Kilvington - Kingmoor

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

674-677

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'Kilvington - Kingmoor', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 674-677. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51076&strquery=kimberworth Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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Kilvington (St. Mary)

KILVINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newark, S. division of the wapentake of Newark and of the county of Nottingham, 7 miles (S.) from Newark; containing, with the hamlet of Alverton, 56 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, consolidated with that of Staunton in 1826, and valued in the king's books at £6. 12. 1. The church, which was situated only a quarter of a mile from that of Staunton, has been taken down, and the church rates of the two parishes are assessed jointly.

Kilvington, North

KILVINGTON, NORTH, a township, in the parish of Thornton-le-Street, union of Thirsk, wapentake of Allertonshire, N. riding of York, 2½ miles (N.) from Thirsk; containing 63 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1210 acres, and is situated on the east side of the fertile vale of the small river Codbeck. Kilvington Hall, erected some few years since, is a neat brick mansion, with pleasant grounds. A tithe rentcharge of £132 is paid to the Dean and Canons of Oxford, and one of £29 to the Vicar. There is a chapel for Roman Catholics.

Kilvington, South (St. Wilfrid)

KILVINGTON, SOUTH (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the poor-law union of Thirsk, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York; comprising the townships of South Kilvington, Thornbrough, and Upsall; and containing 402 inhabitants, of whom 277 are in the township of South Kilvington, l¼ mile (N.) from Thirsk. The parish consists of about 2610 acres, of which 940 are in the township. The village, which is neatly built, is pleasantly situated on an acclivity on the east side of the Codbeck: the road from Thirsk to Stokesley passes through. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 10. 10.; net income, £511; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Sidney-Sussex College, Cambridge.

Kilworth, North (St. Andrew)

KILWORTH, NORTH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 5 miles (E. by S.) from Lutterworth; containing 422 inhabitants. The Grand Union canal passes through the north-eastern part of the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 0. 5.; net income, £567; patron, the Rev. T. Belgrave. The tithes were commuted for land in 1765, when, also, 33½ acres were allotted for the repair of the church and highways.

Kilworth, South (St. Nicholas)

KILWORTH, SOUTH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4½ miles (E. S. E.) from Lutterworth; containing 478 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 8. 11½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £500, with a glebe-house. The church is an ancient edifice with a beautiful spire; the north aisle was rebuilt in 1840, at a cost of £500, and the church was repewed at the same time. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a national school is supported by the rector. On the inclosure of the parish, 23½ acres were allotted for the repairs of the church.

Kimberley

KIMBERLEY, a hamlet, and formerly a chapelry, in the parish of Greasly, union of Basford, S. division of the wapentake of Broxtow, N. division of the county of Nottingham; containing 1778 inhabitants. It comprises about 800 acres of land, and has a considerable village, scattered upon elevated and broken ground at the southern extremity of the parish. Lawn mills, here, for grinding corn, were built in 1844; and there is an extensive brewery. The ancient chapel of ease, some time in ruins, has entirely disappeared. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans; and an infants' school, built in 1840.

Kimberly (St. Peter)

KIMBERLY (St. Peter), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Forehoe, E. division of Norfolk, 3½ miles (N. W.) from Wymondham; containing 148 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 1522 acres. Kimberly Hall, originally the seat of the Fastolff family, in the reign of Henry IV. became the property of Sir John Wodehouse, who took down the ancient structure, and erected a handsome mansion which, also, was demolished, in 1659. In 1720 the present noble building, which is situated eastward, and in the parish of Wymondham, was built by Sir John Wodehouse, since which period many improvements have been effected, including the erection of a fine terrace 300 feet in length: the seat is the property of Lord Wodehouse, representative of the very ancient family of Wodehouse, which derives its descent, through a succession of knights, from the reign of Edward I. Queen Elizabeth, in her progress through Norfolk, stopped at Kimberly, where a rich throne was erected for her, which, with several of her dresses, is preserved by the family as a memorial of her visit. The living is a discharged vicarage, united with the rectory of Bixton, to the living of Barnham-Broom, and valued in the king's books at £6. 12. 3.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1776. The church is a handsome and interesting edifice, occupying a picturesque situation near the road from Norwich to Hingham. The interior was newly fitted up at the expense of the late Lord Wodehouse; and a gallery, with an organ, was erected at the west end by Lady Wodehouse, in 1840: some ancient stained glass was the gift of the first lord Wodehouse. There are several memorials, among others a fine brass to Sir John and Lady Wodehouse, dated 1465. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Kimberworth

