Holtby - Holy-Island

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

537-539

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'Holtby - Holy-Island', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 537-539. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51040 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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Holtby (Holy Trinity)

HOLTBY (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the wapentake of Bulmer, union and N. riding of York, 5 miles (E. N. E.) from York; containing 146 inhabitants. The parish comprises 848 acres, of which 600 are arable, 25 woodland, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the surface is slightly undulated, and the soil of a light and loamy quality. Some portions of the scenery are picturesque. The road to Bridlington passes through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of Lord Faversham: the tithes have been commuted for £184, and the glebe comprises 51 acres, with a good house attached. The church is a neat brick edifice, fully repaired in 1841.

Holtby, with Ainderby-Myers, in the county of York.—See Ainderby-Myers.

HOLTBY, with Ainderby-Myers, in the county of York.—See Ainderby-Myers.

Holton (All Saints)

HOLTON (All Saints), a parish, in the W. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 2½ miles (N. N. W.) from Wragby; containing, with Beckering, 191 inhabitants, and consisting of 1800 acres by computation. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 10. 10.; net income, £334; patron, C. Turnor, Esq.: the glebe comprises 27 acres. The church is ancient.

Holton (St. Bartholomew)

HOLTON (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Headington, hundred of Bullingdon, county of Oxford, 1 mile (N. E.) from Wheatley; containing 289 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south-east by the river Thame, and comprises by computation 1600 acres, whereof 970 are pasture, 460 arable, and 162 woodland. Its soil is generally a fine loam resting upon stiff clay, and in the higher parts has a substratum of oolite rock. The ancient mansion was taken down in 1804, and a handsome structure built on a different site, by Elisha Biscoe, Esq.; it is surrounded by a park of 148 acres, inclosed with a stone wall, and richly embellished with timber. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 19. 2., and in the patronage of the Biscoe family; net income, £390. The church is a cruciform structure, with a chapel attached to the north aisle, and another to the south; the latter, which appears to be the less ancient, was built by William Brome, who in 1461 was buried in a vault underneath it. In the parish register is recorded the marriage of Ireton to Bridget, daughter of Oliver Cromwell, which took place June 15th, 1646, in the mansion-house of the Whorwood family, to whom the estate was conveyed by marriage with the heiress of George Brome.

Holton (St. Nicholas)

HOLTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Whitley, though locally in that of Horethorne, W. division of Somerset, 2¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Wincanton; containing 224 inhabitants. It is situated on the road between London and Exeter, and comprises 491a. 1r. 38p., of which about 367 acres are pasture, 58 arable, and 49 orchard. The surface is diversified with hill and dale, agreeably interspersed with ash, oak, and elm; the soil is sandy and silicious, resting on clay, and in addition to the ordinary agricultural crops, dairy-stock is reared to some extent. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 0. 1., and in the gift of the family of Plucknet: the tithes have been commuted for £110, and there are 38a. 3r. 29p. of glebe.

Holton (St. Mary)

HOLTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Samford, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Stratford St. Mary; containing 187 inhabitants, and comprising 837 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 14. 7., and in the gift of Sir Joshua Rowley, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £310, and the glebe comprises 35 acres, with a house. A school-house, built on the waste, was conveyed by Sir Francis Mannock, Bart., to trustees, in 1749; and in 1758, by the exertions and pecuniary aid of the Rev. Mr. White, then rector, a school was endowed, the income of which is £35 per annum.

Holton (St. Peter)

HOLTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 1¼ mile (E. N. E.) from Halesworth; containing 541 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Halesworth to Beccles, comprises by admeasurement 1132 acres; the soil is strong and favourable to the growth of corn. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £197: the glebe comprises 3 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the Norman style, with a round tower.

Holton-Le-Clay (St. Peter)

HOLTON-LE-CLAY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Louth, wapentake of Bradley-Haverstoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (S. S. E.) from Great Grimsby; containing 263 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 8. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriator, the Earl of Scarborough. The great tithes have been commuted for £4, and the vicarial for £6. 5. 8.; the glebe contains one acre.

Holton-Le-Moor

HOLTON-LE-MOOR, a parish, in the union of Caistor, N. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3½ miles (S. W.) from Caistor; containing 160 inhabitants. It comprises 1812 acres, of which 453 are waste or common; some of the most sterile parts have been covered with plantations. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 18. 4., and until lately, for a long period, annexed to the living of Caistor. The church is a small edifice.

Holverstone (St. Mary)

HOLVERSTONE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 6 miles (S. E.) from the city of Norwich; containing 37 inhabitants, and comprising 348a. 2r. 18p. The living is divided, one part being held with the rectory of Burgh-Apton, one with that of Hillington, and another with that of Rockland: the church has been demolished.

Holway-Extra-Portam

HOLWAY-EXTRA-PORTAM, a tything, in the parish of St. Mary Magdalen, borough and union of Taunton, hundred of Taunton and Taunton-Dean, W. division of Somerset; with 125 inhabitants.

Holwell

HOLWELL, a parish, in the union of Hitchin, hundred of Clifton, county of Bedford, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Hitchin; containing 182 inhabitants, and consisting of 550 acres by computation. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 9. 7.; net income, £120, arising from 120 acres of land given in lieu of tithes in 1802; patron, F. P. D. Radcliff, Esq. The church, an ancient structure in the early English style, has been partly rebuilt and restored. There is property at East Greenwich, bequeathed to the parish by Mr. Rand, in 1706, and now producing £700 per annum, for the apprenticing of children; with the accumulated savings, a school, a house for the incumbent, and six almshouses, were built in the year 1831, by an order in chancery.

Holwell

HOLWELL, a hamlet, in the parish of Shitlington, union of Ampthill, hundred of Clifton, county of Bedford; containing 58 inhabitants.

