Haresfield - Harlington

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

409-413

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'Haresfield - Harlington', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 409-413. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51007&strquery=Harford Date accessed: 01 September 2014.


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Haresfield (St. Peter)

HARESFIELD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Wheatenhurst, Upper division of the hundred of Whitestone, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (S. S. W.) from Gloucester; containing 576 inhabitants. This ancient manor enjoys peculiar rights, and is independent of the hundred court; it was united with the manors of Wheatenhurst and Newnham, in conferring the dignity of lord high constable, held by grand serjeantry, from which circumstance its privileges arose. The parish is situated on the Bath and Bristol roads, and comprises, according to computation, 3000 acres. Oolite limestone, of which the church and many of the houses are built, is extensively quarried. The river Severn runs very near the lower part of the parish; and the Gloucester and Berkeley Ship-canal, and the railroad from Gloucester to Swindon, intersect it. Haresfield Court, the seat of J. D. Thomas Niblet, Esq., is a handsome mansion in the Elizabethan style, erected in 1670, on the site of the ancient manor-house, which was surrounded with a moat. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £17; patron and impropriator, Mr. Niblet. The tithes were commuted for land in 1812: the glebe altogether comprises 150 acres, of which the greater part was acquired in lieu of tithe; the glebe-house was rebuilt of stone, in the later English style, by the patron, in 1837. The church, an ancient edifice with a tower surmounted by a spire, appears to have been erected by the prior of Llanthony; it consists of a nave, with north and south porches, and two chancels, of which one belongs to the vicar and the other to the impropriator, and contains some interesting details in the Norman, and early, decorated, and later English styles. On the Beacon Hill, where are the remains of a Roman encampment, coins, chiefly of the Constantine family, have been found at various times; and on the 13th of August, 1837, a vase was turned up by the plough, in which were some thousands of copper coins, now in the possession of the incumbent. Archdeacon Rudge, author of a History of Gloucestershire, was vicar of the parish.

Hareup, or Harehope

HAREUP, or Harehope, a township, in the parish of Eglingham, union of Alnwick, N. division of Coquetdale ward and of Northumberland, 10¼ miles (N. W.) from Alnwick; containing 49 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Eglingham to Chillingham, about a mile north-west of the former place. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £32. 6. 4., and the vicarial for £23. 18. Here are very extensive earthworks and fortifications, probably British.

Harewood (St. Denis)

HAREWOOD (St. Denis), a parish, in the union of Ross, Upper division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 5½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Ross; containing 95 inhabitants. The parish consists of 587 acres of rich land, a great portion occupied by Harewood demesne, and the whole bounded on the west by one of the roads from Hereford to Ross. The living is a donative, in the patronage of Sir H. Hoskyns, Bart., valued in the king's books at £1. 15. 3. The petty-sessions for the division are held here every fourth Tuesday.

Harewood (All Saints)

HAREWOOD (All Saints), a parish, partly in the Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, and partly in the Upper division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York; comprising the townships of Alwoodley, Dunkeswick, Harewood, East Keswick, Weardley, Weeton, Wigton, and part of Wick; and containing 2706 inhabitants, of whom 890 are in the township of Harewood, 8 miles (N.) from Leeds. This place appears to have belonged, soon after the Conquest, to the Romeli family, by one of whom a castle was erected on the acclivity of a hill, at the base of which winds the river Wharfe, about the same time as the foundation of the church. After being for many years the baronial residence of that family, Harewood became the property of Lord Strafford, who, about 1633, obtained for the inhabitants a charter for a weekly market to be held on Monday, a fair to continue 14 days, and two other fairs of one day each. The castle and lands afterwards passed to the Lascelles family, of whom Edwin Lascelles, Esq., ancestor of the earls of Harewood, before he was raised to the peerage, in 1790 abandoned the ancient castle as a residence, and on a spot which he selected on the opposite side of the hill, built the present splendid family seat, at an expense of more than £100,000. The remains of the castle are of stately appearance.

