Langley-Wood - Langton, Church

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

25-28

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'Langley-Wood - Langton, Church', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 25-28. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51093 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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Langley-Wood

LANGLEY-WOOD, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Alderbury, hundred of Frustfield, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 15 inhabitants, and comprising 246 acres.

Langmere

LANGMERE, a hamlet, in the parish of Dickleburgh, union of Depwade, hundred of Diss, E. division of Norfolk; containing 109 inhabitants.

Lango.—See Billington-Langho.

LANGO.—See Billington-Langho.

Langport Eastover (All Saints)

LANGPORT EASTOVER (All Saints), an incorporated market-town and a parish, having separate jurisdiction, and the head of a union, locally in the hundred of Pitney, W. division of Somerset, 4½ miles (W. S. W.) from Somerton, and 130 (W. S. W.) from London, on the great western road; containing 1172 inhabitants. This place, in the Domesday survey called Lanporth, is of great antiquity; and is supposed to have derived its name from the Saxon words long, extended, and port, a town, having reference to the length of its principal street. It was a royal burgh in the time of William the Conqueror, and contained 34 resident burgesses. In the civil war in the reign of Charles I., being considered a commanding station, it was well garrisoned, and alternately in the possession of the royal and the parliamentary forces: in July, 1644, the former were compelled to abandon the place, from the result of an engagement here, in which 300 men were killed, and 1400 made prisoners. The Town is situated on the river Parret (which is navigable for barges) near its junction with the Yeo and the Ile; at the western entrance a very ancient bridge of ten arches crosses the river, and there are nine other bridges, which are repaired from the funds of the corporation. At the eastern approach, on the old lines of fortification, an arch thrown over the road supports a building called the "Hanging Chapel," originally devoted to religious uses, but during Monmouth's rebellion the place of execution. The principal part of the town is on an eminence, and commands some pleasing and extensive views; that portion near the river, lying low, is subject to frequent inundations. Since 1800, the general appearance of the whole has been much improved by the erection of many new houses, and the inhabitants are supplied with excellent water from an adjacent well. A considerable traffic in coal, culm, iron, timber, salt, corn, &c., is carried on with London, Bristol, and various other places; and several boats, of from eight to fourteen tons' burthen, are constantly employed between the town and Bridgwater. The market is on Saturday; and fairs are held on the Monday before Lent, the second Wednesday in August, the last Monday but one in September, and the last Monday in November, for cattle.


Corporation Seal.

The borough sent members to parliament in the reign of Edward I., but the privilege was not subsequently exercised. The government is vested, by a renewed charter of James I. in the year 1617, in a corporation consisting of twelve chief burgesses, including a portreeve, justice, and two bailiffs, assisted by a recorder, townclerk, and serjeant-at-mace. The portreeve, justice, and recorder, are justices of the peace; the portreeve is coroner for the borough and clerk of the market, and his predecessor is justice. The powers of the county debt-court of Langport, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Langport, and part of the districts of Taunton and Yeovil. The town-hall, a neat edifice, was erected about 1733. The parish comprises 171a. 1p., chiefly pasture. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to that of Huish-Episcopi: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £15, and the vicarial for £70. The church is an ancient structure, in the early English style; in the eastern window, amongst other representations in stained glass, are figures of the Twelve Apostles: the edifice lately underwent new internal arrangement and decoration. There is a place of worship for Independents. The free grammar school, founded about the year 1675, by Thomas Gillett, has an income of £70 per annum; a national school was erected in 1827. An hospital for lepers, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene, stood here previously to 1310. The poor-law union of Langport comprises 29 parishes or places, and contains a population of 18,109.

Langport-Westover

LANGPORT-WESTOVER, a hamlet, in the parish of Curry-Rivell, union of Langport, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing 171 inhabitants.

Langport-Westover

LANGPORT-WESTOVER, a tything, in the parish of Huish-Episcopi, union of Langport, E. division of the hundred of Kingsbury, W. division of the county of Somerset; containing 66 inhabitants.

Langrick-Ferry

LANGRICK-FERRY, an extra-parochial place, in the union and soke of Horncastle, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (N. W.) from Boston; containing 22 inhabitants. This is a small hamlet, having its adjunct from a ferry across the river Witham. There is a place of worship for Methodists.

Langrick-Ville

LANGRICK-VILLE, a chapelry, in the union of Boston, soke of Horncastle, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (N. W.) from Boston; containing 218 inhabitants. Langrick-Ville was created a township, by act of parliament, in 1812, on the occasion of a very extensive drainage of about 14,000 acres of Wildmore and the eastern and western fens. The township consists of 1630 acres, on the north side of the Witham, and opposite the hamlet of Langrick-Ferry. A chapel was consecrated in 1818, of which the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £91; patrons, certain Trustees.

