Hambledon - Hampshire-Cross

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

387-391

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'Hambledon - Hampshire-Cross', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 387-391. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51001 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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Hambledon (St. Peter)

HAMBLEDON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Droxford, partly in the hundred of Meon-Stoke, but chiefly in that of Hambledon, Droxford and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (W. N. W.) from Horndean; containing, with the three tythings of Chidden with Glidden, Denmead, and Ervills, 2069 inhabitants, of whom 827 are in the village of Hambledon. The parish comprises 9041a. 1r. 21p., of which about 5922 acres are arable, 2263 down and pasture, and 856 wood; the northern part is chiefly open downs, and in the middle are light lands of easy cultivation, and well adapted for turnip husbandry. Windmill Down was the celebrated resort of the cricket players of Hampshire and the adjacent counties, but is now under tillage. The scenery is generally pleasing, and enlivened with gentlemen's seats. There is a market on Tuesday. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £26. 19. 2.; net income, £529; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Winchester. The church is a handsome edifice, partly in the early and partly in the later English style. £20 per annum, arising from land, are divided among four widows. Admiral Sir Erasmus Gore, governor of Newfoundland, resided here for many years, and was buried in the church, in which is a marble monument to his memory. There are remains of four ancient chapels.

Hambledon (St. Peter)

HAMBLEDON (St. Peter), a parish, and the head of a union, in the First division of the hundred of Godalming, W. division of Surrey, 4 miles (S. by W.) from Godalming; containing 534 inhabitants. It comprises about 1264 acres, of which the greater portion is arable land: the scenery is romantic. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 11.; net income, £207; patron, the Earl of Radnor. The church was much improved and enlarged in 1846, and occupies an elevated situation: in the churchyard are two fine yew-trees, one of which measures twenty-two feet in circumference at three feet from the ground. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The poor law union comprises 16 parishes or places, and contains a population of 12,811.

Hambleton

HAMBLETON, an ecclesiastical parish, in the parish of Kirkham, union of Garstang, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of Lancashire, 17 miles (N. W. by W.) from Preston; containing 349 inhabitants. This place is mentioned in the Domesday survey. It was given by King John to an ancestor of the Sherburns, who were succeeded in the possession of the manor by the Weld family. Hambleton is situated on the northern bank of the navigable river Wyre, by which it is separated from the rest of the parish; and comprises 1322a. 2r. 4p., whereof about 504 acres are arable, 597 pasture, 191 meadow, and a very small portion woodland. The Wyre, which is here 500 yards in breadth, is crossed by a ferry to Poulton, called Shard ferry. "This river," Dr. Leigh observes, "affords a pearl-fishing, pearls being frequently found in large muscles, named by the inhabitants Hambleton hookins, from their manner of taking them, which is done by plucking them from their skeers or beds with hooks:" "these pearl-muscles," he adds, "are very common in Lancashire." Hambleton long formed a chapelry in the parish; but by an order in council made 21st January, 1846, it was constituted a separate benefice. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Kirkham; net income, about £125. The tithes have been commuted for £178. 13. payable to the Dean and Chapter of ChristChurch, Oxford, and £35. 19. 8. to the vicar. The church is a plain brick building, erected in 1749, on the site of a very ancient chapel, of which the date is unknown.

Hambleton

HAMBLETON, a hamlet, in the parish of Barkby, union of Barrow, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of Leicestershire; containing 7 inhabitants.

Hambleton (St. Andrew)

HAMBLETON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Martinsley, county of Rutland, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Oakham; containing 325 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Stamford to Leicester, and comprises by computation 4000 acres, of which 3000 are arable and pasture. The soil consists of loam and clay, about half of the land being of good quality, and the rest poor and comparatively unproductive; the surface is undulated, and agreeably interspersed with wood. The living is a vicarage, with the living of Braunston annexed, valued in the king's books at £10. 17. 1.; net income, £180; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. In a field near the Hall is a mineral spring.

Hambleton

HAMBLETON, a township, in the parish of Brayton, Lower division of the wapentake of BarkstoneAsh, W. riding of York, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from Selby; containing 607 inhabitants. The township comprises about 2200 acres. The soil is light and sandy, but not unfertile; the surface is boldly undulated, and the lofty and richly-wooded hill called Hambleton Hough forms a conspicuous feature in the scenery. A station on the Leeds and Selby railway is situated here. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments, under an inclosure act, in 1796, when, also, an allotment was given for the support of a school erected in the same year. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hambridge

HAMBRIDGE, a tything, in the parish of CurryRivell, union of Langport, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of Somerset; containing 340 inhabitants. Here is a district church, dedicated to St. James.