KIMBERWORTH, a township and ecclesiastical district, in the parish and union of Rotherham, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York, 2 miles (W.) from Rotherham; the district containing 2065 inhabitants. The township comprises about 2940 acres, of which the surface is varied; the substratum abounds with coal and iron-ore, and there are several quarries of building-stone. The village is situated on an eminence. At the Holmes are large iron and steel works, in which were cast the iron bridges of Southwark in London, Staines in the county of Middlesex, Yarm in the county of York, and Sunderland in the county of Durham. The church, dedicated to St. Thomas, was erected in 1842, at an expense of £1333, on a site given by John Saumarez Winter, Esq., of London; it is a neat structure in the early English style, with a campanile turret. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Rotherham; net income, £150. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans.

Kimble, Great (St. Nicholas)

KIMBLE, GREAT (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wycombe, hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 3¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Wendover; containing 489 inhabitants, of whom 68 are in the hamlet of Kimble-Wick. This place, according to old records, was anciently called Kunebel, from Cunobelin, or Cymbeline, the British king, whose sons here gallantly opposed the Romans, but were defeated, and one of them slain. There are still the remains of several intrenchments on the supposed field of battle; and on a circular mound in the neighbourhood are vestiges of a fortification termed Belinus' Castle, where it is said Cunobelin dwelt. The parish comprises 2472a. 3r. 2p.: the soil is various, partly clay and loam, alternated with chalk and gravel; the surface, in some parts flat, is in others diversified with hills, and the low lands are watered by a brook which issues from a copious spring. The living is a discharged vicarage, consolidated in 1799 with the rectory of Great Hampden, and valued in the king's books at £6. 10. 5.: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £171. 1., and the vicarial for £150; the glebe comprises 4½ acres.

Kimble, Little (All Saints)

KIMBLE, LITTLE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Wycombe, hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (W. by S.) from Wendover; containing 177 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 2. 11.; net income, £107: the patronage is in dispute.

Kimblesworth

KIMBLESWORTH, formerly a parish, in the union of Durham, W. division of Chester ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 3 miles (N. by W.) from Durham; containing 33 inhabitants, and comprising 690 acres of land. This was an ancient rectory and peculiar belonging to the convent of Durham. The foundations of the church, which was a small structure, may be traced in a field a little south of the village; and to the north of the place are some remains of the embankments which formed the ancient vivarium de Kymblesworth, mentioned in a charter of Bishop Pudsey's. The village, now reduced to a few cottages, is situated not far distant from the great north road. The living, which is valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 8., was united in 1593 to the perpetual curacy of Witton-Gilbert.

Kimbolton (St. James)

KIMBOLTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Leominster, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford, 3 miles (N. E. by E.) from Leominster; containing 715 inhabitants. It is on the road from Leominster to Tenbury, and comprises 1362 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Middleton-on-the-Hill annexed; net income, £132; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Hereford, whose tithes have been commuted for £346.

Kimbolton (St. Andrew)

