Killerby - Kilverstone

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

672-674

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'Killerby - Kilverstone', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 672-674. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51075 Date accessed: 19 September 2014.


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Killerby

KILLERBY, a township, in the parish of Heighington (though entirely surrounded by the parishes of Gainford and Staindrop), union of Darlington, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 7 miles (N. W. by W.) from Darlington; containing 105 inhabitants. It stands in a low situation, near the source of a small rivulet, and comprises about 390 acres of land: the village is a little to the north of the road from Darlington to Staindrop. Divine service is performed in a room on Sundays, by permission of the bishop. The tithes have been commuted for £20 to the vicar, and £114 to the Dean and Chapter of Durham.

Killerby

KILLERBY, a township, in the parish of Catterick, union of Bedale, wapentake of Hang-East, N. riding of York, 2 miles (S. E. by E.) from the town of Catterick; containing 62 inhabitants. It is situated between the Leeming-Lane and the river Swale, and comprises by computation 890 acres. Killerby Hall is a neat mansion with pleasant grounds.

Killinghall

KILLINGHALL, a township, in the parish of Ripley, Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 1 mile (S. by E.) from Ripley; containing 559 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 3350 acres. The village is situated on the south side of the river Nidd; it is neatly built, and the surrounding scenery is agreeably diversified. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Killingholme (St. Denis)

KILLINGHOLME (St. Denis), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, E. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 12 miles (N. W. by W.) from Great Grimsby; containing 681 inhabitants, of whom 181 are in North, and 500 in South, Killingholme. The parish is bounded by the river Humber, and comprises by measurement 5130 acres, of which 2630 are in North Killingholme. Within the last few years, two lighthouses have been erected on the bank of the river, in the township of South Killingholme, by the Brethren of the Trinity House at Hull; prior to which, the chief landmark for mariners was the tower of the church. The old manor-house is still inhabited by descendants of the ancient lords of the manor, who were raised to the peerage by the titles of Earls of Warrington and Barons de la Mere, now possessed by the Earls of Stamford. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Habrough united in 1740, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 4.; net income, £285;patron and impropriator, the Earl of Yarborough. The tithes were commuted for land in 1776;the glebe comprises 130 acres. The church is an ancient structure, with a handsome embattled tower, which is crowned by pinnacles. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Killington

KILLINGTON, a chapelry, in the parish of KirkbyLonsdale, union of Kendale, Lonsdale ward, county of Westmorland, 4 miles (S. W.) from Sedbergh; containing 301 inhabitants. The chapelry is situated on the river Lune, and on the road from Kendal to Sedbergh. It comprises 4785a. 2r. 7p., of which 3511 acres are pasture, 650 meadow, 460 arable, and 156 woodland; the soil is loam, sand, a moss, and the scenery of rugged character. The chapel, a very ancient structure, was repaired and new-pewed in 1824. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Vicar of Kirkby-Lonsdale. Some tithes were commuted for land under an act of inclosure, in 1811; and under the recent Tithe act, rent-charges have been awarded, of which £1. 2. are payable to the vicar, and £27 to Trinity College, Cambridge. There is a glebe of 20 acres. A school is endowed with £6. 14. 6. per annum.

Killingworth

KILLINGWORTH, a township, in the parish of Long Benton, union of Tynemouth, E. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 5½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Newcastle-upon-Tyne; comprising 1656a. 2½p., and containing 1787 inhabitants. It is situated on a commanding eminence, in the midst of a fertile and pleasing tract of country. An extensive colliery belonging to Lord Ravensworth and partners is in full operation, employing about 600 men and boys: the coal-field is much dislocated, and varies considerably as to thickness. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £280, payable to Balliol College, Oxford, and the vicarial for £19. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists, Methodists of the New Connexion, and Wesleyans; also a school in which divine service is performed on Sunday afternoon.

Killpeck (St. David)

KILLPECK (St. David), a parish, in the union of Dore, Upper division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford, 8¼ miles (S. W.) from Hereford; containing 238 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Worm, and comprises 1976 acres, of which 1136 are arable, 700 meadow, and 140 wood. It abounds with romantic and richly-varied scenery. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £4. 11. 8.; net income, £50; patrons, the Clive family; appropriator, the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol. The church is a very ancient structure, in the Norman style, of which it displays some interesting details in its various periods, from its massive simplicity to its more enriched and elegant transitions into the early English style. To the west of the church are some slight remains of a castle, and on the south are vestiges of a priory, situated in a pleasant vale.