Holwell (St. Lawrence)

HOLWELL (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Sherborne, hundred of Brownshall, county of Dorset, 5¾ miles (S. E. by E.) from Sherborne; containing 397 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 2217 acres: limestone is quarried for manure. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 9., and in the gift of Queen's College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe comprises 50 acres. The church is a neat edifice in the later English style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Here stood the principal lodge of the ancient forest of Blackmore, which William de Bret and his successors held by service as the king's forester in Blackmore; the office became extinct when the district was disafforested.

Holwell

HOLWELL, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Cranborne, union of Wimborne and Cranborne, Wimborne division of Dorset; with 407 inhabitants.

Holwell

HOLWELL, a chapelry, in the parish of Ab-Kettleby, union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 3¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 156 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Leonard. There is a chalybeate spring in the neighbourhood.

Holwell

HOLWELL, a chapelry, in the parish of Broadwell, union of Witney, hundred of Bampton, county of Oxford, 2 miles (S. W. by S.) from Burford; containing 115 inhabitants. It comprises 1044 acres by computation, of which 24 are pasture, 30 woodland, and the rest arable. The chapel is a very old building, with a Norman door on the north side.

Holwick

HOLWICK, a township, in the parish of RomaldKirk, union of Teesdale, wapentake of GillingWest, N. riding of York, 12½ miles (N. W.) from Barnard-Castle; containing 205 inhabitants. It comprises 5910 acres, chiefly moorland and fells, and includes the hamlets of Unthank and Lonton, on the Tees: the village, which is scattered, is near the head of Teesdale. The tithes were commuted for land in 1811.

Holybourne (Holy Rood)

HOLYBOURNE (Holy Rood), a parish, in the union and hundred of Alton, Alton and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 1 mile (N. E.) from Alton; containing 522 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 1350 acres. The living is a vicarage not in charge, annexed, with the livings of Binsted and Kingsley, to the vicarage of Alton: the tithes have been commuted for £260 payable to the Dean and Chapter of Winchester, £95 to the vicar, and £45 to an impropriator. The church has been enlarged, and 120 free sittings provided. Thomas Andrews, in 1619, devised estates for the erection and support of a free school: the net annual income is nearly £200, and the number receiving instruction is about eighty.

Holy-Cross

HOLY-CROSS, a hamlet, in the parish of Clent, union of Bromsgrove, Lower division of the hundred of Halfshire, Stourbridge and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from Stourbridge. This is a small village near Lower Clent, and on the road from Stourbridge to Bromsgrove. It is noted for its fairs, which are very considerable, and are held on April 11th, and Sept. 12th, chiefly for hornedcattle and cheese. There is a place of worship for a congregation of Baptists.

Holy-Cross, hundred of Pershore, Worcestershire.—See Pershore.

HOLY-CROSS, hundred of Pershore, Worcestershire.—See Pershore.

Holyfield

HOLYFIELD, a hamlet, in the parish of Waltham-Abbey, or Holy Cross, union of Edmonton, hundred of Waltham, S. division of Essex, 2½ miles (N. by E.) from the town of Waltham-Abbey; containing 382 inhabitants. This place, with Upshire, comprises 7934 acres, of which 166 are common or waste land. The impropriate tithes of the two hamlets have been together commuted for £915.

Holyhatch

HOLYHATCH, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union and hundred of Fordingbridge, Ringwood and S. divisions of Hants; containing, with Ogdens, 30 inhabitants. This district is situated on the borders and within the limits of the New Forest.

Holy-Island anciently Lindisfarn (St. John the Evangelist)

HOLY-ISLAND, anciently Lindisfarn (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union of Berwick, in Islandshire, N. division of Northumberland, 5½ miles (N. by E.) from Belford, and 10 (S. E.) from Berwick; containing 1209 inhabitants. The Island, forming the chief part of the parish, is situated in the North Sea, a mile and a half from the Northumbrian coast, and derives its name from an abbey founded by Oswald, King of Northumbria. This abbey became the seat of a see; but after a succession of fourteen prelates, of whom St. Cuthbert was one, the cathedral was destroyed by the Danes, in 893, and the bishopric was removed to Chester-le-Street, and subsequently to Durham. The island was invaded and plundered by Malcolm I., King of Scotland, in 941. After the Norman Conquest, a Benedictine priory was established (as a cell to that of Durham), the revenue of which at the Dissolution was £60. 5.: its foundations may be traced over a space of nearly four acres, but the only considerable remains are those of the church, a noble cruciform structure, displaying in the nave, choir, and part of the central tower, the Norman and early English styles of architecture. In the great civil war the isle was the station of a parliamentary garrison; and in 1715 it was seized by the adherents of the Pretender, who were, however, soon dislodged by a detachment from the king's troops at Berwick.

Besides the principal island, the parish comprises the Farn Islands, and the hamlets of Fenham and Goswick on the main land. At the south-western angle of Holy Island is situated the village, distinguished for the ruins of the monastery; it is a place of considerable resort for sea-bathing, and there are several fishing-boats belonging to it, with about 70 men, employed in catching cod, ling, haddock, and lobsters, which are sent in large quantities to the London market. There is also a curing and smoking house for herrings, which are taken in great numbers along the coast. The south-eastern extremity of the island rises in a conical peak, sixty feet in height, on the summit of which is a castellated fort, built during the reign of Elizabeth, and still occupied by the crown. The north side abounds with limestone; and there are also a small seam of coal, and a stratum of slate, the latter containing a considerable quantity of iron-ore, with which are found the entrochi, or fossils popularly termed St. Cuthbert's beads. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £207; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Durham: the impropriation belongs to the crown and others. The church is a small neat edifice.



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