Hatherop - Haughton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

441-444

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'Hatherop - Haughton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 441-444. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51014 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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Hatherop (St. Nicholas)

HATHEROP (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Cirencester, hundred of Brightwells-Barrow, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 3 miles (N.) from Fairford; containing 358 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2000 acres by computation. The soil in some parts is light and sandy, in others a strong clay; the surface is generally level, and the lands are watered by the river Coln. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £274; patron, Lord de Mauley. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1766; the land comprises 300 acres. There is a place of worship for Roman Catholics.

Hathersage, formerly Heather-Edge (St. Michael)

HATHERSAGE, formerly Heather-Edge (St. Michael), a parish, in the unions of Bakewell and Chapel-en-le-Frith, hundred of High-Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 9 miles (N. by E.) from Bakewell; comprising the chapelries of Derwent and Stony-Middleton, the township of Hathersage, and the hamlets of Bamford and Outseats; and containing 2054 inhabitants, of whom 830 are in the township. The parish is situated on the road from Manchester to Sheffield, in a beautiful vale watered by the river Derwent, which abounds with trout. It comprises about 9760 acres, whereof nearly 7000 are moor; the soil is of gritty quality, and the surface diversified with numerous hills. The population is partly employed in the manufacture of wire and needles; there is a cotton-mill at Bamford, and stone is quarried, which is made into mill-stones for the Sheffield market. A fair for sheep is held on the 26th October. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 0. 5.; net income, £126; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Devonshire. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1808; the glebe comprises 216 acres, of which about 170 are moor. The church is in the later English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a lofty and richly crocketed spire: in the chancel are several monuments of the family of Eyre, ancestors of the earls of Newburgh; on an altartomb, represented on brass plates, are effigies of Robert Eyre, who fought in the battle of Agincourt, and of his wife and fourteen children. On the south side of the churchyard is a spot shown as the place of interment of Little John, the favourite companion of Robin Hood. The body of B. Ashton, Esq., who was buried in a vault in the church in 1725, was discovered in 1781, quite perfect and petrified, retaining the flesh colour as when entombed. There are chapels at Stony-Middleton and Derwent; and the Wesleyans and Roman Catholics have places of worship. Eastward from the church is Camp Green, a circular inclosure encompassed by a single mound and moat, evidently of Danish origin. In the vicinity are some irregular rocks, called rocking-stones, or rock basins, and a curious natural cave, called Robin Hood's cave.

Hatherton

HATHERTON, a township, in the parish of Wybunbury, union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 4¼ miles (S. E. by S.) from Nantwich; containing 396 inhabitants. It comprises 1610a. 2r. 20p. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £150, and the vicarial for £27.

Hatherton

HATHERTON, a township, in the parish of Wolverhampton, union of Penkridge, E. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 4 miles (S. E.) from Penkridge; containing 378 inhabitants, and comprising 1664 acres, of which 494 are waste. Part of Calf-heath common is in this township, in which also are the hamlet of Four-Crosses, and several fertile and well-wooded farms. Hatherton Hall, a fine stone mansion, built in 1817, in the Gothic style, is the seat of the Hon. E. R. Littleton, whose father was elevated to the peerage in 1835, by the title of Baron Hatherton, of this place. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £234.

Hatley (St. George)

HATLEY (St. George), a parish, in the union of Caxton and Arrington, hundred of Longstow, county of Cambridge, 4 miles (E. N. E.) from Potton; containing 136 inhabitants. This place was for a long period in the possession of the St. Georges, who had their chief seat and a park here, and held the estate so early as the reign of Henry III. It appears to have been alienated in the 17th century to Sir Robert Cotton, who erected a fine residence on the spot; and afterwards passed to the families of Trefusis and Pearse, from the latter of whom it was purchased about 1782 by Thomas St. Quintin, Esq., whose descendants are the present owners. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of Thomas St. Quintin, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £163. 15., and the glebe comprises 9 acres. The church, built in 1352, contains some interesting memorials of the family of St. George.

