edmund Bacon obtained a licence from Edward II. to embattle; it is of a quadrilateral form, with a semicircular projection at each angle, probably the remains of towers or turrets, and is surrounded by a deep fosse. Gresham gave name to the family of which Sir Thomas, the founder of the Royal Exchange and of Gresham College, was a member.

Gresley, Castle

GRESLEY, CASTLE, a hamlet, in the parish of Church-Gresley, union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 4 miles (S. E. by S.) from Burton; containing 146 inhabitants. The manor belonged from the period of the Norman invasion to the family of De Gresley, who built a castle here, the site of which is now distinguished only by slight eminences and inequalities of the ground. An early member of this family was one of the Conqueror's ancestors. The hamlet comprises 563a. 3r. 24p. of fertile land, of which one-third is arable, and the remainder, including about four acres of woodland, chiefly pasture. The road from Burton to Tamworth passes through.

Gresley, Church

GRESLEY, CHURCH, a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 5 miles (S. E.) from Burton; comprising the townships of ChurchGresley, Drakelow, Linton, and Swadlincote, the hamlet of Castle-Gresley, and part of the hamlets of Donisthorpe and Oakthorpe; and containing 2764 inhabitants. A priory of canons, of the order of St. Augustine, was founded here in the reign of Henry I. by one of the Gresley family, and dedicated to St. Mary and St. George; its revenue at the Dissolution was valued at £39. 13. 8. Henry VIII. granted the site in 1543 to Henry Criche. In 1556 Sir Christopher Aleyne, Knt., purchased the estate, with the manor of Church-Gresley, of the Seymours; and it was afterwards in the Meynells, of whom it was purchased, about 1775, by Sir Nigel Gresley, Bart. The parish is partly bounded on the north by the river Trent, and comprises 4712a. 2r. 13p., in about equal portions of arable and pasture; the soil is generally a strong clay, and the scenery is of pleasing character, in some parts richly embellished with woods and plantations. The substratum abounds with coal and various kinds of clay, of the former of which an extensive mine is in operation in the township of Church-Gresley, and four others are wrought in the hamlet of Swadlincote. A very extensive manufacture of earthenware is carried on, affording employment to more than 300 persons; a peculiar vein of clay is found, for making fire-bricks; and there is an abundance of common clay for bricks, in making which a great number of the population is engaged. Ironstone is raised for the roads; and there is a quarry of soft stone, which is used in the coal-mines, and, when pulverised, is substituted for sand. Tramways have been formed to the Ashby canal. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £108, with a good residence, built in 1837; patron, the Rev. George Wood Lloyd, D.D. The church is an ancient structure, of which the tower is in the Norman style, and the remainder of more modern date. At Donisthorpe, a church was built and endowed by three ladies of the name of Moore, in 1838; and another church has been built at Swadlincote. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans; and a national school supported by subscription.

Gressenhall (St. Mary)

GRESSENHALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Launditch, W. division of Norfolk, 2¾ miles (N. W.) from East Dereham; containing 957 inhabitants. This parish, with one-third of the ancient parish of Great Bittering, comprising 388 acres, which have merged into Gressen-hall, contains 2616 acres, whereof 1799 are arable, 650 pasture, 140 woodland, and 27 in roads, &c. Fairs for cattle and horses are held on the Tuesday before Whit-Sunday, and on December 6th. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 13. 4.; net income, £687; patrons, the Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge: the glebe comprises about 50 acres, with a house. The church is chiefly in the decorated and later English styles, and is a large cruciform pile, having a tower rising from the intersection, which was surmounted by a spire, taken down in 1698. There was also a collegiate chapel, founded by William de Stuteville in the reign of Henry III., and dedicated to St. Nicholas; the remains have been converted into an infirmary to the house of industry, which was erected here in 1776, and is now the union workhouse for Mitford and Launditch. The college possessed a common seal, representing St. Nicholas in his pontificals; the last incumbent, who was living in 1503, had a pension of £4. 16. granted by the crown.

Gressingham

GRESSINGHAM, a chapelry, in the parish of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire, 8 miles (N. E.) from Lancaster; containing 185 inhabitants. A family of the same name was seated here at a very early period; and mention is made of several families who subsequently held lands within the township, amongst them the De Burghs, in the reign of Henry III., and Stanleys, in that of Elizabeth. The place is situated on the west side of the river Lune, and has some beautiful sites for building, with fine views of Hornby Castle, the vale of the Lune, Ingleborough, and other distant Yorkshire hills. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Lancaster; net income, £80, with a house; impropriator, Francis Pearson, Esq., of Kirkby-Lonsdale, in right of his ancient estate of Gressingham Hall. The church is an old structure, with a square tower, and fine Saxon porch, and contains two small brasses.

Gresty, with Shavington.—See Shavington.

GRESTY, with Shavington.—See Shavington.

Greta-Bridge

GRETA-BRIDGE, a hamlet, in the parishes of Brignall, Rokeby, and Wycliffe, union of Teesdale, W. division of the wapentake of Gilling, N. riding of York, 54 miles (N. W. by N.) from York, and 242½ (N. N. W.) from London. It takes its name from a lofty bridge of one arch, erected in the line of the Watling-street, upon the site of a more ancient structure, over the river Greta, a little above its junction with the Tees: at each extremity is a commodious inn, once much frequented by travellers on the great road from London to Glasgow. There are vestiges of a Roman camp in the neighbourhood, where an altar and several coins have been discovered; and here Mr. Ward places the Maglove of the Notitia.

Gretton

GRETTON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Winchcomb, Lower division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2¼ miles (N. W.) from the town of Winchcomb. The tithes were commuted for land in 1814. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Gretton (St. James)

GRETTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Uppingham, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 2¾ miles (N. E.) from Rockingham, containing 859 inhabitants. The parish occupies the right bank of the river Welland, which separates it on the west from Rutlandshire; and comprises by admeasurement 4450 acres, of which a large extent is rich meadow, and about 1265 acres old forest-land. The surface is varied, and embellished with wood: the prevailing kind of timber is oak, and the agricultural produce wheat, with barley and beans; but grazing is the chief occupation of the farmers. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Duddington annexed, valued in the king's books at £19. 6. 8.; net income, £450; patron, the Bishop of Peterborough. The church is an ancient structure. Here is a place of worship for Baptists; also a national school, supported by the Earl of Winchilsea. Kirby Hall, a spacious rectangular mansion erected by Sir Christopher Hatton, an ancestor of his lordship's, in the reign of Elizabeth, is in the parish, and is a fine specimen of the domestic architecture of that period.