Hutton-Buscel - Huyton

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

594-598

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'Hutton-Buscel - Huyton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 594-598. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51057 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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Hutton-Buscel (St. Matthew)

HUTTON-BUSCEL (St. Matthew), a parish, in the union of Scarborough, Pickering lythe, N. riding of York; containing 811 inhabitants, of whom 506 are in the township, ½ a mile (N. by E.) from Wykeham, and 34 (N. E.) from York. This parish, which derives its name from having been anciently the "High town of the Buscel or Bushel family," is on the road from Scarborough to York, and comprises by computation, with West Ayton township, 3510 acres, of which about 1000 are moor and woodland, and the remainder arable and pasture. The surface is in some parts very elevated, and the scenery highly picturesque, and enriched by the windings of the Derwent, which flows through the parish on the east. Good limestone is quarried for building and agricultural purposes. The manor was purchased of G. Osbaldeston, Esq., by the Hon. Marmaduke Langley, in 1839. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 17. 6.; net income, £320; patron, Earl Fitzwilliam; impropriator, the Hon. M. Langley. The tithes were commuted for land and an annual money payment in 1790. The church is an ancient edifice, with a square tower; in the churchyard is a curious pillar. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hutton-Conyers

HUTTON-CONYERS, an extra-parochial liberty, in the wapentake of Allertonshire, though locally in that of Hallikeld, N. riding of York, 1¾ mile (N. N. E.) from Ripon; containing 190 inhabitants. This place was anciently the residence of a branch of the Conyers family, whose Hall appears to have been on the north side of the village, in a field still called the Hallgarth. It comprises 3059a. 2r. 3p.: the village is pleasantly situated upon a bold acclivity on the north bank of the Ure. The inhabitants attend the new church at Sharrow, on the West riding side of the river.

Hutton-Cranswick (St. Peter)

HUTTON-CRANSWICK (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Driffield, Bainton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; consisting of the townships of Hutton-Cranswick, Rotsea, and Sunderlandwick; and containing 1228 inhabitants, of whom 1154 are in the township of Hutton-Cranswick, 3½ miles (S.) from Driffield. This place is thought to have been more considerable than it is at present, and there are four or five mansions the moats around which still remain; the neighbourhood was the arena of fierce engagements between the Saxons and Danes, and traces of a fortified camp exist at Hutton. The parish comprises by computation 6230 acres, of which 4710 are in the township. It is bounded on the east by the navigable river Hull, on which are extensive flour-mills, and by which the produce is shipped to the Humber; the surface is boldly undulated, and the higher grounds command views over the Wolds and of Holderness. The villages of Hutton and Cranswick are within half a mile of each other, the former on an eminence, and the latter in a vale, and are neatly built and well inhabited. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 8. 6½.; net income, £130, with a house; patron, Lord Hotham. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1769. The church, supposed to have been built in the reign of Henry III., is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower, and contains an ancient Norman font ornamented with sculpture. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists.

Hutton-Hang

HUTTON-HANG, a township, in the parish of Fingall, union of Leyburn, wapentake of HangWest, N. riding of York, 3¼ miles (E. by N.) from Middleham; containing 43 inhabitants. This township, which comprises about 580 acres, is divided into High and Low, and gives name to the two wapentakes of Hang-East and Hang-West: the river Ure passes on the west and south.

Hutton-Henry

HUTTON-HENRY, a township, in the parish of Monk-Hesleton, union of Easington, S. division of Easington ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 1½ mile (S.) from Castle-Eden, and 12 (N. by W.) from Stockton-on-Tees; containing 287 inhabitants. It comprises about 1900 acres of arable and pasture, with about 100 acres of wood; the soil, in some parts a strong clay loam, is generally poor moory land, but capable of much improvement. The scenery embraces fine sea-views, and the air is very salubrious. Limestone is quarried; and at Hart Bushes, Messrs. Metcalfe, Wilson, Seame, and Co., opened a deep shaft for a coalmine in 1843: the produce is shipped at Hartlepool. The village stands on rising ground in the centre of the township, and the Stockton and Sunderland road passes on the east. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £232. 18. 1., of which £162. 18. are payable to the vicar of the parish, and £70 to the vicar of Hart. There is a place of worship for Roman Catholics, built in 1824, by the Rev. Thomas Augustin Slater.

