Huntingfield - Hurleston

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

588-591

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'Huntingfield - Hurleston', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 588-591. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51055 Date accessed: 24 July 2014.


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Huntingfield (St. Mary)

HUNTINGFIELD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from Halesworth; containing 397 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 2000 acres. Huntingfield Hall, now the property of Lord Huntingfield, while in the possession of Lord Hunsden, was honoured by a visit from Queen Elizabeth, who was entertained with great splendour by that nobleman; in the park is an oak which was a favourite tree with the queen, and from which it is said that she shot a buck with her own hand. The living is a rectory, with that of Cookley united, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £800; patron, Lord Huntingfield. There is a glebe of about 120 acres, with a good house, considerably improved by the Rev. Henry Uhthoff. The church is chiefly in the early English style: the produce of certain town lands, £60 per annum, is partly applied to its repairs.

Huntingford

HUNTINGFORD, a tything, in the parish of Wotton-under-Edge, union of Dursley, Upper division of the hundred of Berkeley, W. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 59 inhabitants.

Huntington

HUNTINGTON, a township, in the parish of St. Oswald, Chester, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Chester; containing 143 inhabitants. The township comprises 1380 acres, of a clayey soil, and is bounded on the west by the river Dee, which is crossed by a ferry to Eccleston.

Huntington

HUNTINGTON, a parish, in the borough of Hereford, hundred of Grimsworth, union and county of Hereford, 2½ miles (W. N. W.) from the city of Hereford; containing 115 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Holmer: the appropriate tithes have been commuted for £85. 15., and £57 are paid to the vicar of Holmer.

Huntington

HUNTINGTON, a parish, in the union of Kington, hundred of Huntington, county of Hereford, 4½ miles (W. S. W.) from Kington; containing 262 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the river Arrow, and situated on the borders of Wales, comprising by computation 2120 acres; the pastures are luxuriantly rich, and the dairy-farms under excellent management. Fairs for horses, sheep, and cattle, are held on the 18th of July and 13th of November. The living is a rectory, united with the vicarage of Kington. The church is an ancient structure, said to have been built with the materials of an adjoining castle, formerly a place of great strength, the baronial residence of the Bohuns. There is a place of worship for Independents. A school was endowed in 1791, by Edward Goff, Esq., with five small tenements and £1000 in money: the income is £118.

Huntington

HUNTINGTON, a township, in the parish of Cannock, union of Penkridge, E. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 3¼ miles (E.) from Penkridge, on the road to Stafford; containing 121 inhabitants. The township comprises upwards of 900 acres of land, a large portion of which was inclosed about thirty years since. It adjoins the western side of Cannock Chase, and is celebrated for its white gravel, considerable quantities of which are sent to different places for garden-walks, &c. Nearly the whole township is the property of Lord Hatherton.

Huntington (All Saints)

HUNTINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the wapentake of Bulmer, union and N. riding of York; containing 652 inhabitants, of whom 490 are in the township, 3 miles (N. N. E.) from York, on the road to Sheriff-Hutton. This parish, which is bounded on the west by the river Foss, consists of the townships of Earswick, Huntington, and Towthorpe, and comprises by measurement 4830 acres, of which one-third is arable, and the remainder, with the exception of about 50 acres of woodland, meadow and pasture. Earl De Grey is lord of the manor, and there are several resident proprietors of estates: the village, which is neat, is seated on the east side of the river. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5; net income, £127; patrons and appropriators, the Sub-Chanter and Vicars Choral of the Cathedral of York.

Huntisham

HUNTISHAM, a township, in the parish of Goodrich, poor-law union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford; containing 127 inhabitants.

Huntley (St. John the Baptist)

HUNTLEY (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Westbury, duchy of Lancaster, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 7 miles (W. by N.) from Gloucester; containing 511 inhabitants. It is situated on the road between Gloucester and Ross, and comprises by admeasurement 1409 acres, of which 736 are meadow and pasture, 380 arable, 139 wood, and 154 waste: the soil rests chiefly on limestone, intermixed with red and blue clay, gravel, and marl. The scenery is richly wooded, and fine views are obtained from some of the elevations, of the Cotswold, Malvern, and Bredon hills, the mountains of South Wales, the Severn, Bristol Channel, &c. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 5. 10.; patron, R. Capper, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £240. 11., and the glebe comprises 48 acres, with a house. The church is in the later English style, and has been enlarged at a cost of £500, defrayed chiefly by the rector; it has 370 sittings.

