Kaber - Kelfield

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

640-643

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'Kaber - Kelfield', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 640-643. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51068 Date accessed: 23 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Kaber

KABER, a township, partly in the parish of Brough, but chiefly in that of Kirkby-Stephen, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 2 miles (S.) from Brough; containing 214 inhabitants. In 1663, an insurrection of the republican party being contemplated, preparatory meetings were held at Kaber Rigg by the disaffected, several of whom were eventually executed at Appleby. A school was founded and endowed by Thomas Waller and others, in the year 1689; the annual income is £10. 8.

Katerham, county Surrey.—See Caterham.

KATERHAM, county Surrey.—See Caterham.

Kea (St. Kea)

KEA (St. Kea), a parish, in the union of Truro, W. division of the hundred of Powder and of the county of Cornwall, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from the town of Truro; containing 4261 inhabitants. The parish is situated to the west of the Mopas roadstead of Falmouth harbour, and is intersected on the south-west by the Redruth railway. Copper and tin mines are worked within its limits, and there is a smelting-house for silver. The living is a vicarage, united to that of Kenwyn: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £495, and the vicarial for £265. 9.; there are 22¾ acres of glebe. The present church, built about the year 1803, stands at a short distance from the road between Truro and Falmouth; the tower of the former edifice is still remaining. There are places of worship for the Society of Friends and Wesleyans. Mr. John Lanyon in 1724 gave to certain trustees, to found an almshouse, the sum of £1000, with which they purchased an estate now producing about £50 per annum; the number of inmates is nine.

Keadby

KEADBY, a township, in the parish of Althorp, union of Thorne, W. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 12 miles (W. N. W.) from Glandford-Brigg; containing 401 inhabitants. An almshouse for seven persons was erected by a bequest of William Dixon.

Keal, East (St. Helen)

KEAL, EAST (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, E. division of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2¾ miles (S. W.) from Spilsby; containing 382 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 1830a. 2r. 39p., is on the road from London to Louth; and facilities of conveyance are afforded by the Forty-foot Drain, which is navigable. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 11. 3.; net income, £495; patron and incumbent, the Rev. John Spence. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1773; the glebe-house was built by the present incumbent. The church is a neat structure. Some springs in the parish are slightly chalybeate.

Keal, West (St. Helen)

KEAL, WEST (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, W. division of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (S. W. by W.) from Spilsby; containing 576 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2266 acres by computation; the surface is diversified with hill and dale. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 1. 8.; net income, £463; patron, Robert Cracroft, Esq. The church is a neat structure, occupying a lofty eminence. The springs here are impregnated with iron.

Kearby, with Netherby

KEARBY, with Netherby, a township, in the parish of Kirkby-Overblow, Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 4½ miles (W. by S.) from Wetherby; containing 226 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 1348 acres, belonging to various proprietors, of whom the chief is the Earl of Harewood, who is lord of the manor. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Kearsley, or Kersley

KEARSLEY, or Kersley, a township, in the parish of Farnworth, union of Bolton, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 4 miles (S. E.) from Bolton; containing 3436 inhabitants. This place was until lately a township of the parish of Deane, but is now united to Farnworth, which see. It contains 990 acres, and is partly situated in a valley through which the Irwell flows; the Manchester and Bolton road, and Manchester and Bolton railway, also cross the township. Kearsley Hall, a plain gabled stone mansion, and the birthplace of the benevolent William Hulme, is a curious ancient building, fitted up originally with beautiful specimens of oak carving. Kersley-Mount House is the residence of William Stott, Esq., a large coal proprietor; it commands fine views. In the township are a papermill, three cotton-mills, very extensive chemical works, a stone-quarry, and fifteen coal-pits, all in operation, and in which the population is mainly employed. High-Style school was built by Henry Mather about 1752, and endowed with land now producing £250 a year, for the education of orphans and other poor children of the townships of Bolton, Kearsley, and Tonge with Haulgh; in this school 190 boys and girls are instructed: there is a house and garden for the master. The Swedenborgians have a meeting-house and a school. Kearsley Moss is much resorted to for turbary: oak and alder trees are found deeply imbedded in the peat; the timber is generally as black as ebony, but in a less perfect state of preservation than that which is usually obtained in these enormous beds of decayed vegetation.

Kearsley

KEARSLEY, a township, in the parish of Stamfordham, union of Castle ward, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 10¾ miles (N. E.) from Hexham; containing 11 inhabitants. It is in a retired part of the parish, at its north-western extremity, between Ryall and Ingoe, and comprises 505a. 2r. 18p. of land. The tithes have been commuted for £13. 13.