Hutton-In-The-Forest (St. James)

HUTTON-IN-THE-FOREST (St. James), a parish, in the union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland; containing 264 inhabitants, of whom 165 are in the township, 5 miles (N. W.) from Penrith. The parish comprises 2300a. 12p.; 1880 acres are arable, 320 pasture and meadow, and 100 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 12. 8½.; net income, £123; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. A school was founded in 1715, by Thomas Fletcher, Esq., and others, and endowed with land producing about £20 per annum.

Hutton-I'-Th'-Hay.—See Scalthwaiterigg.

HUTTON-I'-TH'-HAY.—See Scalthwaiterrigg.

Hutton-John

HUTTON-JOHN, a township, in the parish of Greystock, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of the county of Cumberland, 6 miles (W. S. W.) from Penrith; containing 25 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £9.

Hutton-Le-Hole

HUTTON-LE-HOLE, a township, in the parish of Lastingham, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 9 miles (N. W. by W.) from Pickering; containing 272 inhabitants. It is situated on the east side of the river Dove, and comprises 2860 acres, whereof 1800 are common or waste. The tithes have been commuted for £43. 18. payable to the vicar, and £93. 17. to the Archbishop of York. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. John Stockton, in 1839, left £10 per annum for the instruction of children.

Hutton-Locras

HUTTON-LOCRAS, a township, in the parish and union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 1½ mile (S. W. by S.) from Guisborough; containing 57 inhabitants. This place was granted by the Conqueror to Robert, Earl of Morton, and was afterwards held by the family of de Brus, from whom it passed to the Thwengs, by marriage. The Hotons subsequently possessed property here; at the Dissolution the estate was in the hands of the priory of Guisborough, and came to the crown, since which date it has passed through several families. The township forms part of the district called Cleveland, and comprises 1510 acres: the hamlet is east of the road from Guisborough to Stokesley. Here was an hospital for lepers, dedicated to St. Leonard.

Hutton-Magnum

HUTTON-MAGNUM, a parish, partly in the union of Teesdale, and partly in that of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York; containing, with the township of West Layton, 297 inhabitants, of whom 209 are in the township of Hutton-Magnum, 3¼ miles (E. by S.) from Greta-Bridge. The township, including the hamlet of Lane-Head, comprises by computation 1500 acres, of which a portion may be classed among the best and richest lands in the county; it is chiefly the property of Sir Clifford Constable, Bart., who is lord of the manor. At Lane-Head is an extensive limestone-quarry. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Gilling, with a net income of £52: the church is a plain structure.

Hutton-Mulgrave

HUTTON-MULGRAVE, a township, in the parish of Lythe, union of Whitby, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 4¾ miles (W.) from Whitby; containing 63 inhabitants. This manor, called in Domesday book Hotune, was held under the Earl of Morton at the time when that survey was taken; the Mauleys subsequently owned the estate, and from them it descended, through the Bigods, to the present lord. The township comprises about 880 acres: the hamlet lies in the southern extremity of the parish, about three miles from the parochial church, and a short distance south of Mulgrave Castle.

Hutton, New

HUTTON, NEW, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 4 miles (E. S. E.) from Kendal; comprising the districts or places of Hay and Hutton-i'-th'-Hay, and the township of New Hutton; and containing 350 inhabitants, of whom 148 are in New Hutton township. The chapelry comprises 4489 acres, of which about 250 are woodland; the surface is hilly and mountainous, the soil various. The Kendal and Sedbergh road passes through; and the Oxenholme station of the Lancaster and Carlisle railway is distant only about two miles and a half. A large reservoir which supplies the Kendal and Lancaster canal, is situated partly in the chapelry. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80, including a grant from the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, patron, the Vicar of Kendal; impropriators, the Maste and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The tithes of the college have been commuted for £123. 17. 9.; there is neither glebe nor glebe-house. The chapel was erected in 1739, and handsomely rebuilt in 1829 at a cost of about £600, and contains 280 sittings, whereof 100 are free, the Incorporated Society having granted £100 in aid of the expense of erection; it has a beautiful marble font, and the chancel window is bordered with stained glass. A school is endowed with £5 per annum.

