Hurley - Hutton-Bonville

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

591-594

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'Hurley - Hutton-Bonville', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 591-594. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51056+ Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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Hurley (St. Mary)

HURLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Cookham, hundred of Beynhurst, county of Berks, 4¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Maidenhead; containing 1119 inhabitants. A Benedictine priory was founded here in the reign of William the Conqueror, by Godfrey de Mandeville, and dedicated to the Virgin Mary; it flourished, as a cell to the abbey of Westminster, till the Dissolution, when its revenue was estimated at £134. 10. 8. The site was afterwards occupied by a mansion called Lady Place, in a vault beneath which were held the meetings of the confederate lords for promoting the Revolution of 1688, among whom Lord Lovelace distinguished himself. On a tablet in the vault are recorded the visits of William III., George III. and his consort, and the celebrated General Paoli, to this dark recess. The adjoining stable was the refectory of the priory, the windows of which are still remaining. The parish is situated on the river Thames, and comprises 4096 acres, of which 174 are common or waste; the soil is chiefly clay and sand, with small portions of chalk, and the surface is diversified with hills covered with rich plantations of beech and other timber. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 6½.; patron and impropriator, Sir E. G. C. East, Bart.: the great tithes have been commuted for £289, and the small for £250; the vicar has a glebe of one acre. The church, supposed to have been the chapel belonging to the priory, is an ancient structure, displaying many details of early Norman architecture. At Knowle Hill, a district deriving its name from an eminence near the out portions of the parishes of Hurley and Wargrave, a church has been built by subscription, aided by a grant of £200 from the Incorporated Society; it is a neat edifice in the later English style, and contains 415 sittings, of which 268 are free. The living is in the gift of the Vicar.

Hurley

HURLEY, a hamlet, in the parish of Kingsbury, union of Tamworth, Tamworth division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 2 miles (E.) from the village of Kingsbury; containing 604 inhabitants.

Hurn

HURN, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Christchurch, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Christchurch; containing 482 inhabitants.

Hursley (All Saints)

HURSLEY (All Saints), a parish, and the head of a union, in the hundred of Buddlesgate, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Winchester; containing 1520 inhabitants. The parish formed part of the ancient manor of Merdon or Merden, in the Saxon chronicles called Mrantune, and supposed to be the place where Cynewulph, King of the West Saxons, who had succeeded Sigebert on the throne, was assassinated by Ceynard, the brother of that monarch, whom he had driven into exile. The living is a vicarage, with that of Otterbourne annexed, valued in the king's books at £9, and in the gift of Sir William Heathcote, Bart.; the appropriation belongs to Winchester Cathedral. The great tithes of the parish have been commuted for £1341, and the glebe contains 161 acres; the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £260, and the glebe contains nearly two acres, with a house. At Amphield is a separate incumbency. Hursley Park was the residence of Richard Cromwell, son of the Protector; and in pulling down the old manor-house, in the early part of the last century, the seal of the Commonwealth, which Oliver Cromwell took from the parliament, was discovered in one of the walls. The poor-law union of Hursley comprises four parishes, which contain 2592 inhabitants.

Hurst (St. Nicholas)

HURST (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wokingham, hundreds of Charlton and Sonning, county of Berks, 3½ miles (N. N. W.) from Wokingham; containing, with the liberties of Newland, Winnersh, Whistley-Hurst, and Broad Hinton, 2339 inhabitants. Hurst House is an ancient mansion, originally built by Ward, treasurer to Queen Elizabeth, and forming an interesting specimen of the domestic architecture of that period. It was subsequently inhabited by Sir John Harrison and his son, Sir Richard, and was afterwards the residence, for many years, of the Queen of Bohemia; the royal arms, emblazoned in stained glass, still embellish the window of the hall. The estate of Bearwood is the property of the Walter family, of whom the late John Walter, Esq., who died in July, 1847, greatly improved the vicinity: Mr. Walter was the principal proprietor of The Times newspaper, which, under his management during a period of forty years, attained its present eminence. The parish comprises 6471 acres, of which 71 are common or waste; it is intersected by the Great Western railway. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Oxford; net income, £150: the tithes have been commuted for £1540. The church contains handsome monuments to the memory of Margaret, wife of Sir Henry Savile, founder of the Savilian professorship at Oxford; and Sir Richard Harrison, who twice raised at his own expense a troop of cavalry for the service of Charles I. A second church, dedicated to St. Catherine, was consecrated in April, 1846. It stands upon the most commanding point of the elevated range occupied by the mansion and demesne of Bearwood, and near the borders of the parish of Wokingham, and is an exquisitely finished specimen of the decorated style. The cost of the erection and endowment was about £9000, to which the Walter family, who are the patrons, largely contributed. An hospital was founded by William Barker, who died in 1685, for eight persons. Dorothy Harrison, in 1690, gave £7 per annum for instruction; and Edward Polehampton, in 1721, erected a chapel, schoolroom, and dwelling-house, which he endowed with £40 a year, for a clergyman to officiate in the chapel, and teach ten boys.