The parish comprises about 12,200 acres, of which 3850 are in the township of Harewood: the portions of arable, pasture, and woodland are nearly equal; the soil is of various qualities, and the scenery in many situations of great diversity and beauty, the higher grounds commanding rich views of the vale of the Wharfe. The village, which is on the road from Leeds to Harrogate, consists of two spacious streets, and has a very handsome appearance, the old houses having been rebuilt in a style of neatness and uniformity; on the south side is the beautiful residence of the Hon. Arthur Lascelles, and on the west is the vicarage-house, surrounded by fine grounds. The market, and the fair for 14 days, have been discontinued; but the two other fairs are held, on the last Monday in April, and the second and last Monday in October. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 1. 10.; net income, £447; patrons, Mrs. Wheeler and the Parishioners; impropriators, the Earl of Harewood, and George Lane Fox, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1790; the glebe comprises about 300 acres. The church was erected in the reign of Edward III., on the site of the former structure, which was built soon after the Conquest; it is a handsome edifice in the decorated English style, and contains several stately monuments to ancient possessors of Harewood, and one to the memory of Sir William Gascoigne, Knt., lord chief justice in the reign of Henry IV., the upright judge who, for an insult offered to the dignity of the bench, committed to prison the Prince of Wales, afterwards Henry V. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Harewood gives the titles of Baron and Earl to the family of Lascelles, that of baron bearing date 1796, and that of earl, 1812.

Harford

HARFORD, a parish, in the union of Plympton St. Mary, hundred of Ermington, Ermington and Plympton, and S. divisions of Devon, 2½ miles (N.) from Ivy-Bridge; containing 193 inhabitants. This parish comprises 2050 acres, of which 1550 are arable and pasture in nearly equal portions, and a very considerable quantity waste, bordering on Dartmoor Forest, and called Harford Moor; the soil of the cultivated land is a light black mould, resting on gravel. The river Erme has its rise on the borders of the parish, through which it flows into Mottecombe bay; and on its banks are a paper-manufactory, and a large flour-mill. Several attempts have been made to stream for tin, but without success; granite is abundant at "Tor Rocks," on the confines of Dartmoor, but there are no regular quarries. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 14. 4½., and in the patronage of T. Sanders, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £180, and the glebe comprises 40 acres. The church is an ancient structure, in the Norman style. There is a place of worship for Independents. William Hart, who suffered severely for his loyalty, was rector in the reign of Charles I.

Hargham (All Saints)

HARGHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Wayland, hundred of Shropham, W. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Attleburgh; containing 93 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1080 acres, of which 500 are arable, 450 pasture and meadow, and 100 woodland: the road from Thetford to Norwich passes through it. Hargham Hall is the seat of Sir Thomas B. Beevor, Bart., lord of the manor. The living is a discharged rectory, annexed to that of Wilby, and valued in the king's books at £4. 4. 2.: the tithes have been commuted for £180, and the glebe comprises 27 acres. The church is in the later English style, and consists of a chancel, and a small portion of the nave; the remainder, with the tower, being in ruins. At the north-eastern extremity of the parish are remains of tumuli, and in the vicinity two Roman urns were found about fifty years ago.

Hargrave

HARGRAVE, a chapelry, in the parish of Tarvin, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 6 miles (S. E. by E.) from Chester; comprising 1271a. 32p. The living is a donative; net income, £100; patrons, Trustees nominated by the parishioners of Tarvin. The tithes have been commuted for £144, and the glebe comprises 8 acres. The chapel, a neat edifice of stone, was erected in 1638, at the expense of Sir Thomas Moulson, alderman of London, who bequeathed estates now producing £202 per annum, for erecting and endowing a chapel and grammar school. The funds having greatly accumulated, by an order of chancery in 1814, a house was raised for the officiating minister, a new building for the school, together with a house for the master, and the chapel, which is dedicated to St. Michael, was enlarged.

Hargrave (All Saints)

HARGRAVE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Thrapstone, hundred of Higham-Ferrers, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3½ miles (W. by N.) from Kimbolton; containing 259 inhabitants. The parish lies on the borders of Huntingdonshire and Bedfordshire, the former bounding it on the east, and the latter on the south; it is near the road from Higham-Ferrers to Kimbolton, and consists of 1378a. 38p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £194; patron and incumbent, the Rev. W. L. Baker. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1802.

