Hanley-Castle - Hapsted

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

401-404

Citation Show another format:

'Hanley-Castle - Hapsted', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 401-404. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51004 Date accessed: 01 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Hanley-Castle (St. Mary)

HANLEY-CASTLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Upton-upon-Severn, Lower division of the hundred of Pershore, Upton and W. division of the county of Worcester, 1¼ mile (N. N. W.) from Upton, on the road to Worcester; containing 1677 inhabitants. A castle here was successively possessed by the Nevilles, earls of Warwick, the Despensers, and the Lechmeres; the remains have been converted into a farmhouse. The parish is bounded on the east by the river Severn, and comprises 5684 acres, of a fertile soil, in equal portions of arable and pasture. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 15.; net income, £650, with a glebe-house; patron and impropriator, Sir Anthony Lechmere, Bart. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1795. The church is situated in the village, and is an ancient edifice of brick, with a tower: the interior has lately undergone several repairs. At Malvern-Wells is a separate incumbency. A school was founded by a member of the Lechmere family, and is endowed with land producing an income of £165 per annum, and with a house for the master, now the Rev. Thomas Lloyd, A.M., of Christ-Church, Oxford. There are two exhibitions to Balliol College, Oxford. A school for training female servants was opened in 1840, under the patronage of the Bishop of Worcester. The inmates, females, of six almshouses are supplied with coals and wheat.

Hanley-Child

HANLEY-CHILD, a chapelry, in the parish of Eastham, union of Tenbury, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Tenbury and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 5 miles (S. E. by E.) from Tenbury; containing 170 inhabitants. It consists of 923a. 2r. 8p., of a productive soil and hilly surface, and is intersected by the road from Tenbury to Droitwich. The tithes have been commuted for £140, and there is a glebe of 25½ acres. The chapel stands in an elevated situation three miles south of the parish church, and is a stone structure with a tower: it has been twice struck by lightning.

Hanley-William (All Saints)

HANLEY-WILLIAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Tenbury, Upper division of the hundred of Doddingtree, Tenbury and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 6 miles (S. E. by E.) from Tenbury, on the road to Worcester, viâ Clifton-on-Teme and Martley; containing 136 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south by a portion of Herefordshire, and comprises 1180a. 39p., principally pasture and meadow land. The scenery is very bold, and extensive; the Malvern hills, the Welsh mountains, Clee hill, the Wrekin, and the Clent and Bromsgrove hills, may be all clearly seen on a fine day. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Eastham, and valued in the king's books at £5. 7. 11.: the tithes have been commuted for £155, and the glebe consists of 40 acres. The church, supposed to have been built in 1622, is a small and neat structure, with a wooden spire painted white, and will seat 100 persons: it contains a monument to the memory of the late Col. Newport, of Hanley Court, a handsome mansion in the parish.

Hanlith

HANLITH, a township, in the parish of Kirkby-in-Malham-Dale, union of Settle, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 6 miles (E. S. E.) from Settle; containing 25 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 928 acres, of a tolerably fertile soil. The tithes have been purchased by the landowners.

Hannay, or Hannah (St. Andrew)

HANNAY, or HANNAH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Louth, Wold division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Alford; containing, with the hamlet of Hagnaby, 122 inhabitants. It comprises about 1000 acres of arable and pasture land. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £96; patron, Mrs. Grant: the tithes were commuted for land, under an act of inclosure, in 1811. The church is modern. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hanney, East

HANNEY, EAST, a township, in the parish of West Hanney, union of Wantage, partly in the hundred of Ock, but chiefly in that of Wantage, county of Berks, 3½ miles (N. N. E.) from Wantage; containing 615 inhabitants. It comprises 2056a. 18p. of land, almost entirely arable.

Hanney, West (St. James)

HANNEY, WEST (St. James), a parish, in the union of Wantage, partly in the hundred of Ock, but chiefly in that of Wantage, county of Berks, 3¾ miles (N. by E.) from Wantage; containing, with the townships of East and West Hanney, and the chapelry of Lyford, 1153 inhabitants, of whom 391 are in the township of West Hanney. The parish comprises 4006a. 18p., and is watered by the river Ock, and the Childrey and Wantage brooks: the lands are flat, and the soil deep, black, and peculiarly rich, in some parts clayey; fivesixths are arable, and the remainder meadow. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £22. 12. 6.; net income, £205; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury Cathedral: a tithe rent-charge of £450 is paid to the impropriators, and one of £130 to the vicar. The church is principally of Norman architecture, and contains a monument to Mrs. Elizabeth Bowles, who died at the advanced age of 124 years; likewise several memorials of Knights Templars. At Lyford is a separate incumbency.