Hurst (St. Leonard)

HURST (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of East Ashford, partly within the liberty of Romney-Marsh, but chiefly in the hundred of Street, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 5½ miles (W.) from Hythe; containing 40 inhabitants. It comprises 459 acres. The Grand Military canal passes through. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 18. 4., and in the patronage of Mrs. Carter; income, £55. The church being in ruins, the inhabitants attend service at Aldington, which is situated to the north, between Hurst and the South-Eastern railway.

Hurst

HURST, an ecclesiastical parish, in the division of Hartshead, parish and union of Ashton-under-Lyne, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 1 mile (N. E.) from Ashton-under-Lyne; containing about 4500 inhabitants. This parish was constituted under the provisions of the act 6th and 7th of Victoria, cap. 37. It is on the old road from Ashton to Mossley, and forms a circle whose radius is about half a mile; the land is all pasture, and stands high, commanding fine views of the country around, especially in a western and south-western direction. Coal is abundant, and several cottonmills are in operation. In the village of Higher Hurst, a suburb of the town of Ashton, is the manufacturing establishment of the Messrs. Whittaker, commenced about forty years ago by the late John Whittaker, Esq., and now carried on by his sons, who have enlarged, and propose further to extend, the buildings, already among the largest cotton-factories in the kingdom, and at present employing 1300 hands. The gardens and pleasuregrounds around the dwelling-houses of these gentlemen have been greatly improved by tasteful culture, and attract the attention of visiters. The village of Hurst-Brook, which in 1442 was the patrimony of Nicholas de Hyrst, and for more than three centuries was an obscure rural spot, has, owing in part to its vicinity to Ashton, become a considerable place, having a population of several hundred persons, and containing two cottonmills.

The church, dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, was commenced in 1847, on a site presented by the Earl of Stamford and Warrington. It stands near Hurst Cross, another small village in the parish, and at the junction of four roads, and has accommodation for 645 persons, 495 seats being free; the cost of erection is estimated at £2476. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Crown and the Bishop of Manchester, alternately; net income, £150; incumbent, the Rev. J. H. Greenwood, who, previously to the church being built, performed divine service in a room licensed by the bishop. A handsome place of worship belonging to the New Connexion of Methodists has been erected at a cost of nearly £2000; and in union with it is a school-house, sufficiently capacious for 600 children, and serving both for week-day and Sunday schools.

Hurst

HURST, a township, in the parish of Woodhorn, union of Morpeth, E. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 5½ miles (E. by N.) from Morpeth; containing 42 inhabitants. Among the early owners of this place were the families of Balliol, Denton, Hunter, Lumley, and Ogle. A castle, or peelhouse, is still remaining; but it is nothing more than a strong old farmhouse, with a small tower, elevated very slightly above the roof of the building, and apparently for the defence of the door. The township comprises 360 acres.

Hurst, Courtney

HURST, COURTNEY, a township, in the parish of Birkin, union of Selby, Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. W.) from Snaith; containing 134 inhabitants. The township, which is bounded on the south by the river Aire, comprises about 580 acres; the soil is generally light and sandy. The village is small, but pleasantly situated, and the surrounding scenery is agreeably varied. A rent-charge of £139 has been awarded as a commutation for the tithes.

Hurst-Monceaux.—See Herstmonceaux.

HURST-MONCEAUX.—See Herstmonceaux.

Hurst, Old (St. Peter)

HURST, OLD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of St. Ives, hundred of Hurstingstone, county of Huntingdon, 4¼ miles (N. by W.) from St. Ives; containing 182 inhabitants. The living is united, with that of Woodhurst, to the vicarage of St. Ives: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1801.

Hurst-Pierrepoint (St. Lawrence)

HURST-PIERREPOINT (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Cuckfield, hundred of Buttinghill, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 9 miles (N.) from Brighton; containing 2118 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4989a. 30p., of which 2453 acres are arable, 1711 pasture, 21 in orchards, and 281 woodland. The village stands on an acclivity, and consists of one long street, containing many very good and handsome houses; it is situated between the two great Brighton roads, and the road from Crouch-hill to Lewes by way of Ditchelling passes through it. A market for corn is held on Tuesday, and a fair on the 1st of May. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 9. 4½., and in the patronage of N. Borrer, Esq.: the rectorial tithes have been commuted for £1000, and the impropriate for £25; there are 5 acres of glebe. The late church, erected in the reign of Edward III., having been removed, a new edifice was completed in May, 1845; it is a spacious and beautiful building, 122 feet long, and cost upwards of £7000. The Independents and Wesleyans have each a place of worship. A national school is supported by endowment amounting to £36 per annum, and by subscription; and there are several charitable institutions. The union workhouse is situated at Hurst-Pierrepoint. Dr. Swale, rector of the parish, and who was buried here, was tutor to Prince Henry, eldest son of James I.