Hargrave

HARGRAVE, a parish, in the union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of Suffolk, 6 miles (W. S. W.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 457 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 1108 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 11. 8.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. John White: the tithes have been commuted for £282. 13. 5., and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church is a small edifice in the Norman style, with a tower of brick of later date. The parish is entitled to one-fourth share of the rents of about 75 acres in Cowling, amounting, with other bequests, to about £20 per annum.

Harkstead (St. Mary)

HARKSTEAD (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Samford, E. division of Suffolk, 6½ miles (S. by E.) from Ipswich; containing 338 inhabitants. It comprises 1573 acres, and is situated on the navigable river Stour, by which it is bounded on the south. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 3. 9., and in the gift of the Rev. R. Berners: the tithes have been commuted for £470, and the glebe contains 48 acres. Besides the parochial church, there was formerly a chapel dedicated to St. Clement.

Harlaxton (St. Mary and St. Peter)

HARLAXTON (St. Mary and St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (S. W.) from Grantham; containing 428 inhabitants. This place is of some antiquity, and had a hunting seat, the property of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. The parish is situated on the road from Grantham to Melton, and comprises 2000 acres. Stone of durable quality is quarried for the roads; and facility of conveyance is afforded by the Grantham and Nottingham canal, which passes through the parish. The ancient manor-house has been taken down, and rebuilt in a handsome style. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 6. 10½.; net income, £760; patron, the Prebendary of South Grantham in the Cathedral of Salisbury. The tithes were commuted for land and cornrents in 1795; the land comprises 63 acres. The church is a neat structure, with a tower surmounted by a spire, and consists of a nave and chancel separated by a screen of carved oak. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Harle, Kirk (St. Wilfrid)

HARLE, KIRK (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Bellingham, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland; containing, with the chapelry of Kirkheaton and township of Hawick, 382 inhabitants, of whom 210 are in the township of Kirk-Harle. The manor was anciently held by the knightly family of Harle, from whom it passed to the Strothers, and from them, by marriage, to the Loraines, whose ancestor, Robert, had come to England with the Conqueror, and who were resident here from the time of Henry VI., but sold all their lands in 1837. The parish is near the river Wansbeck, and comprises 5167 acres, of which about 1960, exclusively of the glebe, are in the township of Kirk-Harle. A coal-field extends over nearly the whole of the manor, and freestone and limestone are extensively quarried for the purposes of building and agriculture. The Hall, a mansion standing in a retired situation, in a fine park, was erected by Sir William Loraine, the second baronet, in the beginning of the last century, and has been subsequently improved. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £3. 8. 4., and in the patronage of Thomas Anderson, Esq., who is impropriator of the remainder of the rectorial tithes; it has a net income of £197, and the glebe consists of 156 acres. The church is an ancient edifice consisting of a nave and chancel, together measuring 70 feet in length; some repairs were made at the close of the 17th and beginning of the 18th century, but the main edifice is of the date of Henry IV., about which time it is said to have been in a state of decay, and to have been renovated by the Strother family. Sir William de Herle, chief justice in the reign of Edward III., was born and had lands in the parish; and the well-known landscape gardener, Launcelot Brown, commonly called "Capability Brown," was born at Kirk-Harle in 1715.

Harle, Little

HARLE, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Kirk-Whelpington, union of Bellingham, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 12½ miles (W. by S.) from Morpeth; containing 51 inhabitants. Little Harle Tower, an ancient border fortress, now constitutes part of a handsome and commodious mansion, formerly the property of John Murray Aynsley, a grandson of the fourth duke of Athol, and lately sold by him. The estate was one of the manors of Prudhoe barony, of which it was held, in 1552, by John de Fenwick. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £12. 16. 6., and the impropriate for £1.

Harle, West

HARLE, WEST, a township, in the parish of Kirk-Whelpington, union of Bellingham, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 14½ miles (W. by S.) from Morpeth; containing 38 inhabitants. In the 13th century this place is mentioned as the property of the Harles, in whose possession it continued for some time. The Shaftoes, Widdringtons, and Fenwicks afterwards held it; and in the last century the estate passed into the hands of the Bardon family, by whom it was sold to Lord Charles Aynsley, father of John Murray Aynsley, the late owner. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £16. 16. 6., and the vicarial for £9. 3. 4.