Keckwick

KECKWICK, a township, in the parish and union of Runcorn, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 6 miles (N. E. by N.) from Frodsham; containing 75 inhabitants. The manor anciently belonged to the family of Dutton, of Dutton, from whom it passed to the Astons, in the reign of Henry VIII. It was purchased by Sir Richard Brook, Bart., in 1843, for £35,000. The township comprises 516 acres, of a sandy and a clayey soil; and is intersected by the Liverpool and Birmingham railway and the Duke of Bridgewater's canal. A tithe rent-charge of £67 is paid to the Dean and Chapter of Oxford.

Keddington (St. Margaret)

KEDDINGTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Louth, Wold division of the hundred of Louth-Eske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Louth; containing 157 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1000 acres, and the canal from Louth to the sea passes through it. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 8.; net income, £77; patron, Sir W. E. Welby, Bart. The tithes were commuted for land in 1766; the glebe comprises 60 acres. The church is a neat edifice, and is also attended by the inhabitants of the extra-parochial district of Louth Park, which, though ecclesiastically within the parish, is for all civil purposes independent of it. There are some slight remains of a religious house; and a stream of water issuing from the spot is still called Monk's Dyke.

Kedington, or Ketton (St. Peter and St. Paul)

KEDINGTON, or Ketton (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Risbridge, partly in the hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, but chiefly in that of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (N. E. by E.) from Haverhill; containing 710 inhabitants, of whom 628 are in Suffolk. This place was for many generations the residence of the Barnardiston family, whose ancient seat, Kedington Hall, has been taken down. The parish comprises 2342a. 1r. 12p.; the surface is gently undulated, and in some parts hilly: the village is pleasantly situated in a valley through which flows the river Stour. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 8. 6½.; net income, £498; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Barrington Syer. The church contains several monuments of the Barnardistons. Archbishop Tillotson was for some time rector.

Kedleston (All Saints)

KEDLESTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Belper, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (N. W.) from Derby; containing 102 inhabitants. It comprises 977a. 2r., nearly the whole of which are within the limits of Kedleston Park, the splendid seat of Lord Scarsdale. The mansion, a structure of elegant design, contains a suite of superb apartments, embellished with every classical variety of art, a collection of paintings by the first masters, and a series of casts of the ancient school. Its grounds are adorned with plantations of oak and other full-grown trees, and with a fine sheet of water, over which a bridge of three arches forms an approach to the Hall. The scenery in the park is enriched with some picturesque cascades; and over a sulphureous spring, the water of which is efficacious in cutaneous and scorbutic diseases, is a building having a bath and other requisites for the use of the water. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 19. 7.; net income, £155; patron, Lord Scarsdale. The church has a Norman south door, and contains several ancient monuments of the Curzon family.

Keelby (St. Bartholomew)

KEELBY (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Caistor, E. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7 miles (N. E. by N.) from Caistor; containing 719 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the Roman Bartonstreet, comprises by computation 1700 acres. A pleasure-fair is held on the 10th of July. The living is a discharged vicarage; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Yarborough: the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £18, and the glebe consists of 62 acres. The church, an ancient structure, of which the south aisle has been taken down, was substantially repaired a few years since. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. The rent of 10 acres of land was given by Alice Louth, to the poor, and for the repair of the church. At the hamlet of Cotham was a Cistercian nunnery, founded in the reign of Stephen by Alan Muncels or Munceaux, and containing at the Dissolution a prioress and twelve nuns, whose revenue was £46.

Keele (St. Michael)

KEELE (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Newcastle-under-Lyme, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 2½ miles (W. by S.) from Newcastle; containing 1194 inhabitants. The parish is intersected by the road from Newcastle to Betley and Nantwich, and comprises by admeasurement 2500 acres, mostly arable and pasture land, but chiefly the latter. The surface is undulated, and the soil of a stiff nature, generally lying close upon clay, and producing excellent crops of corn; in many places the grounds are well planted. At Silverdale are collieries and ironstone mines, and smelting-furnaces worked by a blast of heated air; which afford employment to upwards of 600 persons. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £171, with 23 acres of glebe, and a house at a nominal rent; patron and impropriator, Ralph Sneyd, Esq. The church, a neat embattled stone edifice with a tower, on an elevated site at the east end of the village, was built in 1790, principally at the expense of Colonel Sneyd; it contains about 350 sittings. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school is supported by subscription, aided by a bequest of Mrs. Sneyd's of £5 per annum.

Keenly

KEENLY, a grieveship, in the parish of Allendale, union of Hexham, S. division of Tindale ward and of Northumberland; with 275 inhabitants.