Hutton, Old

HUTTON, OLD, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 4 miles (S. E.) from Kendal; containing 488 inhabitants. This place and Holmescales form a joint township; but the latter, though united with Old Hutton in the poor's-rate and in the partition of common rights, is a hamlet forming the extreme point, east, of the parish of Burtonin-Kendal, and ecclesiastically belonging to it. The township is situated on the higher Kirkby-Lonsdale road, and on the river Bela, in ancient records Betha. The old inclosed lands comprise 1827a. 1r. 9p. The commons have lately been inclosed, and considerably improved, some of the owners having planted trees, and others tried drainage and plough cultivation to a rather large extent: these lands comprise 1293a. 1r. 36p. The surface of the township is undulated, being a succession of well-wooded, gently rising, and well-cultivated little hills; the views, also, are extensive and pleasing, extending to Morecambe bay on the west, and the Lake mountains on the north. The soil is generally a light sandy gritty loam, in provincial phrase, "sharp." At the village of Bridge-End, on the Bela, is a small worsted manufactory, long established; and at Holmescales is a bobbin-mill. Bleaze Hall, for several centuries the seat of the Batemans, was a large and elegant mansion, which still retains traces of its former consequence in a fine oak-wainscoted room, dated 1624; Hood-Ridding, another ancient mansion, has belonged for more than two centuries to the family of Yates.

The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £98; patron, the Vicar of Kendal; impropriators, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The tithes have been commuted for £104. 14. 8. A farm belonging to the benefice, situated at Esgrigg-End, contains 19 acres, customary measure; and another at Flodden Hill, in Holmescales, 18½ acres, same measure; and an allotment of 13 statute acres has been added as the share of common for both. A neat and commodious parsonage was built in 1841 by the incumbent, the Rev. Francis Whalley, aided by a grant of £200 from Queen Anne's Bounty. The chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, was erected in 1628, and rebuilt in 1699; it is a plain edifice, having square windows with mullions, and a small eastern window which is a pure specimen of the old English style: a burial-ground was consecrated in 1822. There is a place of worship for dissenters. A school, built and endowed in 1613 by Edward Milner, and rebuilt in 1753, has an income of £19. 11. per annum; and a parochial lending library, for the use of the minister and neighbouring clergy, was founded in 1757 by the Associates of the Rev. Dr. Bray: it consists of nearly 400 volumes. A small estate, producing £18 per annum, and supposed to have been given by Roger Ward, of the township, is appropriated to the poor; and there are some minor charities. On the Bela, about a quarter of a mile west from the chapel, is a cascade with a noble volume of water.

Hutton-Roof

HUTTON-ROOF, a township, in the parish of Greystock, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 3¾ miles (S. E.) from Hesket-Newmarket; containing, with the hamlet of Newbiggin, 197 inhabitants, Here is a good freestone-quarry.

Hutton-Roof

HUTTON-ROOF, a chapelry, in the parish of Kirkby-Lonsdale, union of Kendal, Lonsdale ward, county of Westmorland, 3¼ miles (W. by S.) from Kirkby-Lonsdale; containing 319 inhabitants. It comprises 2120 acres, of which 600 are in Hutton-Roof Cragg; and contains blue and white freestone, and several quarries of limestone. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Vicar of Kirkby-Lonsdale. The chapel, a small edifice, was built in 1757. A schoolroom was erected by subscription in 1773, and endowed by Thomas Chamney with £100.

Hutton-Rudby

HUTTON-RUDBY, a township, in the parish of Rudby-in-Cleveland, union of Stokesley, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 4½ miles (W. S. W.) from Stokesley; containing 911 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book written Hotun, was the property of Gospatrick, Earl of Northumberland, but on the rebellion of that noble was bestowed by the Conqueror upon the Earl of Morton: it afterwards passed to the Meinells, who, in the time of Edward I., held the estate under the Archbishop of Canterbury by military service; and among subsequent owners, mention occurs of the families of D'Arcy and Conyers. The manor was once of considerable importance, and attached to it was a soke or liberty extending over several adjacent places. The township comprises 2184a. 24p., of which 1213 acres are arable, 681 meadow, 29 wood, and 30 in roads, exclusive of 229 acres exempt by prescription from the payment of tithes. The village, which is large, is pleasantly situated on the southern acclivities of the dale of the Leven, and a bridge over the river affords means of communication with Rudby: many of the inhabitants are employed in various branches of the linen manufacture. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. A free school, founded in 1740, has an endowment.

