Gunthorpe - Gyhirn

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

360-362

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'Gunthorpe - Gyhirn', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 360-362. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50994 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


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Gunthorpe

GUNTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of Owston, poor-law union of Gainsborough, W. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 117 inhabitants.

Gunthorpe (St. Mary)

GUNTHORPE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Holt, W. division of Norfolk, 5¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Holt; containing 334 inhabitants. It comprises 1087a. 1r. 13p., of which 779 acres are arable, 178 pasture and meadow, and 41 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Bale annexed, valued in the king's books at £13; patron, lord of the manor, and incumbent, the Rev. J. H. Sparke, who resides at the Hall: the tithes have been commuted for £310. 18., and the glebe comprises 23 acres. The church, which is chiefly in the later English style, consists of a nave and chancel, a north chapel, and a square embattled tower; the font is curiously sculptured: in the chapel are neat monuments to members of the Collyer family.

Gunthorpe

GUNTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of Paston, union and soke of Peterborough, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from Peterborough; containing 64 inhabitants.

Gunthorpe

GUNTHORPE, a township, in the parish of Lowdham, union of Southwell, S. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton and of the county of Nottingham, 7¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Nottingham; containing 349 inhabitants. The river Trent is here crossed by a ferry. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Gunthwaite

GUNTHWAITE, a township, in the parish of Penistone, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 7½ miles (W.) from Barnsley; containing 66 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1100 acres, south of the road from Cawthorne to Cumberworth, and east of that from Huddersfield to Sheffield.

Gunton (St. Andrew)

GUNTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Erpingham, hundred of North Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 5½ miles (N. N. E.) from Aylsham; containing 69 inhabitants. The parish comprises 945a. 5p., of which 683 acres are meadow and pasture, 206 woodland, and about 5 arable. Gunton House, the seat of Lord Suffield, is a noble mansion of white brick, standing on an eminence commanding a beautiful view of the undulated grounds and varied scenery of the park, which is of vast extent, and planted with fine trees. The road through the park to Thorpe passes under the arch of an elegant tower, upwards of 120 feet high. The living is a discharged rectory, with the vicarage of Hanworth and rectory of Suffield consolidated, valued in the king's books at £8; patron, and impropriator of Hanworth, Lord Suffield. The tithes of Gunton have been commuted for £100, and there are 29 acres of glebe. The church is picturesquely situated in the park, opposite the principal front of the mansion; it was rebuilt, with a portico of the Doric order, by Sir William Harbord, ancestor of Lord Suffield.

Gunton (St. Peter)

GUNTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of Mutford and Lothingland, E. division of Suffolk, 1½ mile (N. by W.) from Lowestoft; containing 77 inhabitants, and comprising 803 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8., and in the gift of Mrs. Mary S. Fowler: the tithes have been commuted for £145, and the glebe contains 9 acres. The church has a round tower, and some details of Norman architecture.

Gunville, Tarrant, in the county of Dorset.—See Tarrant-Gunville.

GUNVILLE, TARRANT, in the county of Dorset. —See Tarrant-Gunville.

Gunwalloe (St. Wynwallow)

GUNWALLOE (St. Wynwallow), a parish, in the union of Helston, W. division of the hundred of Kerrier and of the county of Cornwall, 5 miles (S.) from Helston; containing 298 inhabitants. The parish is on the shore of Mount's bay, and comprises 1328 acres, of which 184 are waste land or common. The old living is a vicarage, annexed, with the livings of Cury and Germoe, to the vicarage of Breage. A perpetual curacy has been lately founded for the parishes of Gunwalloe and Cury. The church is an ancient edifice with a low detached tower, occupying a romantic situation close to the sea. Here is a place of worship for dissenters.

Gussage (All Saints)

GUSSAGE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Wimborne and Cranborne, hundred of Knowlton, Wimborne division of Dorset, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from Cranborne; containing, with the hamlet of Mannington, 390 inhabitants. It comprises 2441 acres, whereof 673 are waste. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 9.: the tithes have been commuted for £580, out of which a rent-charge of £480 is paid to the Archdeacon of Dorset, who has a glebe of 60 acres, and is also patron; and one of £100 to the vicar, whose glebe comprises 10 acres.