Hambrook

HAMBROOK, a hamlet, in the parish of Winterbourne, union of Clifton, Upper division of the hundred of Langley and Swinehead, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 5¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Bristol; containing 607 inhabitants.

Hameringham (All Saints)

HAMERINGHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, hundred of Hill, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3¾ miles (E. S. E.) from Horncastle; containing 171 inhabitants, and comprising 1179 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Scrayfield united, valued in the king's books at £8. 14. 2., and in the gift of the family of Coltman: on the inclosure of the parish, an allotment comprising 200 acres of land was made in lieu of tithes. The church is a very ancient structure, with a curious font sculptured with armorial bearings.

Hamerton (All Saints)

HAMERTON (All Saints), a parish, in the hundred of Leightonstone, union and county of Huntingdon, 9½ miles (N. W.) from Huntingdon; containing 160 inhabitants, and comprising 2150 acres by measurement. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 5. 5., and in the gift of S. Barry, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £435, and the glebe comprises 47 acres. The church is an elegant structure, with a handsome tower, formerly surmounted by a spire, which was destroyed by lightning.

Hamfallow

HAMFALLOW, a tything, in the parish, and Upper division of the hundred, of Berkeley, union of Thornbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 697 inhabitants.

Hamgreen

HAMGREEN, a tything, in the parish of Portbury, union of Bedminster, hundred of Portbury, E. division of Somerset; containing 101 inhabitants.

Hammersmith (St. Paul)

HAMMERSMITH (St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Kensington, Kensington division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex, 3½ miles (W. by S.) from London; containing 13,453 inhabitants. This village, which, by a continuity of buildings, is almost united with Kensington, forms one of the most populous appendages to the western part of the metropolis, and is pleasantly situated, on the northern bank of the river Thames. The principal street extends along the line of the great western road, and a wide street called the Broadway diverges from it towards the river; the houses are in general of respectable appearance, and there are some handsome ranges of modern erection. In the environs are numerous seats and elegant villas, especially towards the river, on the bank of which was Brandenburgh House, a noble mansion, erected by Sir Nicholas Crispe in the reign of Charles I., and occupied by General Fairfax, in 1647, while the parliamentary forces were quartered in the neighbourhood, pending the treaty between Charles and the parliament. It was afterwards the residence of the Margravine of Anspach, and subsequently of Queen Caroline, since whose decease the building has been taken down. The streets are well paved, and lighted with gas, and the inhabitants are supplied with water by the West Middlesex Company, established at Hammersmith by act of parliament, in 1806. The Great Western railway passes through the northern part of the parish, parallel with and close to the Paddington canal; and in the vicinity is also the West London railway, noticed in the article on Kensington. A beautiful suspension-bridge leading to Barnes Common, whence roads branch off to the south and south-west, was erected over the Thames in 1825-7, from a design by Mr. Tierney Clarke, at an expense of £45,000. Here are an extensive iron-foundry and forge for the manufacture of machinery, steam-boilers, and other articles; two breweries; some large nursery-grounds; and grounds for bleaching wax: a great quantity of bricks, also, is made in the neighbourhood. A creek which extends from the Thames to the village is navigable for barges. The petty-sessions for the Kensington division are held here every Monday, and courts leet and baron in November and at Easter. In July, 1843, commodious premises were opened at Brook-Green, for the Hammersmith Police Court.

The living, formerly a perpetual curacy, became a vicarage, under an act passed in 1834, for the separation of the place from the parish of Fulham; net income, £310; patron, the Bishop of London. The church, erected in 1631, is a spacious and neat edifice of brick, with a tower; against the north wall of the nave is a handsome bronze bust of Charles I., erected in grateful remembrance of his royal master, by Sir Nicholas Crispe, whose heart, in pursuance of his directions, was inclosed in an urn and placed underneath it. A second church, dedicated to St. Peter, and containing 1600 sittings, whereof 600 are free, was erected in 1829, on ground given by George Scott, Esq., at an expense of £14,000, of which £2000 were raised by subscription, and the remainder by a grant from the Parliamentary Commissioners. It is a handsome edifice of Suffolk brick, in the Grecian style, with a stone tower surmounted by a cupola, and a good portico of the Ionic order, supporting a triangular pediment. The church has a district annexed, containing 3565 inhabitants, and the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £268; patron, the Bishop of London, who presented the communion-plate. St. Mary's chapel, a neat brick building, was erected in 1813, at the expense of the late Richard Hunt, Esq.: the living is a donative, in the gift of C. E. and R. Hunt, Esqrs. Here are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, Independents, and Wesleyans. A school for boys, now in union with the National Society, was founded in 1624, by Edward Latymer, who gave 35 acres of land, producing a rental of upwards of £540, of which a part is appropriated to the clothing of 30 aged men. There are a Roman Catholic school and chapel at Brook-Green; where also are almshouses for four women, founded and endowed by Thomas Isles, D.D., in 1629. A mechanics' institute and a savings' bank have been established. In Kingstreet is a convent of Benedictine nuns, said to have subsisted since the reign of Charles II.; at the east end of the building is a chapel, which was rebuilt in 1810, at an expense of £1600, defrayed by subscription. Near the parochial church was an ancient mansion, supposed to have been erected at the same time as the palace at Hampton Court, and recently taken down; the apartments in the north part of the building were much admired for the beauty of their architecture.

