Hayle - Hazon

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

454-456

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'Hayle - Hazon', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 454-456. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51018 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


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Hayle and Copper-House

HAYLE and Copper-House, a small sea-port, in the parishes of St. Erth, Phillack, and Uny-Lelant, unions of Penzance and Redruth, hundred of Penwith, W. division of Cornwall, 3½ miles (S. E. by E.) from St. Ives. This port, which is a member of that of St. Ives, is situated on the Bristol Channel; and the village stands on the road from Truro, through Redruth and Camborne, to Penzance. The smelting and refining of copper were formerly carried on to a great extent; but within the last few years the works have been discontinued, from the scarcity of coal in the vicinity, and the ore is now sent for the purpose of being smelted to places where that article is more abundant. A smelting-house for tin is, notwithstanding, still continued, and iron and brass foundries are conducted upon a very large scale; the most splendid steam-engines for the use of the mines are constructed here, and there is also a very extensive flour-mill. Considerable improvements were lately made in the harbour, by the construction of canals and flood-gates; and a grand causeway across an arm of the sea, 1040 feet in length, was completed in 1826, at an expense of £7200. Commodious wharfs have likewise been formed, and every thing requisite done for the despatch of business. The principal trade of the port is in the exportation of copper-ore to Wales, and tin to Bristol; and in the importation of coal, timber, and other articles for the mines, and of groceries and shop goods from Bristol. Vessels of 200 tons' burthen can enter at spring tides, and a steam-packet plies regularly between Hayle and Bristol. Carriages can always pass the sands between the place and St. Ives, from twelve o'clock at noon till one. A railway to Redruth was completed a few years ago, which now forms part of the West Cornwall line. A market is held on Saturday for provisions. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hayling, North (St. Peter)

HAYLING, NORTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Havant, hundred of Bosmere, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2 miles (S. by E.) from Havant; containing 277 inhabitants. This parish, with South Hayling, constitutes Hayling Island, which is bounded on the north and west by Langston harbour, on the east by Emsworth Channel, and on the south by the English Channel. North Hayling comprises 2516a. 9p., of which 877 acres are arable, 133 pasture, 24 wood, chiefly oak and elm, and 155 common; the mud of Langston harbour covers about 1280 acres. The views on the north and east embrace the South Down hills; the surface is flat, and the soil a rich loam. A few men are employed in the salterns. The living is a perpetual curacy, the net income of which is included in that of South Hayling.

Hayling, South (St. Mary)

HAYLING, SOUTH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Havant, hundred of Bosmere, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4½ miles (S.) from Havant; containing 669 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4901a. 2r. 36p.; about 1429 acres are arable, 381 pasture, 53 wood, and 1162 sand and beach, and the mud land in Langston harbour covers 1717 acres. South Hayling has been for some time a watering-place. Its views on the south embrace the British Channel, and on the south-west and west, Spithead, St. Helen's, and the Isle of Wight. A few men are engaged in the salterns, which cover about 37 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 10.; net income, including that of North Hayling, £211; patron and impropriator, Wm. Padwick, Esq.: the glebe contains about 35 acres. There is a place of worship for Independents. The remains of a Roman encampment are visible.

Haynes, or Hawnes (St. Mary)

HAYNES, or Hawnes (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Ampthill, hundred of Flitt, county of Bedford, 4 miles (N. E.) from Ampthill; containing 913 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £8; patron, and impropriator of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, Sir J. Osborn, Bart. The incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £524. 13.

Hayton, with Melay

HAYTON, with Melay, a township, in the parish of Aspatria, union of Wigton, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 7 miles (N. by W.) from Cockermouth; containing 378 inhabitants.

