Langar - Langho

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

20-23

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'Langar - Langho', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 20-23. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51091 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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Langar (St. Andrew)

LANGAR (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the wapentake, of Bingham, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 10½ miles (E. S. E.) from Nottingham; containing 309 inhabitants. This parish, including the chapelry of Barnstone, comprises 3825a. 3r. 5p.; the soil is fertile, and the surface highly picturesque. Langar Hall is a handsome residence, finely situated. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 7. 11.; net income, £208; patron, J. Wright, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land, on the inclosure of the parish; the glebe altogether comprises 345 acres. The church, which is near the Hall, is a large cruciform edifice with a richly-ornamented tower, and has several monuments of the lords Scroope, one of which, in memory of Lord Scroope who died in 1609, and his lady, is remarkably elegant. It also contains a monument to the memory of the distinguished officer, Admiral Earl Howe, who died August 5th, 1799, and was buried here. There is a chapel of ease at Barnstone.

Langbar, with Nesfield

LANGBAR, with Nesfield, a township, in the parish of Ilkley, Upper division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 8¼ miles (E.) from Skipton; containing 210 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1730 acres of land. The hamlet is situated on the northern acclivities of Wharfdale. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Langcliffe

LANGCLIFFE, a township, in the parish of Giggleswick, union of Settle, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe, W. riding of the county of York, 1 mile (N.) from Settle; containing 664 inhabitants. The township lies in a beautiful and fertile valley, bounded by Stackhouse and Langcliffe Scaurs, and comprises by computation 1890 acres, including part of Winskill hamlet. The lands are divided among several proprietors, and the population is chiefly employed in the cotton and paper manufactures; two large cottonmills are situated on the banks of the Ribble, in the neighbourhood, and a paper-mill likewise stands on that river. Langcliffe was parcel of the possessions of Sawley Abbey, and subsequently for a century and a half the property of the Dawsons, a family highly distinguished in point of alliances and personal desert. Whitaker gives a copy of verses, printed in 1690, by William Dawson, containing an account of a village destroyed by the Scots in the reign of Edward II., and supposed to be the parent of the present village; in confirmation of which, foundations of houses under Winskill have been met with, when draining some lands there In the village is a school-house, licensed by the Bishop of Ripon for divine service. Roman coins have occasionally been discovered.

Langdale, Great and Little

LANGDALE, GREAT and LITTLE, a chapelry, in the parish of Grasmere, union and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 5 miles (W.) from Ambleside; containing 442 inhabitants. This is one of the most romantic parts of the Lake district. Fine blue slate, much of which is sent to London, is obtained in the mountains on each side of the river Brathy; the loftiest of the mountain pikes, called Harrison Stickle, rises 2400 feet above the level of the sea. Within the chapelry is Elter-water, near which is a gunpowder-mill; and there are several smaller lakes, and the two beautiful waterfalls of Colwith Force and Skelwith Force. On a hill called Wreynose are three shire stones, marking the point at which the counties of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancaster meet. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Rector of Grasmere. The chapel is situated at Great Langdale, and another once stood at a place now called ChapelMire, in Little Langdale. The tithes have been commuted for £46. 10. Henry Bickersteth, Esq., was raised to the peerage, January 23rd, 1836, as Baron Langdale: his lordship is Master of the Rolls.

Langdale

LANGDALE, a township, in the parish of Orton, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 2½ miles (S. E.) from Orton; containing 123 inhabitants. The township is situated between Tebay and Raisbeck, and comprises 7702 acres, of which about 5000 are common or waste. It is a mountainous district extending southwards to the borders of Yorkshire; and belonged to the priory of Watton, in that county, to which it was granted by Henry II., and on the dissolution of which the manor was sold to the Wharton family. The rectorial tithes were purchased in 1618 by the landowners, and the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £60. Bishop Barlow, a learned divine of the seventeenth century, was born here.

Langdon

LANGDON, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Beaminster, Bridport division of the county of Dorset; containing 332 inhabitants.

Langdon, East (St. Augustine)

LANGDON, EAST (St. Augustine), a parish, in the union of Dovor, hundred of Cornilo, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 3¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Dovor; containing 316 inhabitants. It comprises 1065 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7; net income, £126; patron, the Earl of Guilford. A fair for toys and pedlery is held on Old May-day.

Langdon-Hills (St. Mary and All Saints)

LANGDON-HILLS (St. Mary and All Saints), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 13 miles (E. by S.) from Romford; containing 288 inhabitants. This is a fine tract of elevated ground, rising gradually from the north to its highest point, but in all other directions abrupt and steep. From the summit of the range, the loftiest in the neighbourhood, and from which the parish takes its name, are some extensive prospects; the hills and coast of Kent, as far as the Medway, being visible in clear weather. The parish comprises 1775a. 2r. 24p., of which 1120 acres are arable, 474 pasture, and 113 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 3. 9.; net income, £245; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London. The church is an ancient edifice, consisting of a nave and chancel, with a small chapel on the north side of the latter, and has been enlarged. The parish of West Lee, about a mile distant, was, after the destruction of its church, united with this parish.