Keevil (St. Leonard)

KEEVIL (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Westbury and Whorwelsdown, partly in the hundred of Melksham, but chiefly in that of Whorwelsdown, Whorwelsdown and N. divisions of Wilts, 4 miles (E.) from Trowbridge; containing, with the tything of Bulkington, 773 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2700 acres by computation; the soil is chiefly a stiff clay, the surface generally flat, and the lands are watered by a copious brook which flows into the river Avon. The ancient manor-house is a fine specimen of the Elizabethan style. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 7. 1.; net income, £250; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Winchester; impropriator, the Rev. T. H. Tragett. Here is a school with a small endowment.

Kegworth (St. Andrew)

KEGWORTH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 11 miles (S. E. by E.) from Derby; containing, with the chapelry of Isley-Walton, 1945 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the east by the river Soar, comprises by measurement 2160 acres, whereof two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture. Many of the females are engaged in framework knitting, and the figuring of lace, at their own dwellings. There are two ale breweries. Fairs are held on Feb. 18th, Easter-Monday, April 30th, and October 10th; but they have dwindled into mere holiday fairs. The village is on the road from London to Manchester; and a station of the Midland railway is situated about a mile from it. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 15. 7½.; net income, £860; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Christ's College, Cambridge. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1778; the glebe comprises 60 acres of grassland. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with an embattled tower surmounted by a spire. At Isley-Walton is a chapel of ease. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, and Wesleyans. A free school was founded in 1575, by Queen Elizabeth; and a national school for girls and an infants' school are supported by the rector. The sum of £27. 10., the amount of various benefactions, is yearly distributed among the poor.

Keighley (St. Andrew)

KEIGHLEY (St. Andrew), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, in the E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 44 miles (W. by S.) from York, and 210 (N. N. W.) from London; containing 13,413 inhabitants. This place, anciently Kyghelay, was for many generations the property of the Kyghelay family, who either gave their name to, or derived it from, the manor; and of whom Gilbertus Kyghelay, of Utley, was buried here in 1203, according to an inscription on a stone still remaining in the parish church. In the reign of Edward I. Henry de Kyghelay, a member of the family, obtained the grant of a weekly market and an annual fair, with privilege of free warren for the inhabitants. Towards the close of the sixteenth century, the manor was conveyed, by marriage with the heiress of the last lord, to William Cavendish, created Baron Cavendish, of Hardwick, in 1604, and who was ancestor of the dukes of Devonshire and earls of Burlington. In the reign of Charles I., the town was garrisoned for the parliament, and (in 1645) was attacked by a party of royalists from Skipton Castle, who made many of the republicans prisoners; they were rescued, however, by General Lambert, who, advancing to their relief, compelled the royalists to retire.

The town is situated in a beautiful valley, near the rivulets Worth and North Beck, which, uniting their streams, flow into the river Aire, about a mile below the bridge here, which is a neat structure. The houses are built chiefly of stone. The streets are paved, and lighted with gas from works erected under an act of parliament, obtained in 1824, for the improvement of the town; and the inhabitants are amply supplied with water from copious springs in the vicinity, conveyed by works established under an act in 1816. A mechanics' institution was founded in 1825, and in 1835 an appropriate building was erected for its use, at an expense of £1050, of which £200 were raised by subscription, and the remainder by a proprietary; the building contains a reading-room, a spacious lecture-room, and a library of 1000 volumes. The worsted manufacture is carried on extensively; and there are two establishments for cotton-spinning, one of them erected about 1780, by Sir Richard Arkwright: a great part of the machinery used in the factories is made in the town; there are two paper-mills, and several large corn-mills. The worsted-stuffs are chiefly sent to the Bradford market. The Leeds and Liverpool canal passes within a mile, and, in connexion with other lines, opens a direct communication through Yorkshire and Lancashire with the eastern and western sea-ports. The Leeds and Bradford Extension railway, which connects the West riding with the town of Colne, in Lancashire, was opened as far as Keighley, in March, 1847. The market, which is abundantly supplied with provisions of all kinds, is on Wednesday, and there is a market for cattle every alternate Tuesday; fairs for cattle and merchandise are held on the 8th and 9th of May, and the 7th, 8th, and 9th of November. A very commodious market-place was erected in 1833, on land owned by the lord of the manor, by a proprietary of £25 shareholders. Petty-sessions are held on the last Wednesday in every month, in the court-house, a neat building erected at an expense of £700, in 1831. The powers of the county debt-court of Keighley, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Keighley. The town is a polling place for the West riding of the county.

