Hardmead - Harescomb

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

407-409

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'Hardmead - Harescomb', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 407-409. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51006 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


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Hardmead (St. Mary)

HARDMEAD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport, county of Buckingham, 5 miles (N. E. by E.) from Newport-Pagnell; containing 83 inhabitants. It comprises about 1150 acres, of which 650 are pasture, and the remainder arable, with the exception of 4 acres of woodland: the soil for the most part is a cold blue clay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 10½., and in the gift of R. Shedden, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £173. 3. 6., and the glebe comprises 20 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the Norman style of architecture.

Hardraw

HARDRAW, a chapelry, in the parish of Aysgarth, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 18½ miles (W. by N.) from Middleham. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Lord Wharncliffe. The chapel was built about 80 years since. Within the chapelry is a tremendous waterfall, called Hardraw Scarr, with immense masses of rock overhanging it on each side; the water falls from a ledge 100 feet in perpendicular height. During the severe frost in 1740, this cascade was entirely congealed into a stupendous cone of ice.

Hardres, Lower (St. Mary)

HARDRES, LOWER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bridge, hundred of Bridge and Petham, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 3 miles (S.) from Canterbury; containing 252 inhabitants. It comprises 1176 acres, of which 237 are in wood. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 19. 9½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £410, and the glebe contains 13 acres. The church, erected on the site of the ancient building, in 1832, with funds bequeathed by J. Tillard, Esq., of Street-End, in the parish of Petham, is a handsome structure in the early English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a spire.

Hardres, Upper (St. Peter and St. Paul)

HARDRES, UPPER (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Bridge, hundred of Bridge and Petham, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 5 miles (S.) from Canterbury; containing 339 inhabitants. This parish, which is almost the highest ground in the county, is situated on the line of the ancient Stane-street, and comprises 2041a. 20p. The surface is pleasingly varied, and about 600 acres are covered with wood, consisting of oak, beech, birch, ash, &c.; the soil is a heavy loam, resting on chalk, and in general fertile: about 18 acres are planted with hops. The village is on rising ground, commanding an extensive prospect. A new road has been made from Lower Hardres to the church, at the expense of the Rev. E. S. Lumsdaine. The living is a rectory, with that of Stelling annexed, valued in the king's books at £19. 13. 1½., and in the gift of the Heirs of Lady Hardres, and the Rev. E. S. Lumsdaine: the tithes of the parish have been commuted for £440, and the glebe contains about 46 acres. The church is principally in the early English style, and contains several monuments to the Hardres family. Elizabeth Denward, in 1785, gave a dwellinghouse, two schoolrooms, six acres of land, and £30 per annum, for the endowment of a school; in augmentation of which the late Richard Tillard, Esq., left £2000 three per cents. Mrs. Denward also bequeathed £52 for twelve blind persons, £25 for widows, and £18. 18. for bread to be distributed on alternate Sundays at the churches of Hardres and Stelling. The gates of Boulogne, which were presented by Henry VIII. to the knight of Hardres as a testimony of approbation for his accompanying the monarch to France, were about thirty years ago disposed of to a blacksmith by the last proprietor.

Hardwick

HARDWICK, a hamlet, in the parish of Monk-Hesleton, union of Easington, S. division of Easington ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 2½ miles (E.) from Castle-Eden. This place belonged to the convent of Durham, and during its possession by that establishment had a chapel, which was confirmed to the monks by Richard I., and was probably destroyed by the Scots in the reign of Edward II.; the landed endowment was soon afterwards attached to the vicarage of Hesleton. Hardwick House is surrounded by fine plantations and various kinds of forest-trees.

Hardwick, or Hardwicke

HARDWICK, or Hardwicke, a parish, in the union of Wheatenhurst, Upper division of the hundred of Whitstone, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 5 miles (S. W. by S.) from Gloucester; containing 540 inhabitants. The Gloucester and Berkeley canal passes through. The living is a vicarage, consolidated with that of Standish. The church has a low embattled tower at the west end of the south aisle. Hardwicke gives the titles of Baron and Earl to the family of Yorke.