KIMBOLTON (St. Andrew), a market-town and parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Leightonstone, county of Huntingdon, 10½ miles (W. by S.) from Huntingdon, and 63 (N. N. W.) from London; containing 1634 inhabitants. The town is pleasantly situated on the verge of the county, amidst sloping hills and woodlands diversified with fertile valleys. Kimbolton Castle, the magnificent residence of the Duke of Manchester, an ancient stone edifice in a spacious park, was the residence of Catherine of Arragon, first wife of Henry VIII., subsequently to her divorce; and it was here she died. A few females are employed in making lace, but the general occupation of the inhabitants is agriculture. The market is on Friday; and fairs are held on the Friday in Easter-week, for sheep and pedlery, and on December 11th, for cattle and hogs. A constable is appointed at the courts leet and baron held under the Duke of Manchester, who is lord of the manor. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5, and in the patronage of his Grace. The church is surmounted by a lofty spire. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents, Moravians, and Wesleyans. An ancient grammar school, of which the earliest notice occurs in 1600, is endowed with lands producing a rental of £131. In the parish are the remains of Stonely Priory, a convent of canons of the order of St. Augustine, founded by William Mandeville, Earl of Essex, about 1180, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary; the revenue, at the Dissolution, was valued at £62. 12. 3. Kimbolton gives the inferior title of Baron to the Duke of Manchester; it was the birth-place of Lord Kimbolton, afterwards Earl of Manchester, a parliamentary general in the civil war.

Kimcote (All Saints)

KIMCOTE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Lutterworth, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3½ miles (E. N. E.) from Lutterworth; containing, with the hamlet of Cotes-deVal, and part of Walton, 552 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20. 16. 3.; net income, £566; patron, Lord Willoughby de Broke. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1778. A school is endowed with £30 per annum; and the produce of two allotments under the inclosure act, and the amount of a few bequests, are distributed to the poor.

Kimmeridge

KIMMERIDGE, a parish, in the union of Wareham and Purbeck, hundred of Hasilor, Wareham division of Dorset, 4¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Corfe-Castle; containing 154 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south by Botteridge pool, or Kimmeridge bay, the entrance to which, between two high cliffs, is defended by a battery of two pieces of cannon. On the shore are copperas stones in abundance; and in the cliffs of this and the neighbouring parishes a sort of coal is found, of a bituminous nature, which burns with a strong light and emits a sulphureous smell; it is a hard substance, but, on exposure to the air, splits into pieces like slate. The living is a donative, in the patronage of the Mansel family.

Kimpton (St. Peter and St. Paul)

KIMPTON (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Hitchin, hundred of Hitchin and Pirton, county of Hertford, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Welwyn; containing 945 inhabitants. It comprises 3582a. 1r. 9p., of which 2968 acres are arable, 394 meadow, and 220 woodland. The females are mostly engaged in the platting of straw. A fair for hiring servants is held in September. The living is a vicarage, endowed with part of the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £12; the patronage, and the remainder of the rectorial tithes, belong to Lord Dacre. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £688. 8., and the vicarial for £449. 9.: the glebe comprises 22 acres. The church is situated on an acclivity rising from the north of the village; it has a square embattled tower surmounted by a short spire, and contains a fine screen of oak, with almost perfect remains of the ancient rood-loft.

Kimpton

KIMPTON, a parish, in the union and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (W. by N.) from Andover; containing, with the hamlets of Lower and Upper Shoddesden, 391 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 12. 1., and in the gift of the Rev. Charles Randolph: the tithes have been commuted for £530, and the glebe comprises 50 acres. The church has been repaired, and much improved by the erection of a tower. Mr. George Soles, of Kimpton Lodge, bequeathed £200, to be vested in the funds for the benefit of the poor. The late Dr. Goodenough, Bishop of Carlisle, was born in the parish.

Kinder

KINDER, a hamlet, in the chapelry of Hayfield, parish of Glossop, union of Hayfield, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (N.) from Chapel-en-le-Frith; containing 130 inhabitants. Kinder Scout, in the vicinity, is said to be the highest hill in the county.

Kinderton, with Hulme

KINDERTON, with Hulme, a township, in the parish of Middlewich, union and hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 1½ mile (E. S. E.) from Middlewich; containing 555 inhabitants. The powerful barons of Kinderton had possessions here at the time of the Conquest; and until about the end of the sixteenth century, they exercised the right of inflicting capital punishment for crimes committed within the barony. The township comprises 1356 acres of land, of a clayey soil, with some sand. The river Dane passes on the north. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £39.

Kineton, county of Warwick.—See Kington.

KINETON, county of Warwick.—See Kington.

