Hill-Croome - Himbleton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

512-514

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'Hill-Croome - Himbleton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 512-514. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51032 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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Hill-Croome, Worcester.—See Croome, Hill.

HILL-CROOME, Worcester.—See Croome, Hill.

Hill-Deverill (St. Mary)

HILL-DEVERILL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Warminster, hundred of Heytesbury, Warminster and S. divisions of Wilts, 3 miles (S.) from the town of Warminster; containing 118 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £10. 4. 2.; net income, £69; patron, the Prebendary of Hill-Deverill.

Hill-End

HILL-END, a tything, in the parish of Cumner, union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormer, county of Berks, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from the city of Oxford, near the road to Witney; containing 103 inhabitants.

Hill-Farrance (Holy Cross)

HILL-FARRANCE (Holy Cross), a parish, in the union of Wellington, hundred of Taunton and Taunton-Dean, W. division of Somerset, 4¼ miles (W.) from Taunton; containing 564 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £153; patrons, the President and Fellows of Trinity College, Oxford; impropriator, Francis Popham, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £142. 5., and those of the curate for £124. 6.; the glebe comprises 13 acres of land.

Hill-Hampton.—See Hampton, Hill.

HILL-HAMPTON.—See Hampton, Hill.

Hill-Top

HILL-TOP, a township, in the parish of Wragby, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 5 miles (S. E.) from the town of Barnsley; containing 92 inhabitants. The township includes part of the village and suburbs of Wragby, and several scattered hamlets.

Hillam

HILLAM, a township, in the parish of MonkFrystone, Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (N. N. E.) from Ferry-Bridge; containing 342 inhabitants. It comprises by computation nearly 1500 acres. The substratum abounds with limestone of good quality, which is extensively quarried; the commons were inclosed in 1797, and the land has been brought into good cultivation. Hillam Hall is a handsome structure in the Elizabethan style, situated in grounds commanding fine views over the adjacent country. The York and North-Midland railway passes through the township. There is a place of worship in the village for Wesleyans.

Hillesden (All Saints)

HILLESDEN (All Saints), a parish, in the union, hundred, and county of Buckingham, 3¾ miles (W. by S.) from Buckingham; containing 262 inhabitants. This place was formerly the property of the Denton family, of whom Sir Alexander Denton, Knt., during the parliamentary war, garrisoned his manor-house for the king; it was, however, taken by assault and plundered, in 1644. The manufacture of lace affords employment to many females. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £64; patrons, the Dean and Canons of ChristChurch, Oxford, in whom the tithes are vested. The church, which was rebuilt in 1493, is a handsome structure, in the later English style; in the chancel are several fine monuments to the Denton family.

Hillesley

HILLESLEY, a tything, in the parish of Hawkesbury, union of Chipping-Sodbury, Upper division of the hundred of Grumbald's-Ash, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 1¾ mile (S. S. E.) from the town of Wotton-under-Edge; containing 566 inhabitants. It lies on the road from Wotton to Bath. Here was anciently a chapel dedicated to St. Giles.

Hillingdon (St. John the Baptist)

HILLINGDON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Uxbridge, hundred of Elthorne, county of Middlesex, 13½ miles (W. by N.) from London; containing, with the market-town of Uxbridge, and the district of Uxbridge-Moor, 9246 inhabitants, of whom 3219 are in Uxbridge. Hillingdon House, the residence of Mr. Cox, was partly destroyed by fire in February 1844; the drawing-room, in which the Queen had been entertained to luncheon about three weeks previously, was destroyed: the damage was estimated at £15,000. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £16; net income, £489; patron, the Bishop of London; appropriator, the Bishop of Worcester: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1812. The church is principally in the later English style, with an embattled tower at the west end, and contains, among others, a fine monument to the memory of Henry, Earl of Uxbridge, who died in 1743: in the churchyard is the tomb of John Rich, comedian, who died in 1761. At Uxbridge and Uxbridge-Moor are separate incumbencies.