Hutton, Sand

HUTTON, SAND, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Thirsk, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 3 miles (W.) from Thirsk; containing 309 inhabitants. This district, which takes the prefix to its name from the sandy nature of the soil, comprises 1315 acres, whereof 879 are arable, 374 meadow and pasture, 26 in plantations, and the remainder sites of buildings, water, and waste. The village is neatly built, and situated on the road from Northallerton to Boroughbridge, in a flat but richly-cultivated district in the vale of Mowbray, about a mile from the river Swale, which skirts the parish, and about two miles from the York and Newcastle railway. The chapel, dedicated to St. Mary, is a plain structure: the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £108; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. About a mile and a half from the village is a pillar, placed on a massive pedestal, and called Sand-Hutton Cross; it is supposed to be an ancient boundary stone.

Hutton, Sand

HUTTON, SAND, a chapelry, in the parish of Bossall, union of York, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 8 miles (N. E.) from York; containing 224 inhabitants. A neat and commodious chapel of ease has been erected, at the expense of J. Walker, Esq., proprietor of the lands, in consideration of the distance of the inhabitants from the parish church.

Hutton-Sessay

HUTTON-SESSAY, a township, in the parish of Sessay, union of Thirsk, wapentake of Allertonshire, N. riding of York, 5¾ miles (N. W.) from Easingwould; containing 114 inhabitants. It comprises 600 acres, and is situated to the north of a rivulet, a tributary of the Swale: the village stands on an eminence, surrounded by picturesque and well-wooded scenery.

Hutton, Sheriff (St. Helen)

HUTTON, SHERIFF (St. Helen), a parish, partly in the union of Malton, and partly in that of York, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York; containing, with the townships of Cornbrough, Lillings-Ambo, and Stittenham, 1316 inhabitants, of whom 955 are in the township of Sheriff-Hutton, 10 miles (N. N. E.) from York. This place is celebrated for its castle, erected in the time of Stephen (1140) by Bertram de Bulmer, from whose family it descended by marriage to the Nevilles, who held it till the battle of Barnet, in 1471, when Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, was slain, and his estates confiscated. Edward IV. bestowed it upon his brother, subsequently Richard III., and it became the prison of Edward Plantagenet, who was confined within its walls until the death of Richard on Bosworth-Field: the Princess Elizabeth of York, afterwards consort of Henry VII., was also confined here. The castle and manor remained in the hands of the crown till 1625, when they were granted to the Ingrams. The ruins of the castle are of quadrangular form, with a large open court in the centre, and the angles flanked with high square towers; a considerable part of the warder's tower, over the eastern gateway, still remains.

The parish comprises by measurement 8590 acres, of which 4800 are in the township, and which, with the exception of 120 acres of woodland and 260 waste, are equally divided between arable and pasture. The surface is undulated; the soil generally of moderate quality, but rich in the valley; and the scenery picturesque, embracing panoramic views including the Howardian hills, the cathedral of York, &c. A charter for a market and fair was granted in 1377, but neither had been held for a considerable time previous to 1839, when two fairs were established, one on Easter-Monday, and the other on Martinmas-day. The village, anciently Hotune, displays the singular appearance of hill and valley, a deep ravine running through the greater part of the main street, and the houses and cottages being built high up on each side. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £36, and in the patronage of the Archbishop of York (the appropriator), with a net income of £194: the tithes were commuted for land in 1769. The church, a very ancient edifice, was appropriated to the priory of Marton, and granted at the Dissolution to the see of York; it stands on an eminence, and consists of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a fine tower. The eastern window is large and of handsome branching tracery, and a few fragments of stained glass are preserved: in the north aisle is the recumbent figure of a Knight Templar; and a monument of alabaster represents a young female, also recumbent. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans; and a parochial school supported by subscription, aided by an endowment of £16 per annum.

Hutton-Soil

HUTTON-SOIL, a township, in the parish of Greystock, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 6 miles (W. by S.) from the town of Penrith; containing 359 inhabitants.