Kinfare, or Kinver (St. Peter)

KINFARE, or Kinver (St. Peter), a parish, in the union, and S. division of the hundred, of Seisdon, S. division of the county of Stafford, 4 miles (W. S. W.) from Stourbridge; containing 2207 inhabitants. This place was anciently a borough and market-town of some importance, but the weekly market has long been discontinued, and the market-house pulled down. It was noted for the manufacture of woollen-cloth, and has now several forges for the manufacture of bar, rod, and sheet iron, and iron-wire. One of them, at a place called "The Hyde," is said to have been the first rolling and slitting mill in England; the works here are now carried on by Messrs. Lee and Bolton. A mill for the making of screws on a peculiar principle, is conducted under the immediate superintendence of the patentee, Mr. T. M. Woodyatt; and there is a large manufactory for spades and implements of husbandry. The parish comprises by admeasurement 8926 acres; the soil is fertile. There is an abundance of red sandstone, of which part of the church was built; but, from the facility of procuring bricks, it is not much used. The Oxford, Worcester, and Wolverhampton railway runs on the borders of the parish; the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal passes through its centre, and within its limits is joined by the Stourbridge Extension canal. Fairs for cattle, sheep, and horses are held on the last Tuesday in February, the second Tuesday in May, and the first Tuesday in December.

The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £151; patrons and impropriators, certain Trustees. The church is a very ancient structure, in the Norman style, with later additions; the east window is of elegant design, and enriched with flowing tracery. A schoolroom was erected at Halfcot in 1837, at the expense of J. H. H. Foley, Esq., in which divine service is performed by licence: Mr. Foley gives £35 per annum to the minister, and also supports the school, it being on his own estate. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship. There is a free grammar school, in support of which William Vynsent, in the 34th of Elizabeth, bequeathed land which, with subsequent gifts, produces about £200 a year; the school was rebuilt in 1819: it has one exhibition to Oxford or Cambridge. A national school is maintained by subscription. The Stewponey Agricultural Society, under the presidency of Mr. Foley, was established in 1841, on principles similar to those of the Royal Agricultural Society; it is supported by 200 gentlemen and farmers of the district, and attached to it is a club or benefit society. Within the parish is an ancient fortification, forming a parallelogram, deeply intrenched on two sides, and on the other two defended by a hill: in the neighbourhood is a tumulus; and here also was a large block of stone, called Battlestone, six feet high, and about twelve in girth, but it has been removed. Cardinal Pole was born at Stourton Castle, in the parish.

Kingcombe, Nether and Over

KINGCOMBE, Nether and Over, a tything, in the parish of Toller-Porcorum, union of Dorchester, hundred of Beaminster-Forum and Redhone, Bridport division of the county of Dorset, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Beaminster; containing 185 inhabitants.

Kingerby (St. Peter)

KINGERBY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Caistor, N. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (N. W.) from Market-Rasen; containing 106 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5; net income, £287; patron and impropriator, J. Young, Esq. Thomas Bell, in 1675, founded an almshouse containing 6 tenements, and endowed it with funds now producing £100 per annum.

Kingham (St. Andrew)

KINGHAM (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Chipping-Norton, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford, 4¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Chipping-Norton; containing 555 inhabitants. This parish is bounded on the west by the river Evenlode, which separates it from the county of Gloucester; and comprises by admeasurement 1841 acres, of which 1081 are arable, 445 meadow, and 245 common. The soil in some parts is a rich loam, in others clay alternated with gravel; the surface has a gentle slope towards the south, and the meadows and pastures are occasionally subject to inundation. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 11. 8.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. J. W. Lockwood, whose tithes have been commuted for £685. 15., and whose glebe comprises 100 acres. The church is an ancient structure, in the early English style, with a tower; the chancel was erected by an ancestor of the present incumbent, who also built the rectoryhouse, in 1685.

Kingmoor

KINGMOOR, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Carlisle, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland, 2 miles (N. W. by N.) from Carlisle; containing 412 inhabitants. It comprises 1100 acres, and belongs to the corporation of Carlisle, the freemen of which city hold their guild races here on Ascension-day.