Harleston

HARLESTON, a market-town, in the parish of Reddenhall, union of Depwade, hundred of Earsham, E. division of Norfolk, 19 miles (S.) from Norwich, and 99½ (N. E.) from London; containing 1425 inhabitants. The original appellation of Herolfston, or Herolveston, of which the present is a corruption, was derived from Herolf, one of the Danish leaders, who came over with Sweyn, and settled in this part of the kingdom: in the centre of the town stands a stone, formerly called Herolf's stone. Sir John Herolveston, in the reign of Richard II., quelled a formidable insurrection in Norfolk and the neighbouring counties. The town is situated on the road from Bury St. Edmund's to Yarmouth, about one mile from the river Waveney, over which is a bridge: it is lighted with gas, and well supplied with water from springs. The manufacture of bombazines, and weaving, have been carried on of late years to a limited extent. The market, which is chiefly for corn, is on Wednesday, and is well attended: fairs are held on July 15th and Sept. 9th and 10th; the latter, which is still a large sheep and cattle fair, was originally continued eight days. On December 1st was formerly a fair for Scotch cattle, which lasted one month, and which was removed hither many years since from Hoxne, in Suffolk; but it has fallen into disuse, in consequence of the preference given to the cattle-market at Norwich. A portion of the town is under the superior jurisdiction of the Duke of Norfolk, who is lord of the manor, and has the tolls of the markets and fairs, holding courts for the manor occasionally. The powers of the county debt-court of Harleston, established in 1847, extend over part of the registration-districts of Depwade, Wangford, and Hoxne. Petty-sessions are held on the 1st and 3rd Fridays in the month. In the centre of the town is a chapel of ease, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, which was rebuilt in 1726, and enlarged in 1819 at the expense of the parishioners, by taking in the site of the market-cross, which stood at the east end: the chaplain is nominated by Emmanuel College, Cambridge, pursuant to the direction of Dr. Sancroft, Archbishop of Canterbury, who, in 1688, settled upon that society £54 per annum, now reduced to £30. 18. in trust. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. The rent of an estate in the adjoining parish of Rushall, purchased with £200, the gift of John Dove, who died in 1712, is paid to a national school.

Harleston

HARLESTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Clifton-Campville, union of Tamworth, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 4¼ miles (N.) from Tamworth; containing 221 inhabitants. It comprises about 1400 acres of land: the village is pleasantly seated on an eminence, on the south bank of the Mease, two miles and a half west of the village of Clifton-Campville. The chapel is an ancient building with a low wooden spire; the nave was rebuilt about 20 years ago. The tithes have been commuted for £370.

Harleston

HARLESTON, a parish, in the union and hundred of Stow, W. division of Suffolk, 2½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Stow-Market; containing 90 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 700 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2; net income, £175; patroness, Lady Hotham. The church is a small edifice in the early English style, consisting of a nave and chancel.

Harlestone (St. Andrew)

HARLESTONE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Brixworth, hundred of Newbottle-Grove, S. division of the county of Northampton, 4 miles (N. W.) from Northampton; containing 639 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Northampton to Dunchurch, and comprises by measurement 2450 acres, whereof three-fifths are arable, and two-fifths pasture and woodland; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque. Stone of good quality is quarried for building. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 9. 7.; patron, Earl Spencer; net income, £577, arising from an allotment of 323 acres of land made on the inclosure of the parish, in lieu of tithes: a glebehouse was erected in 1834, at the expense of the patron. The church is partly in the decorated and later English styles, and contains a crypt, sedilia, and a piscina. A school is conducted on the national plan. On Delves Heath are vestiges of an ancient fortification. Sir Salathiel Lovell, one of the barons of the exchequer in the reign of Anne, was buried here.

Harleton (St. Mary)

HARLETON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Wetherley, county of Cambridge, 6½ miles (S. W.) from Cambridge; containing, with the township of Bagley, 269 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 9. 7.; net income, £313; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Jesus College, Cambridge. The parish is entitled to an annuity of £35 from a farm belonging to Christ's Hospital, half of which is paid to the master of a school erected out of the income.