Langdon, West (St. Mary)

LANGDON, WEST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Dovor, hundred of Bewsborough, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 3½ miles (N.) from Dovor; containing 119 inhabitants. It comprises 698 acres, of which about 50 are pasture, and the remainder arable. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with a portion of the rectorial tithes, which have been commuted for £32. 9. 6.; patron, the Archbishop of Canterbury; impropriator of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, the Owner of Langdon Abbey: the glebe comprises 4 acres. The church is in ruins. An abbey for White canons, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Thomas the Martyr, was founded here in 1192, by William de Auberville, and at the Dissolution had a revenue estimated at £56. 6.; it is stated to have been the first religious house dissolved by Henry VIII. There are some remains, forming a picturesque ruin.

Langenhoe (St. Andrew)

LANGENHOE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, hundred of Winstree, N. division of Essex, 5¼ miles (S. by E.) from Colchester; containing 161 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1874 acres, of which 161 are common or waste; and is bounded on the east by the navigable river Colne: the soil is generally a strong loam, producing average crops. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 4., and in the gift of the family of Waldegrave: the tithes have been commuted for £480, and the glebe comprises 30 acres. The church is an ancient edifice, with a tower of stone; the window of the chancel is decorated with numerous armorial bearings.

Langeview.—See Llangeview.

LANGEVIEW.—See Llangeview.

Langfield

LANGFIELD, a township, in the ecclesiastical district of Heptonstall, parish of Halifax, union of Todmorden, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 11½ miles (W. by S.) from Halifax; containing 3284 inhabitants. It is partly situated in the picturesque vale of Todmorden, and comprises by computation 2620 acres, a large portion of which is common or moorland belonging to the freeholders, who depasture it in lots proportioned to the extent of their freeholds. There are quarries of good building-stone. The township includes the hamlets of Stoodley and Mankinholes, and also contains within its limits some scattered dwellings, forming a kind of suburb to the town of Todmorden. Its surface is boldly undulated, and the surrounding scenery is strikingly diversified. On the moor are two capacious reservoirs, one of which covers fiftythree acres of ground, for the supply of the Rochdale canal and the various mills in the neighbourhood; and on a commanding eminence in the hamlet of Stoodley, called Stoodley Pike, is a lofty column erected in 1814, by subscription, to commemorate the restoration of peace throughout Europe. A fair for sheep is held at Lumbutts on the 11th of September. There are places of worship for dissenters.

Langford (St. Andrew)

LANGFORD (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Biggleswade, county of Bedford, 2¼ miles (S.) from Biggleswade; containing 840 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the patronage of the Crown; present net income, £240 per annum; impropriator, M. E. Welby, Esq.

Langford (St. Giles)

LANGFORD (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Maldon, hundred of Thurstable, N. division of Essex, 1½ mile (N. by W.) from Maldon; containing 257 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the south by the Chelmer and Blackwater navigation, is about six miles in circumference. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 4. 9½., and in the gift of the family of Wescomb: the tithes have been commuted for £270, and the glebe comprises 32 acres. The church is a small ancient edifice.

Langford (St. Andrew)

LANGFORD (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Swaffham, hundred of South Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 6½ miles (N. N. E.) from Brandon; containing 57 inhabitants. It comprises 1405a. 12p., of which about 892 acres are arable, 366 pasture, meadow, and heath, and 130 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Ickborough united, valued together in the king's books at £10. 2. 8½.; patrons, Lords Berners and Ashburton. The tithes of Langford have been commuted for £120, and the glebe contains 2½ acres. The church is chiefly in the early style, and consists of a nave and chancel separated by a decorated Norman archway; the chancel contains a splendid monument to the Garrard family.

Langford (St. Bartholomew)

LANGFORD (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the wapentake, of Newark, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 3¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Newark; containing 146 inhabitants. This parish is bounded on the west by the river Trent, and comprises by computation nearly 2900 acres. Its soil on the west side, which is principally meadow land, is strong; in the middle portion, a fine turnip soil, on gravel; and on the east, a cold wet gravel and a tenacious clay. The surface is generally flat; but the village, irregularly built upon an eminence overlooking the river, has a picturesque appearance. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £40; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The Fosse-road crosses the parish.