Hanningfield, East (All Saints)

HANNINGFIELD, EAST (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Chelmsford, S. division of Essex, 6½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Chelmsford; containing 449 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 2325 acres, of which 1943 are arable, 316 meadow, and about 16 wood and plantation. The soil is a heavy clay, which, by draining and the use of chalk and marl, has been rendered fertile; the surface is generally flat, and was formerly thickly wooded, but more than 500 acres have been cleared, to admit a freer circulation of air. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 15. 7½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. John Nottidge, whose tithes have been commuted for £550, and whose glebe comprises 40 acres. The church is a small edifice, with a tower surmounted by a shingled spire: on the north side of the chancel is a chantry chapel of brick.

Hanningfield, South (St. Peter)

HANNINGFIELD, SOUTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Chelmsford, S. division of Essex, 6 miles (S. S. E.) from Chelmsford; containing 226 inhabitants. It comprises 1305 acres, of which 815 are arable, 407 meadow and pasture, and 83 woodland. The living is a rectory, consolidated in 1785 with that of West Hanningfield, and valued in the king's books at £10: the tithes have been commuted for £360, and the glebe comprises 20 acres. The church is a plain edifice, with a tower surmounted by a spire.

Hanningfield, West (St. Mary and St. Edward)

HANNINGFIELD, WEST (St. Mary and St. Edward), a parish, in the union and hundred of Chelmsford, S. division of Essex, 6 miles (S. S. E.) from Chelmsford; containing 521 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 2787 acres, of which 1774 are arable, 888 meadow and pasture, and 125 woodland. The village is pleasantly situated. The living is a rectory, with the rectory of South Hanningfield consolidated, valued in the king's books at £16. 13. 4.; net income, £934; patrons, the family of Kemble. The church is an ancient edifice, with an octangular tower surmounted by a spire of wood; on the north side of the chancel is a table-monument to the Clovill family, and there are some brasses. The parsonage-house is handsome.

Hannington (St. Peter and St. Paul)

HANNINGTON (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Brixworth, hundred of Orlingbury, N. division of the county of Northampton, 8 miles (N. N. E.) from Northampton; containing 201 inhabitants. It comprises 1202 acres by measurement: the soil in one-half is a rich loam, and in the other a reddish sand; the surface is generally elevated. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Walgrave, and valued in the king's books at £10. 11. 3.: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1802; the land comprises 224a. 2r. 14p. The church contains portions of the Norman style, and of the three successive styles of English architecture; the nave is longitudinally divided into two equal parts by three arches supported by circular piers. Dr. Francis Godwin, Bishop of Hereford, a distinguished antiquary and biographer, was born in 1561, in the parish, of which his father was rector prior to becoming Bishop of Bath and Wells.

Hannington (All Saints)

HANNINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Kingsclere, hundred of Chutely, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 11 miles (S. E. by S.) from Newbury; containing 261 inhabitants, and consisting by measurement of 2000 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 3½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £410, and the glebe comprises 13 acres. The church is a plain structure.

Hannington (St. John the Baptist)

HANNINGTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Cricklade and N. divisions of Wilts, 1¾ mile (W. N. W.) from Highworth; containing 433 inhabitants. The manor has for more than three centuries belonged to the family of Freke, whose residence, Hannington Hall, is still kept up. The parish comprises 4000 acres, and is bounded on the north and north-west by the river Thames, which has its source about 4 or 5 miles from Cricklade, near which place, Hannington bridge over the Thames connects this parish with that of Kempsford, in the county of Gloucester. The pastures are luxuriantly rich, and the dairies noted for the abundance and quality of their produce. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 10., and in the gift of Colonel Freke: the tithes have been commuted for £40, and the glebe comprises 45 acres. The church is an ancient structure, with a western porch in the Norman style, and contains some handsome monuments to the family of Freke. At Hannington-Wick is a chapel, endowed with £10 per annum, part of the produce of land bequeathed by Lady Norton; and the Hannington estates are charged with the payment of £10. 15. annually to the vicar, contingent on the performance of divine service in the chapel, once every Sunday. A school is supported by Lady Norton's bequest, and there are some other bequests.