Gussage (St. Andrew)

GUSSAGE (St. Andrew), a chapelry, in the parish of Handley, union of Wimborne and Cranborne, hundred of Sixpenny-Handley, Wimborne division of Dorset, 6¼ miles (W. by N.) from Cranborne; containing, with Minchington tything, 163 inhabitants.

Gussage (St. Michael)

GUSSAGE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Wimborne and Cranborne, hundred of Badbury, though locally in the hundred of Knowlton, Wimborne division of Dorset, 6 miles (W. by S.) from Cranborne; containing, with the hamlet of Sutton, 280 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2882 acres, of which 64 are waste land or common. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 0. 2½.; net income, £393; patron, Lord Portman. The church is a handsome edifice, with a lofty embattled tower. On the line of the London road, near Cashmore inn, is the easternmost of seven earthworks, supposed to have been thrown up by the Belgæ across the road between this and Tarrant-Hinton, and which afford reason for the opinion that the neighbourhood was the scene of some remarkable action in the time of the ancient Britons.

Guston (St. Martin)

GUSTON (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Dovor, hundred of Bewsborough, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Dovor; containing 237 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1400 acres, of which about 1000 are arable, 30 woodland, and the remainder meadow and pasture. The road from Dovor to Deal passes through it. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the appropriator; net income, £66. The church is an ancient building of flints. There is a small place of worship for dissenters.

Guton

GUTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Brandistone, union of St. Faith, hundred of Eynsford, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (S. E. by E.) from Reepham. This place, written Gutheketuna in Domesday book, was at the period of the survey a considerable town, though now merely a rural hamlet, entirely destitute of note.

Guy's Cliff, Leek-Wootton.—See Warwick.

GUY'S CLIFF, Leek-Wootton.—See Warwick.

Guyson, or Guyzance

GUYSON, or Guyzance, an extra-parochial district, in the union of Alnwick, E. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 8½ miles (S. by E.) from Alnwick; containing, with Brainshaugh, 205 inhabitants. A priory was founded here some time in the twelfth century, by Richard Tyson, and afterwards annexed to the abbey of Alnwick, by Eustace Fitz-John; its revenue, in the Lincoln taxation of temporalities, was valued at £3. 15. 4. per annum. The place is the property of the Duke of Northumberland. The river Coquet winds in a very devious course on the south of the village, which is of neat appearance; and about a mile distant is Bank House, a handsome mansion, embosomed in plantations.

Guyting, Lower, or Guyting-Power (St. Michael)

GUYTING, LOWER, or Guyting-Power (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Winchcomb, Lower division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (S. E. by E.) from Winchcomb; containing, with the chapelry of Farmcote, 672 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 19. 5.; net income, £124; patron and impropriator, J. Walker, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1798. The church is in the Norman style. There is a chapel of ease at Farmcote.

Guyting, Temple (St. Mary)

GUYTING, TEMPLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Winchcomb, Lower division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Winchcomb; containing 523 inhabitants, and comprising 5700a. 3r. 20p. Stone is quarried, chiefly for building purposes. There was a fulling-mill in the parish in the reign of Edward III., which is said to have been the first established in the county on the introduction of the cloth manufacture. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £94; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1804; there are 16 acres of glebe here, and 12 acres in the parish of Chipping-Norton, with a parsonage-house in good repair. The church, a small handsome edifice with a lofty embattled tower at the west end, was probably built by the Knights Templars (who possessed the manor in the thirteenth century), and is in excellent preservation.

Gweek

GWEEK, a small port, in the hundred of Kerrier, W. division of Cornwall, 3½ miles (E. by S.) from Helston. The pilchard-fishery is carried on extensively, 200 boats being employed in taking the fish, which are cured in the various creeks and coves within the limits of the port. In addition to the fishery, the chief trade consists in the exportation of copper-ore, corn, moorstone, and oysters, and the importation of timber, coal, and limestone.

Gwehellog

GWEHELLOG, a hamlet, in the parish of Usk, union of Pont-y-Pool, division and hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth; containing 356 inhabitants. It occupies the north-eastern portion of the parish.