Hatley, Cockayne (St. John the Baptist)

HATLEY, COCKAYNE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union and hundred of Biggleswade, county of Bedford, 2 miles (E.) from Potton; containing 99 inhabitants. This place was anciently the property of the Cockaynes, of whom Sir John Cockayne, lord chief baron of the exchequer in the 15th century, made it his country seat; it afterwards came to the family of Cust. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8; patron and incumbent, the Hon. and Rev. H. C. Cust: the tithes have been commuted for £191. 13., and there is a glebe of about 14½ acres. The church is in the later English style, and consists of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a tower surmounted by four pinnacles. The interior is fitted up with finely carved wood-work, collected chiefly in Belgium by the present patron; the pulpit, which is of exquisite Italian workmanship, bears the date 1559, and the principal windows are filled up with painted glass.

Hatley, East (St. Dennis)

HATLEY, EAST (St. Dennis), a parish, in the union of Caxton and Arrington, hundred of Armingford, county of Cambridge, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from Potton; containing 98 inhabitants. The manor was in the time of Edward II. divided between the families of Bereford, Rous, and De Quoye. In the reign of Henry VII. it came to the Castells, who, after a possession of about two centuries, were succeeded by the Downings, of whom Sir George Downing, about 1685, pulled down the old manor-house; the estates are now vested in Downing College, Cambridge. The parish comprises by computation 1360 acres, of which the soil is chiefly clay, and the surface generally level. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 8., and in the gift of the College: the tithes have been commuted for £209. 4., and there are nearly 4 acres of glebe.

Hattersley

HATTERSLEY, a township, in the parish of Mottram-in-Longdendale, union of Ashton-underLyne, hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 10 miles (E. by S.) from Manchester; containing 610 inhabitants. The manor belonged, before the reign of Henry III., to a family of the local name, by one of whom it was conveyed to Sir Roger de Stockport. It continued with the Stockports for about a century, when it became the property of the Carringtons, from whom it passed by a female heir to the Booths; and having descended with Dunham-Massey, it now belongs to the Earl of Stamford and Warrington, who is chief owner of the land. The township lies on the road from Stockport to Sheffield, and comprises 1190 acres, of a clayey soil, in some parts stony. The tithes have been commuted for £95, payable to the Bishop of Chester.

Hatton

HATTON, a township, in the parish of Waverton, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 6 miles (S. E.) from Chester; containing 156 inhabitants. The township comprises 1131 acres, of which the soil is clay. The Chester and Crewe railway passes through it, and the Chester and Nantwich canal has its principal line on the east side. The old mansion of Hatton Hall was blown down a few years ago by a storm; the moat which surrounded it still exists, and several trees of gigantic size and extraordinary girth still survive upon the spot, though stript of their bark, and completely bleached by the assaults of many a wintry blast. A rent-charge of £150 has been awarded as a commutation for the tithes. A clothing club, on a liberal scale, has been instituted by Lord Henry Cholmondeley, for the benefit of his poorer tenants here; and a small lending library is supported by his lordship.

Hatton

HATTON, a township, in the parish and union of Runcorn, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 4¼ miles (S. by W.) from Warrington; containing 382 inhabitants. The manor was given by John de Lacy to Adam de Dutton; and came by marriage with the daughter of Geffrey de Dutton to William Fitzhugh, some of whose descendants, it is probable, assumed the name of Hatton, for about 1290, the manor was divided into severalties among the coheirs of Adam de Hatton. The lands were afterwards held by various families, and the principal part of the township now belongs to William Eccles, Esq. It comprises 1017 acres, of which the prevailing soil is clay: the common lands were inclosed by act of parliament in 1803. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hatton

HATTON, a township, in the parish of Marstonupon-Dove, union of Burton, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 9½ miles (W. S. W.) from Derby; containing 330 inhabitants. It comprises 780 acres of rich land, and has a disconnected ancient-built village. A handsome stone bridge here crosses the Dove into Staffordshire, to Tutbury; it was erected in 1817, is 93 yards in length, and consists of five arches. The road from Derby to Sudbury passes through the village.