Hanslope (St. James)

HANSLOPE (St. James), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 4½ miles (N. N. E.) from Stony-Stratford; containing 1553 inhabitants. The parish belonged to William Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, who, in 1293, obtained the grant of a market on Thursday, and a fair commencing on the festival of St. James and to continue for 15 days, both which have been discontinued. The manufacture of lace employs from 500 to 600 women and children: in connexion with the trade are schools where children are taught to work, from the age of five years till eleven or twelve years old, when they are able to support themselves. The London and Birmingham railway passes about a mile to the south-west of the church. There are several quarries which afford materials for building, and for mending the roads; and a fair for cattle is held on Holy-Thursday. The living is a vicarage not in charge, with the living of Castlethorpe annexed; net income, £90; patron, G. Hyde, Esq. The church, which was erected in 1409, by Thomas Knight, clerk, has a lofty tower surmounted by an octagonal fluted spire, rising to a height of 200 feet; the spire was destroyed by lightning in 1804, but has been rebuilt in its original form. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. William Watts, Esq., has built and endowed a school; and there are several charitable bequests, in the aggregate amounting to more than £100 per annum, distributed among the poor of the parish.

Hanthorpe, or Harmthorpe

HANTHORPE, or Harmthorpe, a hamlet, in the parish of Morton, union of Bourne, wapentake of Aveland, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln; containing 151 inhabitants.

Hanwell (St. Mary)

HANWELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Brentford, hundred of Elthorne, county of Middlesex, 8 miles (W.) from London; containing 1469 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the river Brent, and bounded on the west by the Grand Junction canal. Within its limits, also, the Great Western railway is conveyed across the valley of the Brent by a viaduct of chaste and elegant design, 886 feet in length, and 80 feet in height, consisting of 8 elliptical arches 70 feet in span. A station is fixed here, and in the vicinity are very considerable embankments. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the gift of the Bishop of London: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church, built on the site of the former edifice, which, not being large enough for the increasing population, was pulled down, is a very handsome structure, in the Anglo-Roman style, consecrated in April, 1842, and containing about 700 sittings, whereof nearly 300 are free. There is a place of worship for Independents. William Hobbayne, in 1484, gave for charitable uses land then valued at £6 a year, but now producing upwards of £105, of which sum £35 are applied to the support of a school. The Hanwell County Lunatic Asylum, an elegant building lately much enlarged, is within the parochial chapelry of Norwood: it is capable of accommodating 950 inmates. Dr. George Henry Glasse, an eminent classical scholar, who died in 1809, was rector of Hanwell; Jonas Hanway, the traveller and philanthropist, who died in 1786, was buried here.

Hanwell (St. Peter)

HANWELL (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Banbury, hundred of Bloxham, county of Oxford, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from Banbury; containing 297 inhabitants. This place is chiefly remarkable for its castle, supposed to have been built by Wm. Cope, of Banbury, cofferer to Henry VII., and noticed by Leland as the "gallant house of Hanwell." It was a spacious quadrangular building, with massive towers at the angles, of which only one, with a portion of the south front, is at present remaining; it is now a farmhouse, containing in the parlour, dairy, and other parts, some curious arches. The parish comprises about 1400 acres; the soil is generally a reddish loam, the surface rather hilly, and the greater portion in pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 16. 0½.; net income, £320; patron, Earl Delawarr, who is proprietor of the parish: the tithes were commuted for land and cornrents in 1783; the glebe comprises 27 acres. The church is a fine edifice in the decorated English style, with a low embattled tower having an angular turret on the south; the font is Norman.

Hanwood, Great

HANWOOD, GREAT, a parish, in the union of Atcham, liberty of the borough of Shrewsbury, N. division of Salop, 3¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Shrewsbury; containing 167 inhabitants. The parish is situated in a valley, with a considerable ascent to the north and south, and is washed on its western extremity by the Rhe; it comprises by admeasurement 420 acres, about one-fourth of which is pasture, and the rest arable. Twenty or thirty persons are employed in a cottonfactory; and there is a flour-mill where much business is done. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3; net income, £221; patron, H. D. Warter, Esq.: the glebe contains about 30 acres. The present church, a small brick edifice, was built in the beginning of the 18th century: an east window of stained glass has lately been inserted by the patron.