Hardwick

HARDWICK, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Chepstow, Upper division of the hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth; containing 36 inhabitants.

Hardwick (St. Margaret)

HARDWICK (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union and hundred of Depwade, E. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from Stratton; containing 269 inhabitants. It comprises 874a. 1r. 30p., of which 694 acres are arable, and 161 pasture and meadow. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of Shelton, and valued in the king's books at £5: the tithes have been commuted for £267. 13., and there is a glebe of 18 acres. The church is chiefly in the decorated style; the nave is separated from the chancel by the remains of a carved screen: the tower is circular at the base, and octagonal above, but in ruins. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hardwick

HARDWICK, a hamlet, and formerly a parish, in the union and hundred of Freebridge-Lynn, W. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from Lynn; containing 23 inhabitants. The road to London runs through the hamlet, which is united to the living of North Runcton. There were anciently a church, and an hospital for lepers dedicated to St. Lawrence.

Hardwick (St. Leonard)

HARDWICK (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of Orlingbury, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) from Wellingborough; containing 82 inhabitants. The parish is generally elevated, and consists of 1239a. 6p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 17. 6., and in the gift of the Heirs of the late Rev. E. Hughes: the tithes have been commuted for £235, and the glebe contains 27a. 2r. 9p.

Hardwick

HARDWICK, a township, in the parish of Torksey, union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Lawress, but locally in the wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 10½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Gainsborough; containing 65 inhabitants. A small canal, connecting the Foss-Dyke navigation with the river Trent, passes close to the hamlet.

Hardwick

HARDWICK, an extra-parochial liberty, locally in the parish of Hawstead, union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of Suffolk, 1½ mile (S. by W.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 19 inhabitants, and comprising 65 acres. Hardwick House, the handsome seat of Sir T. G. Cullum, Bart., was the residence of Sir John Cullum, uncle of the present proprietor, a learned antiquary, and author of the History of Hawstead, who died here, and was interred in the parish church. There are almshouses for six aged women, originally founded and endowed by Sir Robert Drury, and removed from their ancient site to this place.

Hardwick, with Mitton

HARDWICK, with Mitton, a hamlet, in the parish of Bredon, union of Tewkesbury, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 8 miles (S. by W.) from Pershore; containing 129 inhabitants. It lies on the road from Pershore to Tewkesbury, and comprises 856a. 3r. 26p. of land. The Avon river flows on the west of the hamlet.

Hardwick, East

HARDWICK, EAST, a township, in the parish of Pontefract, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 2¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Pontefract; containing 149 inhabitants. The township is on the road from Pontefract to Doncaster, and comprises about 500 acres of land; the soil varies in quality, but is generally good, and the surface presents a fine open level, inclosed on two sides by the rivers Great and Little Went. The village is small, and the road from Ackworth to Darrington passes through it. Stephen Cawood, in 1653, conveyed to trustees estates for the purpose of erecting and maintaining a chapel and free school, and for other charitable uses; the income is £132, of which £96 are paid to the chaplain, who is also schoolmaster.

Hardwick, Priors (St. Mary)

HARDWICK, PRIORS (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Southam, hundred of Knightlow, S. division of the county of Warwick, 5¾ miles (S. E.) from Southam; containing 280 inhabitants. This was one of twenty-four towns given by Earl Leofric, of Mercia, to the monks of Coventry, in the time of Edward the Confessor. After the Dissolution it came to the Knightleys, who alienated the estate to Sir John Spencer, and Edward Griffin, attorney-general to Queen Elizabeth: it subsequently devolved to Lord Spencer. The parish is bounded on the south and east by a portion of Northamptonshire, and comprises by measurement 1448 acres, of a highly productive soil. Stone of very durable quality is quarried for the roads and for other uses, and facilities of conveyance are afforded by the Oxford canal, the rateable annual value of which property in the parish is £626. The living is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacies of Priors-Marston and Lower Shuckburgh annexed, valued in the king's books at £23. 16. 0½.; net income, £480; patron, Earl Spencer, who, with the Vicar and James Beck, Esq., is impropriator: the glebe comprises 100 acres. The church is an ancient structure, in the early and decorated English styles; the chancel contains some curious details.