In a house adjoining the Dove coffee-house, Thomson the poet is thought to have written his Seasons. Catherine, Queen Dowager of Charles II., resided for some years in a house in the Upper Mall, in which Dr. Radcliffe subsequently lived. Among the eminent persons interred here, are, Sir Samuel Morland, the inventor of the speaking-trumpet; Dr. William Sheridan, author of some sermons; Thomas Worlidge, a painter and etcher of great eminence; Sir Elijah Impey, Knt., who was first appointed to the high court of judicature for the British possessions in India; George Doddington, Lord Melcombe, a distinguished courtier and statesman in the reign of George II.; and Arthur Murphy, a barrister, and a dramatic writer of celebrity. Philip James de Loutherburgh, the celebrated landscape painter, resided here.

Hammerton, Green

HAMMERTON, GREEN, a township, in the parish of Whixley, Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 10 miles (W. N. W.) from York; containing 334 inhabitants. The township comprises about 1150 acres; the surface is varied. The village, which is neat, is situated on the road from York to Knaresborough. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Independents.

Hammerton, Kirk (St. John the Baptist)

HAMMERTON, KIRK (St. John the Baptist), a parish, partly in the Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, and partly in the E. division of Ainsty wapentake, W. riding of York, 1 mile (S. E. by S.) from Green-Hammerton; containing 341 inhabitants, of whom 255 are in the township of Kirk-Hammerton. The parish consists of the townships of Kirk-Hammerton and Wilstrop, and comprises 2023a. 9p., of which 78 acres are woodland, and of the remainder, two-thirds arable, and one-third pasture; the soil is very rich. The village is situated about a mile from Skip bridge, a neat structure of three arches, over the river Nidd, and is half a mile distant from the road between York and Boroughbridge; the scenery is picturesque, and the views are extensive. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rev. T. White, the incumbent, with a net income of £150, and a good glebe-house. The church, an ancient edifice with a tower, was enlarged in 1835, at a cost of £100. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hammerwich (St. John)

HAMMERWICH (St. John), a parish, in the union of Lichfield, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 3 miles (S. W. by W.) from Lichfield; containing 239 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the south-eastern verge of Cannock Chase, comprises about 2000 acres, of which about half is uninclosed common, and the remainder mostly arable, with some pasture and meadow. It stands elevated; the soil is very good, and the scenery extensive and beautiful, embracing views of several counties, with Lichfield cathedral and fourteen churches. There is an excellent stone-quarry, the property of William Middleton, Esq., which supplied the material used in the restoration of the cathedral just mentioned. The manufacture of nails is carried on to a small extent. The Wyrley and Essington canal passes through the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy, net income, £70; patrons, certain Trustees; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield. The church is a small structure, standing alone upon a verdant eminence: the rent of five houses and about nine acres of land, amounting to upwards of £30 per annum, is appropriated to keeping the edifice in repair. A Sunday school is in connexion with the church; and there are various benefactions for the poor of the parish.

Hammoon

HAMMOON, a parish, in the union of Sturminster, hundred of Pimperne, Sturminster division of Dorset, 7 miles (S. W. by S.) from Shaftesbury; containing 57 inhabitants. The parish is separated from that of Mansion by the river Stour, and comprises about 630 acres; the soil is generally a fine gravel, and the surface uniformly level. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 4. 2., and in the gift of the Rev. Giles Meech: the tithes have been commuted for £180, and the glebe comprises 22 acres.

Hampden, Great (St. Mary Magdalene)

HAMPDEN, GREAT (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Wycombe, hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 2½ miles (W. N. W.) from Great Missenden; containing 290 inhabitants. This place was anciently the property of the Hampden family, of whom Griffith Hampden entertained Queen Elizabeth here, and, to pay Her Majesty the more honour, cut an avenue through his woods for her more convenient approach to the mansion. The parish comprises 1710 acres, of which about 300 are woodland, 64 waste or common, and the remainder arable and pasture: the soil is partly clay and partly gravel; the surface is hilly, and the scenery pleasing. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Great Kimble consolidated in 1799, valued in the king's books at £9. 9. 7., and until recently in the gift of the Earl of Buckinghamshire. The tithes have been commuted for £295, and the glebe comprises 37 acres. A gallery has been erected in the church, and 100 free sittings provided: among the monuments is one to the memory of the celebrated John Hampden, ornamented with a medallion, on which is a tree with the arms of the family and of their alliances; and having at the foot, in bas-relief, a representation of the action of Chalgrove, in which he received a wound, causing his death about three weeks afterwards.