Hillington (St. Mary)

HILLINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Freebridge-Lynn, W. division of Norfolk, 7½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Lynn; containing 321 inhabitants. This parish, which is the property of Sir W. J. H. B. Ffolkes, Bart., lord of the manor, comprises by measurement 2529 acres, whereof 1833 are arable, 537 pasture, and 126 woodland; the soil is chiefly chalk, alternated with sand, and the lower grounds are watered by a very pure stream, which rises in the parish, and bounds it on one side. Hillington Hall, the seat of the lord of the manor, is a stately mansion, beautifully situated in a richly-wooded park; it was originally erected in 1627, and has been much enlarged and improved by its present proprietor, who has added to it a noble hall, staircase, and library. The petty-sessions for the division are held in the village every month. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the gift of Sir W. Ffolkes: the tithes have been commuted for £440, and the glebe comprises 60 acres. The church is chiefly in the early English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains some still more ancient details, among which is a Norman doorway of great beauty. The poor are entitled to one-half of the proceeds of thirty-one acres of land, bequeathed by F. Callibutt, in the reign of Henry VIII. On an eminence commanding an extensive view, are the remains of Belmont House, a large mansion commenced by Sir James Johnstone, but never completed.

Hillington, or Halagston (St. John the Baptist)

HILLINGTON, or Halagston (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Loddon, E. division of Norfolk, 6¾ miles (S. E.) from Norwich; containing 64 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, in the gift of W. A. Gilbert, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £120, and the glebe comprises 12 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style, with a circular tower, and enriched doorways on the north and south sides, the former of which has been built up.

Hillmarton (St. Lawrence)

HILLMARTON (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Calne, hundred of Kingsbridge, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts, 3¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Calne; containing, with the tything of Catcomb, 806 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the Oxford road, comprises 4000 acres, chiefly in pasture; the soil of the arable land is fertile, producing good average crops: the surface is generally level, but undulated in some parts. There are some quarries of building-stone, and clay is obtained for making bricks. The living is a vicarage, endowed with part of the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £20. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriators of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, the landowners. The incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £493. 2. 2., and the impropriate for £84. 1. 2.; there are nearly 7 acres of glebe. The church is in the later English style; the tower has been rebuilt, at the expense of T. Poynder, Esq. Here is a place of worship for Independents.

Hillmorton (St. John the Baptist)

HILLMORTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Rugby, Rugby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 2 miles (E. S. E.) from Rugby; containing 953 inhabitants. The manor, after the Conquest, belonged to Sir Thomas de Astley, by whose family it was sold to Mr. Vere, merchant, of London; and after passing through other hands, it was purchased by the daughter of Lady Grey de Ruthyn, who conveyed it by marriage to the Marquess of Hastings, by whom the advowson was sold and the estate divided. The parish is situated on the borders of Northamptonshire, and on the road from Coventry to Northampton; and comprises by computation 3450 acres of a rich and fertile soil, of which two-thirds are pasture, and one-third arable. It is intersected by the Oxford canal, and the London and Birmingham railway, the rateable annual value of the former property being £1010, and of the latter £1909. In the parish is a capital fox-cover. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 10. 6.; net income, £270; patron, Robert Stanley, Esq.: the glebe comprises 30 acres. The church is a very ancient structure in the Norman style, and contains monuments to Sir Thos. de Astley, and Lady Edith, his mother. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Baptists; and a parochial school has an endowment of £16 per annum.

Hillside, with Stapeley.—See Hillside.

HILLSIDE, with Stapeley.—See Hillside.