Langridge (St. Mary Magdalene)

LANGRIDGE (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Bath, hundred of Bath-Forum, E. division of Somerset, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Bath; containing 109 inhabitants. This place is distinguished as the scene of the sanguinary though indecisive battle which occurred on Lansdown Hill, at the extremity of the parish, between the royalist and parliamentarian armies, in 1643, and which is commemorated by a monument, erected on the spot, to Sir Bevill Grenville, who fell in that engagement. The parish comprises 647 acres, of which 32 are common or waste. The soil is rocky, and the surface diversified with hill and dale; the scenery is in parts enriched with wood, and the lower grounds are watered by a rivulet, which bounds the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 19. 4½., and in the gift of William Blathwayt, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £112; the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church is an ancient structure with a square tower, and consists of a nave and chancel, between which is a highly-enriched Norman arch; there is a Norman arch of plainer character in the south porch. In rebuilding the rectoryhouse a few years since, several coffins and skulls, and a silver-mounted battle-axe, were discovered.

Langrigg

LANGRIGG, with Mealrigg, a township, in the parish of Bromfield, union of Wigton, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 7 miles (W. S. W.) from Wigton; containing 262 inhabitants, of whom 204 are in Langrigg hamlet.

Langrish

LANGRISH, a tything, in the parish and hundred of East Meon, poor-law union of Petersfield, Petersfield and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 222 inhabitants.

Langsett

LANGSETT, a township, in the parish of Penistone, union of Wortley, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 5½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Penistone; containing 303 inhabitants. It is bounded on the west by the county of Chester, and comprises by computation nearly 4400 acres. An inclosure act was obtained in 1820; but the greater portion of the land is still uncultivated, affording only rough pasture. The principal sources of the river Don are within the limits of the township.

Langstone

LANGSTONE, with Tre-Evan, a township, in the parish of Llangarran, poor-law union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford; containing 104 inhabitants.

Langstone

LANGSTONE, a parish, in the union of Newport, division of Christchurch, hundred of Caldicot, county of Monmouth, 4½ miles (E. by N.) from Newport; containing, with the chapelry of Llanbeder, 220 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1200 acres, of which 350 are arable, 800 pasture, and 50 woodland. The soil in the southern and western portions is chiefly clay, resting upon limestone, and in the northern and eastern of a light sandy quality. Llanbeder comprises about 200 acres. The scenery is beautifully diversified, and the northern part of the parish, through which runs the road from Chepstow to Newport, commands a fine view of the Severn, and the counties of Devon and Somerset. Limestone is quarried for burning, and also for tomb-stones and paving. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 1. 0½.; net income, £158; patrons, the family of Gore: the glebe comprises 50 acres. The church is an ancient structure, partly in the early English style.

Langthorne

LANGTHORNE, a township, in the parish and union of Bedale, wapentake of Hallikeld, N. riding of York, 3¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from the town of Bedale; containing 115 inhabitants. The Duke of Leeds, who is proprietor of most of the district, has a large brick and tile manufactory here.

Langthorp

LANGTHORP, a township, in the parish of Kirkbyon-the-Moor, wapentake of Hallikeld, N. riding of York, ½ a mile (N. W.) from Boroughbridge; containing 304 inhabitants. It is separated from Boroughbridge by the river Ure; and contains a brewery, a large mill for flour, a mill for crushing bones, and an oil-mill. The Baptists have a place of worship.

Langthwaite

LANGTHWAITE, with Tilts, a township, in the parish and union of Doncaster, N. division of the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, W. riding of York; containing 25 inhabitants. This is a detached township, separated from the rest of the parish of Doncaster by Arksey. It adjoins Adwick-le-Street, and comprises about 800 acres, half in Langthwaite and half in Tilts: the former hamlet is in Domesday book called Langetovet.

Langtoft (St. Michael)

LANGTOFT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Bourne, wapentake of Ness, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 2 miles (N. N. W.) from MarketDeeping; containing 778 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1857 acres. The soil in the higher grounds is a brown, and in the lower a rich black, loam; the surface is generally flat, and the lands have been much improved by draining. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 5. 7½.; net income, £288; patron, Sir Gilbert Heathcote, Bart. The tithes were commuted for land in 1801: the glebe comprises 133 acres. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a spire at the west end of the north aisle; the nave is lighted by clerestory windows. Rachel Hyde, in 1707, bequeathed funds now accumulated to £450, for the purchase of a freehold estate for the poor.