Kilmersdon (St. Peter and St. Paul)

KILMERSDON (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Frome, hundred of Kilmersdon, E. division of Somerset, 7 miles (N. W. by W.) from Frome; containing, with the hamlets of Charlton, Coleford, Luckington, and Lypiate, 2143 inhabitants, of whom 563 are in the village of Kilmersdon. This parish, which has for many generations been the property of the Jolliffe family, comprises by computation 3400 acres. Coal is found, and a mine is now in full operation; there are also quarries of stone, which is used for building, but chiefly for mending roads. The village, which is spacious and well built, was in compliment to the late T. S. Jolliffe, Esq., the presiding magistrate of the hundred, made one of the judicial divisions of the county; and petty-sessions are held here at stated intervals. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 18. 6½., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriator, J. T. Jolliffe, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £376, and the vicarial for £243. 17. The church is in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower, crowned by pinnacles, and of light and graceful proportions. A district church and parsonage-house were completed at Coleford in 1831. There are two places of worship for Wesleyans.

Kilmeston

KILMESTON, a parish, in the union of Alresford, hundred of Fawley, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4½ miles (S.) from Airesford; containing 256 inhabitants. The living is annexed, with that of Titchbourne, to the rectory of Cheriton: the tithes have been commuted for £350.

Kilmington (St. Giles)

KILMINGTON (St. Giles), a parish, in the union and hundred of Axminster, Honiton and S. divisions of Devon, 1¼ mile (W. by S.) from Axminster; containing 495 inhabitants. It is bounded on the east by the river Axe, and comprises 1763 acres. An act for the inclosure of land was passed in 1842. A fair for cattle is held on the first Wednesday in September. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Axminster: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £100, and the vicarial for £240.

Kilmington (St. Mary)

KILMINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, forming a detached portion of the hundred of Norton-Ferris, in the union of Mere, E. division of Somerset, 4 miles (N. W.) from Mere; containing, with the tything of Norton-Ferris, 635 inhabitants, and comprising 2642a. 3r. 15p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 9. 4½., and in the gift of the Earl of Ilchester: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe comprises 55 acres. In the church lie the remains of Mr. Hartgill and his son, both murdered in the reign of Queen Mary, by Lord Stourton and others, who were convicted and executed. A gallery has been built, and 100 free sittings provided, the Incorporated Society having granted £40 in aid of the expense. About two miles to the south-west is a small oval intrenchment called Jack's Castle, supposed to have been the site of a Danish camp or fortress; and at the south-western extremity of the parish, near Stourhead, is a triangular brick tower, erected in 1772, by Henry Hoare, Esq., with an inscription commemorative of Alfred the Great and his victories over the Danes.

Kilndown.—See Goudhurst.

KILNDOWN.—See Goudhurst.

Kilner, county of Somerset.—See Culbone.

KILNER, county of Somerset.—See Culbone.

Kilnsay, county of York.—See Coniston.

KILNSAY, county of York.—See Coniston.

Kilnsea (St. Helen)

KILNSEA (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Patrington, S. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 8½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Patrington; containing 140 inhabitants. This parish, sometimes called Kilnsea with Spurn, comprehends the narrow neck of land at the south-eastern extremity of the county, terminating in the promontory of Spurn Head. It comprises about 1000 acres, inclosed a few years since, and, with the exception of the promontory, some warren, and marshes, consists of arable land; the soil is strong, and of productive quality, the surface level, the scenery wild, and destitute of wood. The immediate vicinity of the village of Kilnsea has been subject for a considerable time to the encroachments of the sea, and so great have these been of late years, that the part of the village which now remains is situated near the edge of the cliff, and some of the buildings within a few yards of it. On August 1st, 1826, the church, which stood upon the cliff, fell into the water, a fragment of the tower only being left; this for some years afterwards appeared in the form of a picturesque ruin, but it has also been swept away. Divine service has since been performed in a large room. Spurn Head, the Ocellum Promontorium of Ptolemy, had once a wellfrequented port called Ravenspurn and Ravensburgh, which, with its populous market-town of the same name, was washed away early in the fifteenth century; it enjoyed a considerable trade, and sent members to parliament in the reigns of Edward I., II., and III. On the point are two lighthouses, and a few cottages for the life-boat men stationed here by the Hull Trinity House, for the purpose of assisting distressed sailors. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 8. 6½.; net income, £82; patron, G. L. Thompson, Esq., who is also impropriator.

Kilnwick (All Saints)

KILNWICK (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Beverley, Bainton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; comprising the townships of Beswick, Bracken, Kilnwick, and part of Lockington; and containing 627 inhabitants, of whom 251 are in the township of Kilnwick, 7 miles (N. N. W.) from Beverley. The parish is situated at the foot of the Wolds, and the township consists of 1692a. 1r. 17p. There are quarries of chalkstone, which, when burnt into lime, makes excellent mortar, and, when mixed with the clayey land in a pulverised state, adds greatly to its fertility. The road from Beverley to Driffield passes through the parish; and a good parish highway leads from the village to the navigable river Hull, about four miles distant. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £101; patron and impropriator, Colonel Grimston: the vicarial tithes were commuted at the inclosure of the parish, in 1786, for 63 acres of land. The church is an ancient structure; on the south side is a fine Norman entrance arch.