Hatton (St. Stephen)

HATTON (St. Stephen), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, E. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3¼ miles (E. by S.) from Wragby; containing 203 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1803a. 1r. 26p.; the soil, with the exception of a small portion of land, is a poor, tenacious clay, and the surface is generally flat. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 10. 10.; net income, £227; patron, Colonel Sibthorp, M. P. £6 per annum, arising from a bequest by Heneage Smith in 1616, are paid for teaching children; and a small donation is distributed in bread.

Hatton

HATTON, a hamlet, in the parish of East Bedfont, union of Staines, hundred of Spelthorne, county of Middlesex, 3 miles (W.) from the town of Hounslow; containing 245 inhabitants.

Hatton

HATTON, a township, in the parish and union of Shiffnall, Shiffnall division of the hundred of Brimstree, S. division of Salop, 2½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Shiffnall; containing 542 inhabitants.

Hatton (Holy Trinity)

HATTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Warwick, Snitterfield division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, 3¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Warwick; containing, with the chapelry of Beausall and hamlet of Shrewley, 954 inhabitants, of whom 340 are in the township of Hatton. This parish comprises 4051a. 2r. 31p., whereof 1259½ acres are in the township of Hatton; of the latter portion, 851 acres are arable, 304 meadow and pasture, 71 woodland, and 34 in homesteads and gardens. The surface is undulated; the soil a gravelly loam, with some portion of strong clay; and the scenery very picturesque. The parish is intersected by the Warwick and Birmingham canal, and by the road between those two towns. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the owner of Pinley Farm for the time being; net income, £265, with a good glebe-house. The church has a tower, and though much altered by repairs, retains some of its ancient features. It was internally richly embellished under the superintendence of the learned Dr. Samuel Parr, who was incumbent from 1783 till his death in 1825. The chancel windows and four others are of stained glass, representing the Crucifixion, the Ascension, St. Peter and St. Paul, Latimer, and Cranmer. In 1722, William Edwards bequeathed a rent-charge of £20 for a school, and other property for the poor.

Hatton, High

HATTON, HIGH, a township, in the parish of Stanton-upon-Hine-Heath, union of Wem, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 7½ miles (E. S. E.) from Wem; containing 201 inhabitants. The vicarial tithes of this township and Booley have been commuted for £78. 10., and the impropriate for £20.

Haugh

HAUGH, an extra-parochial liberty, in the Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (W.) from Alford; containing 10 inhabitants. It comprises 560 acres, of which 470 are arable, 80 pasture, and 10 woodland. The living of Haugh is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £4, and has a net income of £72; the patronage and impropriation belong to the Misses Horsfall. The church is dedicated to St. Leonard.

Haugham (All Saints)

HAUGHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Louth, Wold division of the hundred of Louth-Eske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3¾ miles (S.) from Louth; containing 111 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1360 acres, of which a large portion is woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, now sequestrated, and valued in the king's books at £8. 1. 8.; net income, £151; patron, C. Chaplin, Esq. The church, which had fallen into ruins, was rebuilt in 1841, nearly at the sole expense of the Rev. G. Chaplin, the incumbent, and is a fine specimen of the later English style, having a handsome tower with a crocketed spire, and four ornamented flying buttresses; it is from a design of G. R. Willoughby's, of Louth, and bears a miniature resemblance to the noble church of St. James, in that town. Here was an alien priory, a cell to the Benedictine abbey of St. Mary San Sever, in France, valued at the suppression at twelve marks per annum, and settled upon the Carthusian priory of St. Ann, near Coventry. An intermittent spring, probably connected with some subterraneous reservoir, flows from the side of a hill called Skirbeck, in the parish.

Haughley (St. Mary)

HAUGHLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Stow, W. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from Stow-Market; containing 916 inhabitants. This parish was the head of an honour or barony, under the appellation of Hagenet, and there are still some traces of a very strong castle, supposed to have been of Saxon origin, and which was demolished by Robert, Earl of Leicester, in 1173; the lofty mound that formed its site, and the deep moat by which it was surrounded, are in their original state. Haughley was a place of considerable importance at an early period, and continued to be a market-town till the time of Henry VIII.; but since the rise of Stow-Market it appears to have declined, and the market is now altogether discontinued: a fair, however, is still held on the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. The parish comprises 2497a. 3r. 9p. The Haughley station of the Ipswich and Bury railway is four miles from the Stow-Market station. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 9. 2., and has a net income of £158; the patronage and impropriation are vested in the Trustees of Dr. Triplett's charity. The church is in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower on the south side; the nave is lighted by clerestory windows, and at the west end is a noble window of seven lights, enriched with flowing tracery.