Langford (St. Mary)

LANGFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Farringdon, hundred of Bampton, county of Oxford, 3½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Lechlade; containing, with the tything of Little Farringdon, the township of Grafton, and hamlet of Radcutt, 707 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £21. 19. 4½.; net income, £349; patron, W. Vizard, Esq.; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under acts of inclosure, in 1808 and 1810. The church has been repaired, and 140 free sittings provided. There is a chapel of ease at Little Farringdon.

Langford

LANGFORD, a hamlet, partly in the parish of Burrington, hundred of Brent with Wrington, and partly in that of Churchill, hundred of Winterstoke, union of Axbridge, E. division of Somerset, 5½ miles (N. N. E.) from Axbridge. It is on the road from Bristol to Axbridge, and is divided into Upper and Lower Langford, in which latter is the village.

Langford-Budville (St. James)

LANGFORD-BUDVILLE (St. James), a parish, in the union of Wellington, hundred of Milverton, W. division of Somerset, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) from the town of Wellington; containing 608 inhabitants. It comprises 1750 acres, of which 176 are common or waste. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Milverton. The church contains a monument to William Bacon, ancestor of the celebrated sculptor.

Langford, Little (St. Nicholas)

LANGFORD, LITTLE (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wilton, hundred of Branch and Dole, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 5¼ miles (N. W.) from Wilton; containing 37 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Wiley, near the road to Bath, and comprises 900 acres, by measurement. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Earl of Pembroke: the tithes have been commuted for £145, and the glebe comprises 9 acres. The church is plain, with a south porch, over which is some ancient sculpture.

Langford, Steeple, or Great Langford (All Saints)

LANGFORD, STEEPLE, or Great Langford (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Wilton, hundred of Branch and Dole, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 5¾ miles (N. W.) from Wilton; containing 626 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Wiley, upon the road to Bath, and comprises 3941 acres, of which 469 are common or waste. A fair for sheep and horses is held on the 4th of October, upon the site of an old British camp named Yarnborough Castle. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £34. 0. 7½., and in the gift of Corpus Christi College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £720, and the glebe comprises 45½ acres.

Langhale (St. Stephen).—See Kirstead.

LANGHALE (St. Stephen).—See Kirstead.

Langham (St. Mary)

LANGHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Lexden and Winstree, Colchester division of the hundred of Lexden, N. division of Essex, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Colchester; containing 816 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the north by the navigable river Stour, and is supposed to have derived its name from the great length to which it extends, comprises 2971a. 1r. 38p. of good land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 11. 0½., and in the patronage of the Crown in right of the duchy of Lancaster: the tithes have been commuted for £629. 4., and the glebe comprises 63 acres. The church is a small ancient edifice, and consists of a nave, south aisle, and chancel, with a tower. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Langham (St. Peter and St. Paul)

LANGHAM (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union and soke of Oakham, county of Rutland, 2 miles (N. W.) from Oakham; containing 591 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2809 acres, of which 601 are arable, 1368 pasture, 16 woodland, 81 roads and waste, and the remainder meadow. Good stone is quarried for building and for the roads. The Oakham and Melton canal passes through the parish. The living, with that of Brooke, is annexed to the vicarage of Oakham. The church is a very handsome structure. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. A school is supported by a bequest from the Rev. H. Forster; and the poor have bequests amounting to £49. 16. per annum.

Langham (St. Mary)

LANGHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Stow, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 3¼ miles (E. by S.) from Ixworth; containing 293 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement nearly 1000 acres, and is chiefly the property of the family of Wilson, whose seat, Langham Hall, is pleasantly situated. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 16. 10½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £252, and the glebe comprises 52 acres. The church, situated within the grounds of the Hall, is in the decorated English style, consisting of a nave and chancel separated by a richlycarved screen. Ten acres of land are let in small allotments; and there is a farm of 11 acres, the rent of which is laid out in clothing for the poor.

Langham, Great, or Bishop's-Langham (St. Andrew)

LANGHAM, GREAT, or Bishop's-Langham (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Holt, W. division of Norfolk, 2½ miles (N. E.) from Blakeney; containing 383 inhabitants. This parish, which includes Little Langham, comprises 1692a. 17p., whereof 150 acres are pasture, 100 woodland, and the remainder arable. The soil is of a mixed quality, in some parts rather light, resting on marl; the surface is gently undulated, and the lower grounds are watered by a stream falling into the river Stiff key. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 10. 2.; net income, £146; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Norwich. The tithes were commuted for land in 1815. The church is chiefly in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains a Norman font.

Langham-Row

LANGHAM-ROW, a hamlet, in the parish of Mumby, poor-law union of Spilsby, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 71 inhabitants. The hamlet has a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists.

Langho.—See Billington-Langho.

LANGHO.—See Billington-Langho.