Hanwood, Little

HANWOOD, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Pontesbury, union of Atcham, hundred of Ford, though locally in the parish of Great Hanwood, liberty of the borough of Shrewsbury, N. division of Salop; containing 60 inhabitants.

Hanworth (St. George)

HANWORTH (St. George), a parish, in the union of Staines, hundred of Spelthorne, county of Middlesex, 2½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Hounslow; containing 751 inhabitants. This place was distinguished as the temporary residence of Queen Elizabeth; and at Kempton Park, which is partly in the parish, Nell Gwynne lived for some time. The parish comprises 1325a. 1r. 30p.; the surface is finely varied, and the village pleasantly situated. Fairs, chiefly for pleasure, are held on Easter-Monday, and the first Monday after the 5th of November. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 13. 4.; net income, £451; patron, the Rev. P. P. Bastard. The church, which stands in the park of Henry Perkins, Esq., is a beautiful structure, erected in 1812: the Beauclerk family have a vault in it, containing the remains of some of the dukes of St. Alban's. A national school is partly supported by an endowment of £45 per annum, bequeathed by the Rev. J. Burgess, a late rector.

Hanworth (St. Bartholomew)

HANWORTH (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Erpingham, hundred of North Erpingham, E. division of Norfolk, 5½ miles (N. by E.) from Aylsham; containing 293 inhabitants. The road from Norwich to Cromer passes through. The parish comprises 1351a. 2r. 33p., whereof 900 acres are arable, 259 meadow and pasture, 134 woodland, and the remainder open common. The living is a discharged vicarage, consolidated with the rectories of Gunton and Suffield, and valued in the king's books at £5. 1. 8.; impropriator, Lord Suffield. The great tithes have been commuted for £206. 2. 6., and the vicarial for £105; the vicarial glebe contains 32 acres. The church is in the decorated and later English styles.

Hanworth, Cold (All Saints)

HANWORTH, COLD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Lincoln, E. division of the wapentake of Aslacoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (S. W.) from Market-Rasen; containing 63 inhabitants. It comprises 850 acres; the soil is clayey, cold, and of inferior quality, and the surface is flat. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 10., and annexed to the living of Hackthorn: the glebe comprises 46 acres. The churchyard was formerly surrounded by buildings, as is evident from the number of foundations remaining. A new church has been erected.

Hanworth, Potter.—See Potter-Hanworth.

HANWORTH, POTTER.—See Potter-Hanworth.

Happerton

HAPPERTON, a tything, in the parish of Portbury, union of Bedminster, hundred of Portbury, E. division of Somerset; containing 22 inhabitants.

Happisburgh (St. Mary)

HAPPISBURGH (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Happing, E. division of Norfolk, 7 miles (E.) from North Walsham; containing 631 inhabitants. This parish, which is on the coast, comprises by admeasurement 1953 acres of arable and pasture land, in nearly equal portions. The tower of the church serves as a landmark for mariners; and within a mile of the village are two lighthouses erected in 1791, the one 80 and the other 100 feet high, both furnished with patent lamps and reflectors. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 8.; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Norwich: the great tithes have been commuted for £620, and the vicarial for £230. The church is chiefly in the later English style, and has a lofty embattled tower; the nave, which is lighted by clerestory windows, is separated from the chancel by the remains of a beautifully carved screen, and the font is handsome and curiously sculptured. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship. A national school is supported; and the poor have an allotment of four acres of land, made at the inclosure in 1801. In 1659, by the fall of a cliff into the sea, the skeleton of a large fish was discovered, which appeared to have lain for a very considerable time imbedded in the rock near the summit.

Hapsford

HAPSFORD, a township, in the parish of Thornton, union of Great Boughton, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 4¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Frodsham; containing 102 inhabitants. This township comprises 560 acres: the surface is varied; the soil is partly a marly clay, and partly sand. A rent-charge of £55. 10. has been awarded as a commutation for the tithes.

Hapsted

HAPSTED, a hamlet, in the parish of Ardingley, union of Cuckfield, hundred of Buttinghill, rape of Lewes, E. division of the county of Sussex; containing 159 inhabitants.



<--Previous:
Hamptworth - Hanley
Next:-->
Hapton - Hardley