Haughmond Abbey.—See Haghmon Abbey.

HAUGHMOND ABBEY.—See Haghmon Abbey.

Haughton

HAUGHTON, a township, in the parish of Bunbury, union of Nantwich, First division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Nantwich; containing 161 inhabitants. It comprises 1079 acres, of which 28 are waste land or common: two-thirds of the soil are clay, and one-third sand. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £70, payable to the Haberdashers' Company, London.

Haughton

HAUGHTON, a township, in the parish of Manchester, union of Ashton-under-Lyne, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 3¾ miles (N. E.) from Stockport; containing 3319 inhabitants. The name of this place is probably a corruption of High Town, the district being the most elevated part of the parish. The township comprises 1130 acres of land; and is situated on the border of the county, which is here separated from the county of Chester by the river Tame. The manufacture of cotton goods and of hats affords employment to about 750 persons; and abundance of coal is obtained. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Haughton

HAUGHTON, a township, in the chapelry of Humshaugh, parish of Simonburn, union of Hexham, N. W. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 6¼ miles (N.) from Hexham; containing 118 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north and east by the North Tyne, and comprises 1742a. 1r. 39p., of which 1200 acres are pasture and meadow, 441 arable, 87 woodland, and 12 acres roads; the soil is generally good, being a mixture of gravel and fine loam, and the scenery is pleasing, in many parts beautiful, especially on the banks of the river. On a fine eminence stands Haughton Castle, the property and residence of William Smith, Esq., by whose ancestors it was purchased, with the surrounding lands, in 1640; it is a large and strong fabric, surmounted by five square turrets. A papermill, built by the late Mr. Smith, in 1788, employs about 100 people, many of them resident in neighbouring townships.

Haughton, Nottingham.—See Houghton.

HAUGHTON, Nottingham.—See Houghton.

Haughton (St. Giles)

HAUGHTON (St. Giles), a parish, in the W. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, union, and S. division of the county, of Stafford, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Stafford; containing 480 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Stafford to Newport, in one of the most fertile districts of the county, and comprises 1860a. 1r. 15p.; the surface is flat, the air remarkably mild and salubrious, and the soil luxuriantly rich. The village is pleasant and rural, and seated on the road. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 11. 3.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Charles Smith Royds, M.A., of Christ's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted at £300, and the glebe comprises 79 acres of excellent land. The church is in the later English style, with an elegant square tower with pinnacles, and has been much improved and embellished by the present incumbent. A south transept has been added, which is separated from the body of the edifice by an arch of stone. All the windows of the south side of the building, which were of very debased architecture, have been replaced by decorated English windows; and instead of the cottagelike windows in the chancel, a handsome decorated window of four lights has been introduced, the tracery of which is carved out of one solid stone. The flat plaster roof has been removed, and the timbers, being stained and varnished, are now exposed; wooden pendants and crockets, and stone corbels, being added. The western gallery has been lowered, and ornamented; the western door has been entirely renewed, and improved by a stone arch. The aisle has been relaid with octagonal tiles, and a fine organ, keyed, and having three barrels, has been put up. In the church is a curious alabaster mural monument with the black-line figure of an ecclesiastic, Nicholas Cranmer, formerly rector, who died in 1520; he built the tower of the church, gave some of the bells, and erected a private chapel dedicated to St. Katherine, which is now the vestry. A school has been built chiefly at the expense of the rector, who has also provided a master's house; it has a gift of £100 from Mrs. Yonge, relict of the Rev. Vernon Yonge, late rector. There is a Danish barrow in the immediate vicinity; within a few miles is a place called High Offley, where Offa the Dane is said to have dwelt, and the parish contains several houses of very ancient date, surrounded with moats.