Hurst, Temple

HURST, TEMPLE, a township, in the parish of Birkin, union of Selby, Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (N. W.) from Snaith; containing 114 inhabitants. This place derived the prefix to its name from a preceptory of the Knights Templars, founded about 1152, in which year the manor was given to them by Henry de Lacy. The township comprises about 700 acres: the village is situated on the river Aire, and the surrounding scenery is of pleasing character. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1789. There are still some remains of the preceptory, with its fish-ponds and moat; and some small remains of a chapel, distant about a mile from the Temple.

Hurstbourn-Priors (St. Andrew)

HURSTBOURN-PRIORS (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Whitchurch, hundred of Evingar, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Whitchurch; containing 506 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Bourne St. Mary annexed, valued in the king's books at £12. 19. 4½.; net income, £202; patron, the Bishop of Winchester; impropriators, the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of St. Cross.

Hurstbourn-Tarrant (St. Peter)

HURSTBOURN-TARRANT (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Andover, hundred of Pastrow, Kingsclere and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5½ miles (N. by E.) from Andover; containing, with the tything of Brickleton, 850 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4466 acres; the surface is hilly, the soil on some of the hills clay and chalk, and in the valleys gravelly. A stream called the Swift flows through the lower grounds, for certain portions of the year. The village is pleasantly situated on the road from Newbury to Andover. The living is a vicarage, with that of Vernham-Dean annexed, valued in the king's books at £8. 12. 6.; patron, the Prebendary of Hurstbourn and Burbage in the Cathedral of Salisbury. The great tithes have been commuted for £1340, and the vicarial for £402. 11. 6.; the glebe comprises 50 acres.

Hurstley

HURSTLEY, a township, in the parish of Letton, union of Weobley, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford, 5 miles (W. S. W.) from the town of Weobley; containing 105 inhabitants.

Hurworth (All Saints)

HURWORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Darlington, S. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham; consisting of the townships of Hurworth and Neasham, and containing 1599 inhabitants, of whom 1235 are in the township of Hurworth, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Darlington. The parish is bounded on the south by the river Tees, which separates it from Yorkshire; and comprises 3930a. 3r. 18p., whereof two-thirds are arable, and the remainder meadow, pasture, and woodland. Its soil, from the river side, for three-quarters of a mile, is a fine gravelly loam, but in other places a cold clay: the river flows over a bed of red sandstone, which, in some parts of the channel, when dry, is quarried. The weaving of linencloth is carried on to some extent. The village is inhabited by a number of genteel families, and consists principally of a spacious well-built street, beautifully placed on the brow of a hill at the foot of which flows the Tees, and commanding a fine view of the windings of that river through the vale of the Tees, and of the Cleveland bills, distant fifteen miles, which form a soft outline to the scenery. The York and Newcastle railway runs through the parish for one mile and a half, crossing the Tees by a magnificent stone viaduct of four oblique arches; the Croft station is three-quarters of a mile from Hurworth. The Croft or Hurworth branch of the Stockton and Darlington railway also runs for about one mile through the parish, nearly parallel, at a hundred yards' distance, with the York and Newcastle line, and terminates at Hurworth Place, a village recently populated, where is a depôt for coal and lead. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £27. 5. 5., and in the gift of the Rev. Robert Hopper Williamson, who is also incumbent; the tithes have been commuted for £550, and the glebe comprises 68 acres. The church, a cruciform structure with a square tower, was enlarged in 1832, at an expense of £1965, raised by subscription and the sale of pews, aided by a grant of £400 from the Incorporated Society; of 850 sittings, 406 are free. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans; and some schools aided by an endowment of £22 per annum. Skeletons are frequently dug up in the western end of the village. William Emmerson, the self-taught mathematician, who died in 1782, was born and resided here.

Husborn-Crawley (St. Mary Magdalene)

HUSBORN-CRAWLEY (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Woburn, hundred of Manshead, county of Bedford, 2½ miles (N. by E.) from Woburn; containing 656 inhabitants. It comprises 1500 acres; the soil is generally clayey, the surface for the most part hilly, and the low land a marshy moor. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £46; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Bedford. The tithes were commuted for land in 1795. The church occupies an elevated situation, and has a tower eighty feet high.