Huntley

HUNTLEY, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Cheadle, S. division of the hundred of Totmonslow, N. division of the county of Stafford, 1½ mile (S.) from Cheadle. The village is pleasantly situated on the road from Cheadle to Uttoxeter.

Hunton (St. Mary)

HUNTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Maidstone, hundred of Twyford, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 5 miles (S. W. by S.) from Maidstone; containing 740 inhabitants. This place, in the reign of Henry III., belonged to Nicholas de Lenham, who obtained for the inhabitants the grant of a weekly market and an annual fair for five days, both which have long fallen into disuse. The manor afterwards passed to the Gyffords, and in the reign of Edward III. to the family of Clinton, of whose ancient mansion, the site, encompassed by a moat, is still visible near the church. On Midsummer-day, 1746, and on Aug. 19th, 1763, two of the most awful and destructive storms ever recorded in the country occurred in this and the neighbouring parishes. The parish consists of 2061a. 3r. 8p., a large portion of which is appropriated to the cultivation of hops of fine quality, and the growth of fruit for the London market; the soil is chiefly clay. There are 386 acres of wood, and the surface is watered by the river Beult, which falls into the Medway at Yalding. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 13. 1½., and in the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury: the tithes have been commuted for £900, and the glebe comprises 24 acres, with a house. The church, to which a gallery has been added at the expense of the rector and parishioners, is a very neat edifice, containing a fine bust of H. Hatley, Esq., by Roubilliac, and some handsome monuments of the Fanes, whose old family seat at Burston is now a farmhouse, and its chapel desecrated. Beilby Porteus, 22 years rector of the parish, successively Bishop of Chester and of London, and celebrated for his universal benevolence, bequeathed £1000 three per cent. consols. for teaching children here. A stratum of petrified shells in marl was discovered in the parish, in the year 1683.

Hunton (St. James)

HUNTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Winchester, hundred of Buddlesgate, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5½ miles (S. by E.) from Whitchurch; containing 111 inhabitants. This was formerly a chapelry in the parish of Crawley St. Mary; it comprises 1029 acres. The living is annexed to the rectory of Crawley: the tithes have been commuted for £190.

Hunton

HUNTON, a chapelry, in the union of Leyburn, partly in the parish of Hornby, wapentake of Hang-East, but chiefly in the parish of Brompton-Patrick, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 6 miles (S. by E.) from Richmond; containing 534 inhabitants. The township is situated north of the Newton beck, and comprises about 1855 acres: the village, which is large, lies on both sides and near the confluence of two streams. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Bishop of Chester; impropriator, C. H. Elsley, Esq. The chapel, dedicated to St. John, is a plain edifice, consecrated in 1794.

Huntsham

HUNTSHAM, a parish, in the union and hundred of Tiverton, Cullompton and N. divisions of Devon, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Bampton; containing 157 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated in a very retired part of the county, far from any public road, comprises by measurement 1859 acres, chiefly of a poor clayey soil; about 771 acres are pasture, 757 arable, and 330 woodland. The surface is varied, the scenery generally pleasing; and the river Lowman, which falls into the Exe at Tiverton, has its source in the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 12. 11.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. E. B. Troyte: the tithes have been commuted for £182, and the glebe comprises 62 acres. The church is a small edifice, completely covered with ivy, and forming a picturesque feature in the landscape; it has a tower at the west end.

Huntshaw (St. Mary Magdalene)

HUNTSHAW (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Torrington, hundred of Fremington, Braunton and N. divisions of Devon, 3 miles (N. N. E.) from Torrington; containing 296 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 7. 1., and in the gift of Lord Clinton: the tithes have been commuted for £190, and the glebe comprises 36 acres. John Lovering, in 1671, bequeathed £200 to purchase lands, a part of the proceeds to be applied in teaching children.