Kilnwick-Percy (St. Helen)

KILNWICK-PERCY (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 1 mile (E. N. E.) from Pocklington; containing 58 inhabitants. This parish, which is an escarpment of the Wolds, comprises by computation 1561 acres, whereof 788 are arable, 572 meadow and pasture, 180 woodland, and about 20 water. The surface is undulated; the soil very rich, producing excellent corn; and the scenery picturesque, and interspersed with fine plantations. The Driffield and Burlington road passes through. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 16. 3.; patron, the Dean of York. The great tithes have been commuted for £160, and the vicarial for £119; the glebe comprises 22 acres.

Kilpin

KILPIN, a township, in the parish and union of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, E. riding of York, 2 miles (S. E. by E.) from the town of Howden; containing 393 inhabitants. It comprises about 1000 acres, and contains the villages of Kilpin and Kilpin-Pike, the latter situated on the Ouse, and having several wharfs and warehouses, with much traffic in corn and coal, and a large tanning establishment.

Kilreague

KILREAGUE, a township, in the parish of Llangarran, poor-law union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford; contaiuing 201 inhabitants.

Kilsby (St. Faith)

KILSBY (St. Faith), a parish, in the union of Rugby, hundred of Fawsley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 5½ miles (N. by W.) from Daventry, on the road to Lutterworth; containing 655 inhabitants. This parish comprises by measurement 2100 acres: the soil is generally a strong clay, and a considerable portion is rich grazing land; the surface is hilly. The Oxford canal passes through the parish; and the London and Birmingham railway is here conveyed through a tunnel 2398 yards in length, the cost of which, 600 yards being quicksand, amounted to £125 per yard. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7; net income, £147, with a glebe-house; patron, the Precentor in the Cathedral of Lincoln: the rectory, which is attached to the precentorship, is valued in the king's books at £14. The tithes were commuted for land in 1777. There is a place of worship for Independents. A bequest in land from Abraham Cowley, Esq., producing £18 a year, is given to the poor.

Kilton (St. Nicholas)

KILTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 14 miles (N. W. by W.) from Bridgwater; containing 161 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1400 acres of inclosed and profitable land, of which the greater portion is arable; and several hundred acres of waste on the Quantock hills. The surface is varied, and the scenery in some parts embellished with wood. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 6. 10., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £189; impropriator, Sir P. P. Acland, Bart.

Kilton

KILTON, a township, in the parochial chapelry of Brotton, union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 6¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Guisborough; containing 86 inhabitants. It is called in Domesday book Chiltune, and was granted by the Conqueror to the family of Brus, from whom the estate passed to the Lumleys, and from them to the Tullies, Waughs, and others. There was formerly a castle, which, with the lordship, belonged to the ancient family of Thweng. The township is in the district of Cleveland, and comprises about 1510 acres of land; it is situated on the Havenclose beck, which shortly after runs into the sea, and the scenery is on the whole of an interesting kind. A tithe rent-charge of £282 is paid to the Archbishop of York.

Kilve (St. Mary)

KILVE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Williton and Freemanners, W. division of Somerset, 11½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Bridgwater; containing 240 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Minehead to Bristol, and comprises by measurement 1605 acres, of which 617 are common or waste. Limestone is extensively quarried, chiefly for burning into lime. The living is a rectory, with the vicarage of Stringston united, valued in the king's books at £9. 16. 8., and in the gift of Balliol College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £211. 10., and the glebe comprises 57 acres. The church is a neat plain edifice. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Kilverstone

KILVERSTONE, a parish, in the union of Thetford, hundred of Shropham, W. division of Norfolk, 1¾ mile (E. N. E.) from Thetford; containing 47 inhabitants. This parish is on the road from London, viâ Thetford, to Norwich, and comprises by measurement 2019 acres, of which 536 are sheep-walks, 150 pasture, 100 in plantations, and the remainder arable. Kilverstone Hall, for many generations the seat of the family of White, is a handsome mansion, situated in a pleasant demesne, in which the church forms a romantic feature. On deepening the small river that flows through the parish into the Little Ouse, the foundations of a bridge, and several relics of Roman antiquity, were discovered. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 14. 9., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £140; the glebe comprises 26 acres. The church is a very ancient structure, in the Norman style, with a circular tower, and contains monuments to the family of White.