The parish comprises about 10,160 acres, of which 2000 are peat moor; the soil in the valleys is rich, and in profitable cultivation. The surface is diversified with hills, and the low grounds are watered by numerous rapid streams, descending from the moors, and winding their course into the river Aire; the rugged summits of the hills, the acclivities of which are covered with blue heath, contrast finely with the luxuriant verdure of the vales, and the view of the town, as seen from the several heights, is strikingly romantic. The substratum is partly of the coal formation, alternated with sandstone; and near the town are found large blocks of granite, deeply imbedded in the soil. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 0. 7½., and in the gift of the Duke of Devonshire: the tithes have been commuted for £220, and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church, an ancient structure modernised in 1710, was rebuilt in 1807, and again very recently. A church, dedicated to St. John, was erected in 1841, at Paper-Mill Bridge, about a mile from the town, on the Halifax road, at an expense of £2500, towards which a society granted £400, and the Earl of Burlington gave the site and £100; it is a neat structure in the Norman style, with a tower, after a design by Mr. Rawstorne, of Bradford, and contains 750 sittings. The living is in the gift of the Bishop of Ripon. Two Church districts, named respectively Eastwood and Oakworth, were formed in 1844, and endowed by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners. The church for the latter district, called Christ church, was consecrated in November, 1846, and is in the style prevailing in the 12th century; the sittings are all free. Each of the two livings is in the alternate gift of the Crown and the Bishop. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, Primitive Methodists, Swedenborgians, and Wesleyans, and a Roman Catholic chapel. The free grammar school was founded, and endowed with a house and garden for the master, and with other houses and lands now producing £162 per annum, by John Drake. Adjoining is a preparatory school, the master of which has a salary of £40, arising from a house and land bequeathed by Jonas Tonson, in 1716. Isaac Bowcock, of Tong, in 1669, bequeathed property now yielding £320 yearly, for apprenticing children, and for distribution among the poor. The union of Keighley contains a population of 36,175, and comprises 6 parishes or places.

Keinton - Mandeville (St. Mary Magdalene)

KEINTON - MANDEVILLE (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Langport, hundred of Catsash, E. division of Somerset, 4¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Somerton; containing 586 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from London to Taunton, comprising 647 acres. Blue lias of excellent quality for paving or building is found here. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 9.; net income, £151; patron, the Rev. Edward Allen. The tithes were commuted for corn-rents in 1804; the glebe comprises 90 acres. The church consists of a nave and chancel, with an arched passage on the north side of the former, which leads to an octagonal tower at the west end; the building was enlarged and repewed in 1841, when 140 sittings were added. There is a place of worship for Bryanites. The Roman Fosse-way passes on the south-east of the parish.

Keisby

KEISBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Lavington, poor-law union of Grantham, wapentake of Beltisloe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (N. E.) from Corby; containing 73 inhabitants.

Keisley

KEISLEY, a township, in the parish of Dufton, East ward and poor-law union, county of Westmorland; containing 25 inhabitants.

Kelbrook

KELBROOK, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Thornton, union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. by E.) from Colne. This place is situated on the road from Skipton to Colne, and skirted on the south-west by the Leeds and Liverpool canal. Its surface is beautifully undulated, and the scenery is mountainous, the high grounds commanding extensive views of Pendle Hill, &c. The population is partly engaged in hand-loom weaving, and in a cotton-mill. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of Miss Currer, of Eshton Hall, by whom the church was chiefly erected, in 1838, at a cost of nearly £1000; it is a neat edifice, dedicated to St. Mary, containing 260 sittings. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Kelby

KELBY, a chapelry, in the parish of Haydor, union of Sleaford, wapentake of Aswardhurn, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 5½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Sleaford; containing 107 inhabitants. The chapel, dedicated to St. Andrew, comprises portions in the Norman style, with decorated and later English insertions; the font is very ancient.

Kelfield, Lincoln.—See Butterwick, West.

KELFIELD, Lincoln.—See Butterwick, West.

Kelfield

KELFIELD, a township, in the parish of Stillingfleet, union of Selby, wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, E. riding of York, 6¼ miles (N. by W.) from Selby; containing 315 inhabitants. The township comprises 1729 acres, partly the property of Lord Wenlock: the old manor-house is still encompassed by a moat. The village is seated on the banks of the Ouse, about a mile and a half to the south of Stillingfleet; and there is a ferry across the Ouse to Cawood. Rentcharges amounting to £463 have been awarded as commutations for the tithes; £143 are payable to the vicar, and £320 to the Dean and Chapter of York. The Wesleyans have a place of worship; and there is a free school, founded by Mrs. Mary Stillingfleet.



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