Huntspill (All Saints)

HUNTSPILL (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, partly in the hundred of Bempstone, but chiefly in that of Huntspill and Puriton, W. division of Somerset, 6 miles (N. by E.) from Bridgwater; containing 1643 inhabitants. It borders on the Bristol Channel, and comprises 6615a. 1r. 1p., of which 4939 acres are meadow and pasture, 835 arable, and 170 orchards. The surface is flat, and the soil a deep rich loam; the chief produce is cheese. The river Parret, at the mouth of which the parish is situated, is navigable for vessels of considerable burthen; and the Bristol and Exeter railway, and the Axbridge and Bridgwater road, also afford facilities of conveyance. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £72. 5. 5., and in the gift of Balliol College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £684. 6., and the glebe comprises 49 acres, with a house. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style. A district church, dedicated to All Saints, was built in 1839, containing 230 free sittings, the Incorporated Society having granted £130 in aid of the expense; the funds, with this exception, were supplied by the rector, the parishioners, and the patrons of the parish living. Here is a place of worship for Baptists. Beautiful marine shells, of the Wentletrap and Helix species, abound among the sedge by the sea-side.

Huntstill

HUNTSTILL, a hamlet, in the parish of ChiltonTrinity, union of Bridgwater, hundred of North Petherton, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing 22 inhabitants.

Huntwick, with Foulby and Nostal

HUNTWICK, with Foulby and Nostal, a township, in the parish of Wragby, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Pontefract, near the road to Wakefield; containing 152 inhabitants. Huntwick is a mile and a half north, and Foulby about half a mile west, of the church; they consist of 2 farms and some cottages.—See Nostal.

Hunwick, with Helmington

HUNWICK, with Helmington, a township, in the parish of St. Andrew Auckland, union of Auckland, N. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 3½ miles (N. W. by N.) from BishopAuckland; containing 338 inhabitants. It is situated on the bank of the Wear, and comprises about 1560 acres of land. A district chapel dedicated to St. Paul has been erected; the district consists of this township and part of that of Newton-Cap, and is bounded on the east and south by the river Wear. A fine mineral spring, much resorted to in cases of indigestion, became dry in 1842, owing to the sinking of a coal-pit.

Hunworth (St. Lawrence)

HUNWORTH (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Erpingham, hundred of Holt, W. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (S. S. W.) from Holt; containing 234 inhabitants. This parish, situated in a picturesque dell, comprises 838a. 1r. 28p., of which 494 acres are arable, 52 pasture and meadow, 48 woodland, and 68 heath and common. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Stody, and valued in the king's books at £4: the tithes have been commuted for £148, and the glebe contains 22½ acres. The church is in the early and later English styles, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a south transept, and a square embattled tower.

Hurcott

HURCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of Ilton, union of Chard, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of Somerset; containing 12 inhabitants.

Hurdcott

HURDCOTT, a hamlet, in the parish of Baverstock, union of Wilton, hundred of Cawden and Cadworth, Hindon and S. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 58 inhabitants.

Hurdsfield

HURDSFIELD, a township, in the parish of Prestbury, union and hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester; adjoining the town of Macclesfield on the east, and containing 3551 inhabitants. This township, the lower end of which is in the borough of Macclesfield, comprises about 859 acres, consisting of pasture, with a little arable, and some woodland, and plantations of Scotch larch and firs; the surface is hill and dale, and the soil clay and sand, and stony. Coal and stone are obtained; and there are several silk manufactories and dye-works, employing a vast number of hands: the establishment of Messrs. Brocklehurst and Company is the largest in the township. The Macclesfield and Chapel-en-le-Frith road, and the Macclesfield canal, pass through. A very neat church, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, and in the pointed style, was consecrated in 1837; the cost of its erection was about £3000. The living is a perpetual curacy, with an income derived from pew-rents, and £1000 in the funds; patrons, Hindmarsh's Trustees. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and infant and Sunday schools are in connexion with the church.

Hurleston

HURLESTON, a township, in the parish of Acton, union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 2½ miles (N. W.) from Nantwich; containing 192 inhabitants. It comprises 1342 acres, the soil of which is sand and clay. A branch of the Chester canal passes through the township. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £83. 5., and the vicarial for £32. 3. 2.