Hayton (St. Mary Magdalene)

HAYTON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Brampton, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland; containing, with the townships of Faugh with Fenton, and Talkin, 1217 inhabitants, of whom 534 are in the township of Hayton, 8 miles (E. by N.) from Carlisle. The village has a neat and respectable appearance. The rivers Gelt, Irthing, and Cairn, flow through the parish; and there is a lake one mile in circumference, called Talkin tarn. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £123; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. The church, rebuilt by subscription in 1780, is a neat edifice, containing a marble tablet in memory of Sir James Graham, Bart., and another to several of the Grahams of Edmund Castle.

Hayton (St. Peter)

HAYTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of East Retford, North Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 3 miles (N. E. by N.) from East Retford; containing 281 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the east bank of the river Idle, and comprises by admeasurement 2263 acres, of which 1517 are in the township of Hayton. A ridge of high land runs on the east of the village. On the west, at the distance of about one and a half mile, is the hamlet of Tiln, comprising about 746 acres, and in which was a church, long since gone to decay; the grounds in this part of the parish are low, and intersected by the Chesterfield canal. A small pleasurefair is held on the 6th of July. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 15. 5.; patron, the Archbishop of York; impropriator, H. Barber, Esq.: the great tithes have been commuted for £178, and the small for £84; the glebe contains about 37 acres. The church is an ancient structure with a lofty tower: in the churchyard are three full-length stone figures, said to represent members of the family of Hayton, whose mansion stood near the vicarage-house. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Hayton (St. Martin)

HAYTON (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing, with the chapelry of Bielby, 485 inhabitants, of whom 212 are in the township of Hayton, 2 miles (S. E. by S.) from Pocklington. A very ancient mansion stood here, in which Charles I., when proceeding to demand possession of Hull, then occupied by the parliamentary forces under Sir John Hotham, was splendidly entertained by Sir Walter Rudston, who for his hospitality was created a baronet on the 16th of August, 1642. Sir Thomas, the third baronet, dying without issue, the title became extinct, and the estate devolved on his sister, from whom it has descended to its present owner. The township comprises 1850 acres, of which 1340 are arable, 500 pasture, and 10 woodland; the soil is a rich loam upon gravel, and the scenery around diversified and pleasing. The village is situated on an acclivity of the road between York and Hull, and through it runs a small rivulet; the Pocklington canal, which communicates with the river Ouse, terminates a mile and a half from it. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 0½.; patron, the Dean of York. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £326. 7. 9., and the vicarial for £80, exclusive of a payment of £26. 5. by Sir Charles Anderson, Bart., and there are 60 acres of vicarial glebe: in Bielby are 90 acres of glebe. The church, which stands on a bold eminence, is a handsome edifice, with a tower surmounted by a good spire, and contains some portions of ancient workmanship. At Bielby is a chapel of ease. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists.

Haywood

HAYWOOD, a hamlet, in the parishes of BurghWallis, Campsall, and South Kirkby, union of Doncaster, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of the county of York; containing 61 inhabitants.

Haywood-Forest

HAYWOOD-FOREST, an extra-parochial liberty, in the hundred of Webtree, county of Hereford, 2½ miles (S. S. W.) from Hereford; containing 123 inhabitants. The district comprises 711 acres, and is intersected by the Hereford and Grosmont railway.

Haywood, Great

HAYWOOD, GREAT, a township, partly in the parish of Colwich, and partly in that of Stowe, S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, union, and N. division of the county, of Stafford, 4 miles (N. W.) from Rugeley; containing 765 inhabitants. The village, which is of neat appearance, is on the Lichfield and Stafford road, and on the Trent and Mersey canal, at the point where the latter is joined by the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal. Here is an extensive wharf; also a paper and a corn mill.

Haywood, Little

HAYWOOD, LITTLE, a township, in the parishes of Colwich and Stowe, S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, union, and N. division of the county, of Stafford, 3½ miles (N. W.) from Rugeley; containing 519 inhabitants. The township has a neat village, near which the river Trent is crossed by the Horse bridge. This bridge anciently consisted of 42 arches, all of wood; but having been long decayed, it was rebuilt in 1833: it is only broad enough to admit foot-passengers and horses.