Hilperton (St. Michael)

HILPERTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union and hundred of Melksham, Westbury and N. divisions, and Trowbridge and Bradford subdivisions, of Wilts, 1¼ mile (N. E.) from Trowbridge; containing 973 inhabitants. It comprises 1078a. 3r. 36p. The soil in the central part is a light black loam, and in the northern and southern portions a light-coloured sandy clay; both kinds are fertile, and produce good crops: the surface is varied with hill and dale, and the lower lands are watered by the Avon. Stone, chiefly for the roads, is quarried. The manufacture of fine broad-cloth and kerseymeres is carried on to some extent; and the Kennet and Avon canal, which passes through the parish, affords facilities of conveyance. A fair for horses, cattle, pigs, and pedlery, is held on the second Monday after Trinity. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £16, and in the patronage of the family of Long: the tithes have been commuted for £260, and the glebe comprises 27 acres. The church is an ancient structure. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Hilsea

HILSEA, a hamlet, in the parish of Wymering, union of Fareham, hundred of Portsdown, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 227 inhabitants.

Hilston (St. Margaret)

HILSTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Patrington, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 14 miles (E. by N.) from Hull; containing 41 inhabitants. This place has been variously written; in Domesday book it occurs as Heldoveston, and at subsequent periods is called Hildofston and Hildeston. The parish comprises by survey 578 acres, of which about 350 are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the soil is of a clayey quality. The village is situated about a mile from the sea. A little to the north of it is Hilston Mount, a considerable eminence, on which is an octagonal tower of light brick, with a circular turret on its northern side, surmounted with a flag-staff and vane, and well known as a landmark for mariners; the prospect is very extensive. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5; net income, £50; patron and incumbent, the Rev. C. Sykes. The church is a small structure in the early English style, simple and massive, with some fine Norman remains, including a doorway on the north of the nave, which has a zigzag moulding.

Hilton

HILTON, a township, in the parish of Marstonupon-Dove, union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 8¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Derby; containing 723 inhabitants. The township comprises 1620 acres of land, and has a large and pleasant village on the Derby and Uttoxeter road. The Wakelyn is an ancient half-timbered mansion, with gables, and curiously ornamented. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. A school-house was erected about 1655, by Arthur and Thomas Harrison; and in 1781 the commissioners of inclosures allotted land now producing £31. 10. per annum for the support of a master. Attached to the Established Church is an infant school.

Hilton (All Saints)

HILTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Whiteway, Blandford division of Dorset, 7½ miles (W. S. W.) from Blandford; containing, with the hamlets of Aller, Anstey, and part of Hartsfoot-Lane, 730 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated about three miles to the north of the road from Blandford to Dorchester, comprises by measurement 3006 acres, whereof about 300 are woodland, 1300 acres orchards, gardens, and waste, and the remainder arable, meadow, and pasture. The soil is generally heavy, producing excellent wheat; in some parts it is chalk alternated with gravel. Bog-iron, and bituminous schist or slate coal are found in abundance; also good brick clay of a blue colour, in which are oyster-shells nine inches in diameter, large scallop and muscle shells, cornua ammonis, mineralized wood, and a quantity of pyrites. Curious fossils have been discovered in the flint rocks, with some chalcedony and carmelite: on the side of a chalk hill were found the bones, teeth, and tusks, of the mammoth; the bones were of great size, but mouldered on being touched. Specimens of iron-ore, dug at Belchalwel, near this place, have been analyzed, and found to contain four grains of gold in the pound weight. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 10. 5.; patron, the Bishop of Salisbury; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter: the great tithes have been commuted for £255, and the vicarial for £100; the glebe comprises six acres. The church is a light and handsome structure in the later English style, apparently replacing one of older date, as the interior contains many details of Norman character; there are paintings of the Twelve Apostles rudely executed on oak panels, said to have been removed from Melton Abbey, in the vicinity. On Bulbarrow Hill, the highest in the neighbourhood, is a circular double intrenchment, supposed to be of Danish formation. Within the parish are some mineral springs, the water of which possesses calcareous and ferruginous properties.

Hilton

HILTON, a township, in the parish of Staindrop, union of Teesdale, S. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 2½ miles (N. E.) from Staindrop; containing 112 inhabitants. The township comprises 1088a. 2r. 10p., of which the soil is fertile and productive: it was the residence of the Hilton family for several generations, but is now the property of the Duke of Cleveland. The village occupies a fine situation, commanding very extensive prospects. The tithes have been commuted for £136.