Harley (St. Mary)

HARLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Atcham, hundred of Condover, S. division of Salop, 2¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Wenlock; containing 219 inhabitants. It comprises 2226 acres; the soil is generally light and gravelly, and the surface is level. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 12. 1., and in the gift of the Duke of Cleveland: the tithes have been commuted for £260, and the glebe comprises 44 acres. The Rev. Benjamin Jenks, well known as the author of several favourite works, especially a volume of family prayers, was rector of the parish for 56 years, and was buried in the church in 1724.

Harling, East (St. Peter and St. Paul)

HARLING, EAST (St. Peter and St. Paul), a market-town and parish, in the union and hundred of Guilt-Cross, W. division of Norfolk, 22 miles (S. W.) from Norwich, and 89 (N. E. by N.) from London; containing 1062 inhabitants. This place is situated on a gentle acclivity above the vale of the small river Thet, between the towns of Thetford and Buckenham; the inhabitants are well supplied with water. The Norfolk railway has a station a little to the north of the town, eight miles distant from the Thetford station, and twelve from that of Wymondham. A charter for a market and two fairs was granted in the reign of Edward IV.: the market, held on Tuesday, is abundantly supplied with corn; and there are fairs for live-stock on May 4th, the first Tuesday after Sept. 12th, a fortnight after Michaelmas-day, and Oct. 24th, and a statute-fair for hiring servants a fortnight before Michaelmas-day. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the patronage of Mrs. Wilkinson; net income, £523. The church, erected about the middle of the 15th century, is a handsome structure in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a low spire: the chancel windows are adorned with ancient stained glass removed from the dilapidated mansion of Harling Hall; and adjoining the south aisle is a sepulchral chapel, belonging to the family of Harling, in which is an altar-tomb with the recumbent effigies in marble of Sir Robert Harling and his lady, and various other tombs and memorials. There are places of worship for Baptists, the Society of Friends, and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. At the inclosure, 97 acres were allotted for the repairs of the church, and 57 for the poor.

Harling, West (All Saints)

HARLING, WEST (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Guilt-Cross, W. division of Norfolk, 2¼ miles (W. S. W.) from East Harling; containing 117 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 18. 4., and in the gift of Lord Colborne: the tithes have been commuted for £191, and the glebe comprises 19 acres. The church, an ancient building in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower, is finely situated within the grounds of West Harling Hall, the seat of Lord Colborne; on the floor of the nave are several brasses. At the hamlet of Middle Harling was formerly a distinct parish church, dedicated to St. Andrew the Apostle.

Harlington (St. Mary)

HARLINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Woburn, hundred of Manshead, county of Bedford, 5¼ miles (S.) from Ampthill; containing 521 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11; net income, £171; patron and impropriator, W. D. C. Cooper, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1808.

Harlington (St. Peter and St. Paul)

HARLINGTON (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Staines, hundred of Elthorne, county of Middlesex, 4 miles (N. W. by W.) from Hounslow; containing 841 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the confines of Buckinghamshire, is bounded on the north by the Grand Junction canal, and intersected by the Great Western railway. The surface is generally flat; the lands are chiefly arable, and the soil a rich loam. The scenery is enlivened by handsome seats, among which are Harlington Lodge and Harlington Villa. One wing of Dawley or D'Oyley House, the residence of Bolingbroke, is still remaining, with the whole of the northern wall of the inclosure, more than a mile in extent, against which grows some of the earliest wall-fruit with which the London market is supplied. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24, and in the gift of the Rev. E. Davison: the tithes have been commuted for £696, and the glebe comprises 7 acres. The church is an ancient structure, containing portions in the Norman style, with a square embattled tower; among the details is a very fine Norman doorway in good preservation. In the churchyard is a yew-tree, eighteen feet and a quarter in girth, at the height of four feet from the ground. There is a place of worship for Baptists. This parish, which has been indifferently called Harlington or Arlington, gave the titles of Baron and Earl to the family of Bennett, of whom Henry, the first earl of Arlington, a member of the Cabal cabinet at the Restoration, was born here in 1618.

Harlington

HARLINGTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Barnbrough, union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of the county of York; containing 94 inhabitants.



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