Husthwaite

HUSTHWAITE, a parish, in the union of Easingwould, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York; containing 577 inhabitants, of whom 406 are in the township of Husthwaite, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Easingwould. The parish comprises the townships of Carlton and Husthwaite, in which latter are 1680 acres, the property of various owners; about one-half of the lands are arable. The village is pleasantly situated on an eminence, to the east of the road from Easingwould to Thirsk, and the York and Newcastle railway passes at a short distance in the same direction. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £91; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge, whose tithes have been commuted for £468, and who have a glebe of seven acres. The church is partly in the Norman style. At Carlton is a chapel of ease.

Huttoft (St. Margaret)

HUTTOFT (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (E.) from Alford; containing 515 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north-east by the sea, and comprises about 3300 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 11. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £100. The tithes were commuted for land and an annual money payment in 1779. The church is a handsome structure, much mutilated, and contains some ancient monuments. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hutton (All Saints)

HUTTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Billericay, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 2½ miles (W.) from Billericay; containing 449 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1701 acres, of which 1185 are arable, 362 meadow, and 100 woodland. The village, which is small, is pleasantly situated on the road from Brentwood to Billericay, and nearly at an equal distance from each. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London: the tithes have been commuted for £380, and the glebe comprises 22 acres. The church is a small ancient edifice with a tower of wood, and contains several inscriptions.

Hutton

HUTTON, a township, in the parish of Penwortham, union of Preston, hundred of Leyland, N. division of Lancashire, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Preston; containing 563 inhabitants. By an inspeximus, 7th and 8th of Richard II., reciting various charters of the abbey of St. Mary, Cockersand, it appears that Helias, the son of Roger de Hoton, had at a very distant period granted to that house three carucates of land in "Hottun," in "Leylondeschire," that is, of the whole town of Hottun, without any reservation. The abbey and great part of its possessions were sold by Henry VIII. to John Ketchyng. The township comprises 2073a. 2r. 13p., of which about one-third are arable, and two-thirds pasture, with some wood. The road from Preston to Ormskirk passes through. Hutton Hall, built in the 17th century, is the residence of the Rev. Robert Atherton Rawstorne, M.A. The free grammar school of Penwortham is situated here.

Hutton, or Priest-Hutton

HUTTON, or Priest-Hutton, a township, in the parish of Warton, union of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire, 2 miles (S. by E.) from Burton-in Kendal, on the road to Lancaster; containing 254 inhabitants. The manor is mentioned in the Domesday survey, and belonged to the Saxon Gilmichel. Adam de Hoton was one of the witnesses to Walter de Lyndesay's charter of liberties to Warton. The property was subsequently possessed by the Standish family, of whom Thomas Strickland Standish, Esq., sold it in 1817 to Lazarus Threlfall, Esq., of Lancaster. The township comprises 1049 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture and woodland; the surface is hilly, and the scenery beautiful, embracing views of Morecambe bay and the Lake mountains: freestone is obtained for private uses. The rivulet Whitbeck runs through the township, and is proverbial for its purity and lightness. The ancient mansion of Up Hall has been taken down, and a new erection on another site has received the name: near the old site a moat was visible within memory. Dr. Matthew Hutton, successively bishop of Lichfield and of Durham, and archbishop of York, was born here of humble parents in 1529, and was the founder of Warton grammar school. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hutton (St. Mary)

HUTTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, 7 miles (N. W. by W.) from Axbridge; containing 462 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1876 acres, of which 351 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14, and in the gift of G. Gibbs, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £315, and the glebe comprises 65 acres. The church has a fine groined ceiling, and the pulpit is of stone, richly ornamented with sculpture. Here are curious subterraneous caverns, communicating with the shafts of old mines, in which have been discovered considerable quantities of the bones of animals and birds.

Hutton

HUTTON, a township, in the parish of Long Marston, W. division of the Ainsty wapentake, W. riding of York, 4¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Tadcaster; containing 125 inhabitants. It comprises about 1250 acres, and is on the road from York to Wetherby. Here is the ancient and handsome mansion of Hutton Hall.

Hutton-Bonville

HUTTON-BONVILLE, a chapelry, in the parish of Birkby, union of Northallerton, wapentake of Allertonshire, N. riding of York, 4¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Northallerton; containing 111 inhabitants. The township comprises 1080 acres of land, and includes the small village of Lovesome-Hill. The York and Newcastle railway passes to the east of Hutton-Bonville Hall. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £53; the patronage and impropriation belong to Mrs. Mary A. Piers. The chapel is dedicated to St. Lawrence.