Haywood-Oaks

HAYWOOD-OAKS, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Mansfield, Southwell division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 6 miles (S. E.) from Mansfield; containing 12 inhabitants, and comprising 666 acres.

Haywood-Township

HAYWOOD-TOWNSHIP, an extra-parochial liberty, in the Upper division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford. It comprises 780 acres of land, intersected by the Hereford and Grosmont railway; and on the north-west is connected with Haywood-Forest.

Hazeleigh, or Haseley (St. Nicholas)

HAZELEIGH, or Haseley (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Dengie, S. division of Essex, 2¾ miles (S. S. W.) from Maldon; containing 131 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 900 acres, of which 700 are arable, 130 pasture, and 70 woodland and plantations. Haseley Hall, the ancient manor-house, is situated near the church. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4., and in the patronage of H. S. Blake and B. Kerr, Esqrs.; net income, £258. The church is of timber frame-work and plaster.

Hazeley-Heath

HAZELEY-HEATH, a tything, in the union of Hartley-Wintney, partly in the parish of HartleyWintney, hundred of Odiham, but chiefly in that of Heckfield, hundred of Holdshott, Odiham and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2 miles (W.) from Hartford-Bridge; containing 314 inhabitants.

Hazlebadge

HAZLEBADGE, a lordship, in the parish of Hope, union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 5½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Stony-Middleton; containing 52 inhabitants.

Hazlerigg

HAZLERIGG, a township, in the parish of Chatton, union of Glendale, E. division of Glendale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 6 miles (N. E.) from Wooler. It lies about midway between the roads from Wooler to Berwick, and from Alnwick to Wooler, and comprises 2100 acres, of which three-fourths are arable land of middling quality upon freestone. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £53. There are some remains of an old peel-house.

Hazleton (St. Andrew)

HAZLETON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Northleach, hundred of Bradley, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Northleach; containing 286 inhabitants, of whom 193 are in the hamlet of Hazleton. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 5. 5., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £383. There is a chapel of ease at Yanworth.

Hazlewood

HAZLEWOOD, a township, in the parish of Duffield, union of Belper, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 6 miles (N.) from Derby; containing 344 inhabitants. The township lies on the road from Duffield to Wirksworth, and comprises 1330 acres, of which 200 are arable, 1047 pasture, 30 woodland, and 53 acres roads. A tributary of the Derwent, on which is a mill at this place, passes through. The village is about a mile and a half north-north-west from that of Duffield, and contains a number of scattered houses. Hazlewood Hall lies near the eastern extremity of the township. A church in the early English style, with a bell-gable, was built in 1845, partly by the Church Commissioners: a district has been assigned to it; and there are a parsonage, and schools. The living is in the gift of the Bishop of Lichfield.

Hazlewood

HAZLEWOOD, an extra-parochial district, locally in the parish of Tadcaster, Upper division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 3¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Tadcaster; containing 190 inhabitants. This place, with Stutton, forms a township, comprising about 2610 acres, of a rich limestone soil. Hazlewood Hall, a fine old mansion, is pleasantly seated on a lofty eminence, commanding very extensive views; and near it is a Roman Catholic chapel with two painted windows, and having several handsome monuments to the Vavasours.

Hazlewood, with Storiths

HAZLEWOOD, with Storiths, a township, in the parish and union of Skipton, Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Skipton; containing 220 inhabitants. The township is situated east of the river Wharfe, on the road from Skipton to Ripley, and comprises by computation 1800 acres of rough pasture and moorland; the soil is shallow, resting on gritstone. A free school was founded in 1700, by the Winterburn family, and has £15 per annum from Silvester Petyt's charity.

Hazon

HAZON, a township, in the parish of Shilbottle, union of Alnwick, E. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 7½ miles (S. by E.) from Alnwick; containing 85 inhabitants. To the west of this place runs the road between Alnwick and Morpeth, and on the south-east is the river Coquet. The tithes have been commuted for £187 payable to the impropriator, and £36. 3. to the vicar.



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