Hilton (St. Mary Magdalene)

HILTON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of St. Ives, hundred of Toseland, county of Huntingdon, 3½ miles (S. S. W.) from St. Ives; containing 344 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1280 acres, principally arable; there are 29 acres of common or waste land: the soil is chiefly clay alternated with gravel, and the surface generally flat. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Fen-Stanton. The church is in the later English style.

Hilton

HILTON, a township, in the parish of Wolverhampton, union of Penkridge, in the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 4½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Wolverhampton; containing 57 inhabitants, and comprising by survey 790 acres. This township consists of Hilton Park and three farms. The park abounds with all the varieties of sylvan and picturesque beauty, displayed in groves, clumps, and plantations, all in a thriving state, and mostly planted by the late Mr. Vernon. The Hall is a large structure of brick and stone, erected in 1700: it is surrounded by a moat, which is crossed by a handsome stone bridge. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £131. Here was anciently a chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist; and a Cistercian abbey, in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary, was founded in 1223, by Henry de Audley, the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, was estimated at £89 10. 1.

Hilton, Westmorland.—See Helton.

HILTON, Westmorland.—See Helton.

Hilton-In-Cleveland

HILTON-IN-CLEVELAND, a parish, in the union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Stokesley; containing 126 inhabitants. This place, called in the Domesday survey Hiltune, at an early period gave name to a resident family; in the reign of Henry III., Adam de Hilton was lord, and since that time various families, including the Meinells, Morleys, and Lowthers, have held possessions in the parish, which is at present the property of the Hon. Frederick Cavendish. The parish is separated from that of Kirk-Leavington by the river Leven, and comprises 1336a. 2r. 22p., of which 973 acres are arable, 308 meadow and pasture, and 38 woodland. The surface is rather hilly on the south side, and for the most part level on the north, and the general scenery is picturesque; the soil is a strong gravelly clay of great fertility, and the lands in tillage produce abundant crops. The village is on the road from Stokesley to Yarm, and commands an extensive prospect towards the north. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £50; patron, the Hon. F. Cavendish: the tithes have been commuted for £12. 12. The church, situated in the centre of the village, and formerly a chapel of ease to Rudby, is a small ancient structure.

Himbleton (St. Mary Magdalene)

HIMBLETON (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Droitwich, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Droitwich and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Droitwich; containing, with Shell, extra-parochial, 481 inhabitants. The parish consists of 2174a. 2r. 1p. of fertile land, well wooded; two-thirds are pasture, and the rest arable. It is watered by the Bow rivulet; and on the north-west is skirted by the Birmingham and Worcester canal, close to which the Birmingham and Gloucester railway passes. There are several good fox-covers. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 10½.; net income, £110; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester. The tithes were commuted for land in 1779. The church stands near the village, and from its rude appearance must be of ancient date.

Himley (St. Michael)

HIMLEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the hundred, of Seisdon, S. division of the county of Stafford, 3¾ miles (W.) from Dudley; containing 409 inhabitants. It comprises 1185½ acres, of which 600 are park surrounding Himley Hall, and the remainder arable. The surface is undulated, the soil good, and the scenery pretty; and the village, which is pleasant, is situated on the road from Stourbridge to Wolverhampton: the inhabitants are entirely agricultural. Courts leet and baron are held annually, and there is a copyhold court. The Hall, a splendid mansion in the Italian style, standing in the midst of a rich and extensive park, is the seat of Lord Ward, relative of the gifted Earl of Dudley, late the owner, who died in 1833; several of the apartments are spacious, elegantly decorated, and enriched with valuable pictures. In the grounds are a magnificent sheet of water, and many picturesque eminences, rising gradually towards the horizon, and finely clad with ancient and modern foliage. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Lord Ward: the tithes have been commuted for £316, and the glebe comprises 15 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a neat brick edifice, erected in 1764, by the first lord Dudley and Ward. A large parochial school is supported by Lord Ward; and the poor have the produce of 3½ acres of land, purchased with several benefactions in 1681.