Huttons-Ambo (St. Margaret)

HUTTONS-AMBO (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Malton, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 3 miles (N. E.) from Whitwell; consisting of High and Low Hutton, and containing 408 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the river Derwent, and comprises by computation 2300 acres, chiefly arable, with an intermixture of wood and meadow; the surface is undulated, the soil of various quality, and the scenery picturesque. The village of Low Hutton, or Huttonupon-Derwent, is on the banks of the river, and High Hutton stands near the road from York to Malton. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £93; patron, the Archbishop of York; impropriators, Lord Macdonald, the Earl of Carlisle, and others. The tithes were commuted for land in 1805. The church is small. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Huxham

HUXHAM, a parish, in the union of St. Thomas, hundred of Wonford, Wonford and S. divisions of Devon, 3¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Exeter; containing 150 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the river Culm, comprises 765 acres; the soil is partly sandy, and partly clay, and there are some valuable mines of manganese. The living is a rectory, united to that of Poltimore, and valued in the king's books at £8. 6. 8.: the tithes have been commuted for £118, and the glebe comprises 22 acres.

Huxley

HUXLEY, a township, in the parish of Waverton, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 3¾ miles (W. by S.) from Tarporley; containing 279 inhabitants. The township comprises about 1300 acres, of a clayey soil. The Chester canal passes on the south side. Huxley Hall is a curious specimen of early architecture; the original ceilings in some of the apartments are still preserved, exhibiting richly embossed groinings, and the ancient stone mullions yet remain in the spacious windows. It is now a farmhouse. A rent-charge of £135 has been awarded in lieu of tithes.

Huyton (St. Michael)

HUYTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Prescot, hundred of West Derby, S. division of Lancashire; containing, with the townships of Knowsley, Roby, and Tarbock, 3749 inhabitants, of whom 1263 are in the township of Huyton, 7 miles (E.) from Liverpool. In the time of Edward the Confessor, the district was in the possession of two thanes. The Lathoms were early proprietors, being mentioned in the reign of Henry III. Isabella, the heiress of Sir Thomas Lathom, brought a large portion of the property to Sir John Stanley, and the heiress of another branch of the family conveyed by marriage their estate here to the Harringtons: the heiress of the Harringtons married into the family of Molineau, of New Hall. The parish comprises by measurement 10,063 acres, whereof 1755 are in Huyton township. The land is principally arable; about 2025 acres are woodland and park-grounds: the surface is elevated and undulating, the soil various, the air salubrious, and the scenery beautiful. The stream anciently designated the Terbeck skirts the southern verge of the parish; rising near Childwall, and passing by Little Woolton and Tarbock, it descends into the Mersey at Hale-Bank, in Halewood. A branch, also, of the Alt, a small affluent of the Irish Sea, flows from the vicinity of Huyton to the north-west, by Croxteth Park. Coal, but of inferior quality, is raised; and to the east of the village of Huyton, is an excellent slatequarry. A brewery, belonging to Mr. Barker, was established in 1825. The Liverpool and Manchester railway has stations at Huyton-Lane, Huyton-Quarry, and Roby-Lane. In 1846 acts were passed for the construction of a railway from Huyton to Runcorn and Aston, Cheshire, a line of 12 miles; another to Warrington, also 12 miles; one to Prescot and St. Helen's, 5½ miles; and one to Edge-Hill, 4½ miles.

The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 9.; net income, £300, with a house; patron, the Earl of Derby. The original church was of considerable antiquity, having been granted to the priory of Burscough, at the time of its foundation, by the first Robert de Lathom. The oldest portion of the present noble church is supposed to be a relic preserved at the rebuilding in 1647. The structure is partly in the early English style, and consists of a tower, nave, aisles, and chancel; the body is divided from the aisles by low strong circular columns with fluted mouldings bearing semicircular arches: the east window and several others are adorned with stained glass. The edifice was repaired in 1663; the present tower was built in the last century, the interior enlarged in 1823, and the chancel lengthened and improved in 1847. At Knowsley is a separate incumbency. A place of worship for Independents was built in 1836. There is a school with an endowment of £10 per annum, and other schools are supported by subscription.