Gwennap (St. Wenap)

GWENNAP (St. Wenap), a parish, in the union of Redruth, E. division of the hundred of Kerrier, W. division of Cornwall, 8 miles (E.) from Truro; containing, with the chapelry of St. Day, 10,794 inhabitants. This parish abounds with copper and tin mines, worked upon a very extensive scale. Here are the Consolidated Mines, the largest in the kingdom; and the Tresavean mine, the proprietors of which share among them £30,000 per annum, after deducting all expenses, which may be regarded as a profit of £300 per annum on every original share of £25. The value of the produce of these and other mines in the parish, in 1840, was £293,218, and the total produce of the whole county in the same year amounted only to £819,949. In 1834, an act was obtained for making a railway from Hayle, in the parish of St. Erth, to the Tresavean mine, with several branches; and there are railways communicating with the north coast at Portreath, and with the south coast at Devran. Scorier House, the property of John Williams, Esq., contains a fine assortment of Cornish minerals, collected by that gentleman within the last 40 years, and valued at £30,000. The parish comprises 6565 acres, whereof 1641 are waste land or common. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16. 18. 11½.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Exeter: the great tithes have been commuted for £255, and the vicarial for £420: the glebe consists of 69 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style, with a detached tower; a gallery has been erected, by which 200 free sittings have been provided. At St. Day is a chapel, to which a district was assigned in 1835; and at Lannarth is a church dedicated to Christ. There are places of worship for Baptists, Bryanites, and Wesleyans. On the southwest side of Gwennap Pit is a mountain called Karn Marth, upon whose summit is a large stone tumulus, or barrow, out of which two British urns were taken in 1789. On a mountain opposite to it, named Trebowling, is a very strong fortification, inclosing about an acre of ground encompassed by a ditch and rampart, nearly 20 feet high. There is also a very singular encampment in the grounds of Scorier House.

Gwernesney (St. Michael)

GWERNESNEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Pont-y-Pool, division and hundred of Usk, county of Monmouth, 2½ miles (E. N. E.) from Usk; containing 55 inhabitants. It is situated on the new road from Usk to Chepstow, and comprises by computation 600 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 18. 6½.; net income, £112; patron, the Duke of Beaufort.

Gwinear (St. Winnear)

GWINEAR (St. Winnear), a parish, in the union of Redruth, E. division of the hundred of Penwith, W. division of Cornwall, 3¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Camborne; containing 2862 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4618 acres, of which 164 are waste land or common; the soil varies from a light friable mould to a heavy clay, occasionally covered with pebbles of white spar. There are several copper-mines, the principal of which, called Herland, produces also native silver. The chief villages are Cattebidrew, Drannock, Fraddam, Penhal, Tregortha, and Wall. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12; patron, the Bishop of Exeter; impropriators, the Rector and Fellows of Exeter College, Oxford: the great tithes have been commuted for £483, and the vicarial for £284; the glebe comprises 34 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A quantity of Roman copper and silver coins was found about thirty years since, in digging for manure on the estate of Trungle; and in 1830, coins of Constantinus Tyrannicus, Flavius Julius, and Faustina, were discovered in an old fortification at Coswinsawsen.

Gwithian (St. Gothian)

GWITHIAN (St. Gothian), a parish, in the union of Redruth, E. division of the hundred of Penwith, W. division of Cornwall, 7½ miles (W.) from Redruth; containing 625 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2074 acres, of which 300 are waste land or common; it is situated on the shore of the Bristol Channel, and intersected by the river Gwithian, which falls into St. Ives bay at a short distance from the bridge. A considerable portion of the land is covered with sand drifted from the shore in violent gales; and at no great distance from the church, an ancient chapel and some houses were overwhelmed, which, on the recent drifting of the sand, have been exposed to view. Several mines were formerly worked in the parish, at shallow levels, the lodes of which were extensive; but with the exception of Wheal St. Andrew, which is still in operation, they have been discontinued. There are quarries of building-stone; and a singular kind of sandstone is found, which is esteemed by geologists as a great curiosity, and is used instead of bricks in the construction of chimneys. The living is a rectory annexed to that of Phillack: the tithes have been commuted for £234. 19. 6. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Some remains exist of two moats of extensive earthworks, called Trevarnon Rounds, within which were found some cannon-balls, now in the possession of the rector.

Gyhirn

GYHIRN, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Mary, Wisbech, union and hundred of Wisbech, Isle of Ely, county of Cambridge, 5½ miles (N. N. W.) from March; containing 332 inhabitants. It lies on the north bank of the river Nene, and on the road from Wisbech to March. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Vicar of Wisbech. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene, is a simple structure, built in 1666.



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