Hampden, Little

HAMPDEN, LITTLE, a parish, in the union of Wycombe, hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 3¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Great Missenden; containing 83 inhabitants. It comprises 508 acres, of which 47 are waste or common. The living is annexed to the rectory of Hartwell: the tithes have been commuted for £64. 5., and the glebe contains 10 acres.

Hamphall-Stubbs

HAMPHALL-STUBBS, a township, in the parish of South Kirkby, union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 7 miles (N. W.) from Doncaster; containing 23 inhabitants. This township, which, from its contiguity to that of Hampole, was formerly united with it for the support of the poor, comprises about 220 acres. The ancient manor-house, which is situated on an eminence commanding some fine views, was newly fronted in the castellated style, about eighteen years since, with stone obtained within the demesne, a material of very durable texture, and beautifully variegated with fossil shells. A rent-charge of £50 has been awarded as a commutation for the vicarial tithes.

Hampnett (St. George)

HAMPNETT (St. George), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 1½ mile (N. W. by N.) from Northleach; containing 195 inhabitants. It comprises about 1350 acres. The soil is various, consisting of down land, chalk, and clay; the surface is chiefly level, with the exception of some rising grounds on the side of a valley which runs through the centre of the parish. A small brook called the Leach has its rise here, and in its progress gives name to the town of Northleach. The living is a rectory, with that of Stowell united in 1660, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £447; patrons, the Representatives of the late Lord Stowell. The church is principally in the early English style. The old Fosse-way passes along the south-eastern boundary of the parish.

Hampnett, East

HAMPNETT, EAST, a hamlet, in the parish of Boxgrove, union of West Hampnett, hundred of Box and Stockbridge, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex; containing 45 inhabitants.

Hampnett, West (St. Peter)

HAMPNETT, WEST (St. Peter), a parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Box and Stockbridge, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Chichester; containing 520 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Chichester to Arundel, and partly within its limits is Goodwood, the seat of the Duke of Richmond, to whom the manor belongs. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 4. 4.; net income, £52; patron and impropriator, his Grace, whose tithes have been commuted for £420. The church is chiefly in the early English style, with some Norman remains, and a tower at the east end of the aisle; in the north wall of the chancel is a mural monument of Caen stone to Richard and Elizabeth Sackville, whose effigies are sculptured in a kneeling posture: the church was newly pewed in 1838. The poor-law union comprises 37 parishes or places, and a population of 14,157.

Hampole

HAMPOLE, a township, in the parish of Adwickle-Street, union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 6½ miles (N. W.) from Doncaster; containing 120 inhabitants. This was the site of a Cistercian priory, founded in 1170, by William de Clairfai and his wife Avicia de Tarry, for fourteen nuns, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin; the establishment flourished till the Dissolution, when its revenue was £85. 6. 11. There are still some remains of the building, converted into cottages. The township comprises about 1200 acres, of which 150 are in woods and plantations, and the remainder arable and pasture land.

Hampreston (All Saints)

HAMPRESTON (All Saints), a parish, partly within the liberty of Westover, S. division of the county of Southampton, but chiefly in the hundred of Cranborne, union of Wimborne and Cranborne, Wimborne division of the county of Dorset, 3½ miles (E. S. E.) from Wimborne; containing, with the hamlet of Long Ham, 1193 inhabitants. This parish anciently formed part of that of Wimborne, from which it was separated about the year 1440. It is situated on the navigable river Stour, which is its southern boundary, and between the roads leading respectively from Southampton to Exeter and Poole. The area is 4940 acres. The soil is mostly gravelly, and in the valleys a good loam; the cultivated parts, which are chiefly arable, include about two-fifths of the land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 10., and in the gift of E. S. Stanley, Esq.: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £300, and the glebe comprises 60 acres; there is also a rent-charge of £53. 10. paid to certain impropriators. The church is partly in the early and partly in the decorated English style, and has been enlarged with 110 free sittings. There are a place of worship for Independents, and a Roman Catholic chapel; and a convent has been established for 30 nuns under the superintendence of an abbess. A national school has a small endowment.

Hampshire.—See Southampton, county of.

HAMPSHIRE.—See Southampton, county of.

Hampshire-Cross

HAMPSHIRE-CROSS, a hamlet, in the parish of South Tidworth, union and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 144 inhabitants.