Hardwick, West

HARDWICK, WEST, a township, in the parish of Wragby, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 4 miles (S. W.) from Pontefract; containing 102 inhabitants. The township formed part of the demesne of Nostal Priory, to the monks of which it was granted by the Lacy family. It comprises 458 acres, of which 30 are waste or common.

Hardwicke (St. Mary)

HARDWICKE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Aylesbury, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from Aylesbury; containing, with the hamlet of Weedon, 747 inhabitants, of whom 319 are in the township of Hardwicke. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £39. 9. 7.; net income, £645; patrons, the Warden and Fellows of New College, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1801. John Bridle, D.D., in 1781, founded and endowed a school.

Hardwicke (St. Mary)

HARDWICKE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Caxton and Arrington, hundred of Longstow, county of Cambridge, 5½ miles (E. by N.) from Caxton; containing 202 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, in the patronage of the Bishop of Ely, valued in the king's books at £8. 14. 2.: the tithes have been commuted for £248, and the glebe comprises 33 acres. An act for the inclosure of waste lands was obtained in 1836.

Hardwicke

HARDWICKE, a hamlet, in the parish, union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from the town of Abergavenny; containing 96 inhabitants.

Hardwicke

HARDWICKE, a hamlet, in the parish of Ducklington, union of Witney, hundred of Bampton, county of Oxford, 3¼ miles (S. S. E.) from the town of Witney; containing 111 inhabitants.

Hardwicke (St. Mary)

HARDWICKE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 5 miles (N.) from Bicester; containing 80 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 463 acres, of which 212 are arable, 153 pasture, 88 woodland, and the remainder roads. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5; net income, £92; patron, B. Richmond, Esq. The church is a small ancient edifice: at the west end is a large mass of tracery, apparently not connected with any design, and probably collected from different parts of a larger building; there are some good specimens of stained glass in the windows, and the appearance of the whole indicates that the structure is only a portion of a more spacious church.

Hardy, with Chorlton.—See Chorlton.

HARDY with Chorlton.—See Chorlton.

Hareby (St. Peter and St. Paul)

HAREBY (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, W. division of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4¼ miles (W.) from the town of Spilsby; containing 110 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, united in 1739 to the rectory of Bolingbroke, and valued in the king's books at £6. 4. 7.

Harefield (Virgin Mary)

HAREFIELD (Virgin Mary), a parish, in the union of Uxbridge, hundred of Elthorne, county of Middlesex, 4¼ miles (N.) from Uxbridge; containing 1516 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the west by the river Colne, and intersected by the Grand Junction canal, comprises 4534 acres. The soil is dry and rocky in some parts, in others a rich loam alternated with chalk; the surface, with the exception of a considerable tract of moorland, is hilly, and the scenery pleasingly diversified. The works belonging to the Royal Copper-Mines Company are situated in a hamlet here, which, from that circumstance, has its name. Harefield Park is a handsome mansion,' in an ample and richly-wooded demesne, ornamented with a small lake, and comprehending much beautiful scenery. The living is a donative, in the patronage of C. N. Newdegate, Esq., whose family have long appointed their own commissary; net income, £64; impropriator, Sir G. Cooke. The church contains several memorials of the ancient family of Newdegate, and a splendid monument to the memory of Alice, Countess of Derby, who, about 1637, founded and endowed almshouses for six widows. The Knights Hospitallers had a commandery at Harefield, a cell to that of Clerkenwell; the chapel is still standing, and is in the early English style.

Harescomb (St. John the Baptist)

HARESCOMB (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Wheatenhurst, Middle division of the hundred of Dudstone and King's-Barton, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2½ miles (W. by N.) from Painswick; containing 132 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Stroud to Gloucester, and comprises 479a. 15p. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Pitchcomb united, valued in the king's books at £6. 8., and in the gift of R. J. Pernal, Esq.: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £89. 16. 11., and a rent-charge of £23. 18. is paid to certain impropriators; the glebe comprises 15a. 3r. The church is an ancient structure, with a tower and low spire between the nave and chancel.