Langtoft (St. Peter)

LANGTOFT (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Driffield, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York; containing, with the chapelry of Cottam, 688 inhabitants, of whom 647 are in Langtoft township, 6 miles (N. by W.) from Driffield. The parish is on the road from Driffield to Scarborough, and comprises, exclusively of Cottam, 3140 acres, the soil of which is commonly very good; the scenery is generally open, and on the Wolds very wild and bleak. The village is picturesquely situated in a valley. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £354; patron, the Archbishop of York; impropriator, the Rev. E. Gibbons. The tithes were commuted for land in 1801; there are 300 acres of glebe. The church is an old structure with a square tower. There is a chapel of ease at Cottam, in which divine service is performed monthly. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have places of worship. Peter of Langtoft, a celebrated monk and historian, was born here.

Langton

LANGTON, a township, in the parish of Gainford, union of Teesdale, S. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 8 miles (N. W. by W.) from Darlington; containing 99 inhabitants. This place, under the appellation of Langadun, was one of the vills surrendered by Bishop Aldhune to the earls of Northumberland; it long formed part of the estate of the Nevills, was included in their forfeiture, and is now the property of the Duke of Cleveland. Langton-Grange was for some years the residence of the Countess Dowager of Darlington. The township comprises 1061a. 2r.: a magnesian limestone-quarry is in full operation. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £61. 16., and the impropriate for £118. 2. 9., payable to Trinity College, Cambridge.

Langton (St. Margaret)

LANGTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, wapentake of South Gartree, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 1½ mile (W. by S.) from Horncastle; containing 177 inhabitants. This parish, the greater part of which is in the duchy of Lancaster, comprises 908 acres of land, with a subsoil of strong white clay, which is burnt as a substitute for lime. The river Witham passes by. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 19. 4½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Lincoln: the tithes were commuted for land in 1767; the glebe now comprises 172 acres, valued at £276, exclusive of five acres attached to the rectory-house, which has been nearly rebuilt by the present incumbent. The present church was commenced in March, 1845, was opened in November, 1846, and consecrated in September, 1847; it contains 200 sittings. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Two almshouses were founded, and endowed with 27 acres of land, by the Rev. Willoughby West, in 1691.

Langton (St. Peter)

LANGTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, hundred of Hill, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3¾ miles (N. by W.) from Spilsby; containing 194 inhabitants. This parish, which has been the residence of the Langton family for more than seven centuries, comprises by computation 1261 acres: a soft kind of limestone, called calc, is found. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 12. 3½., and in the gift of Mr. Langton: the tithes have been commuted for £340, and the glebe comprises 30 acres. The church is a handsome modern structure, of the Ionic order of Grecian architecture. There are three tumuli, and some slight vestiges of a Roman road.

Langton (St. Giles)

LANGTON (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Horncastle, E. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 1¼ mile (E. S. E.) from Wragby; containing 262 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.; patrons alternately, and joint impropriators, Earl Manvers, and C. Turnor, Esq. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £231, and the glebe comprises three acres.

Langton

LANGTON, with Bongate, a township, in the parish of Appleby St. Michael, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 1½ mile (E.) from the town of Appleby; containing 618 inhabitants. Langton, or Long Town, once a populous place, was almost destroyed by the Scots in the reign of Edward II. At Kirkbergh was anciently a church.

Langton (St. Andrew)

LANGTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Malton, wapentake of Buckrose, E. riding of York; containing 328 inhabitants, of whom 256 are in Langton township, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from Malton. The parish includes the township of Kennythorpe, and comprises by computation 3080 acres, of which about 600 are sheep-walks on the Wolds. The scenery is picturesque; and the soil of various kinds, clayey in the valleys, and on the hilly parts of a lighter nature. The village is neat and pleasant, situated on a bold acclivity rising from a small rivulet, and contains Langton Hall, a handsome mansion, the seat of Lieut.-Col. Norcliffe, who is lord of the manor, and chief proprietor of the soil. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 4. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £460. The church is a neat structure, built on the site of a more ancient edifice, in 1820, at a cost of £600, and contains 300 sittings. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Langton, Church (St. Peter)

LANGTON, CHURCH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Market-Harborough; containing 869 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 4000 acres, and includes the townships of East and West Langton, and the chapelries of Thorp-Langton and Tur-Langton. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £48. 13. 4.; present net income, £989; patrons, the Hanbury family. The church is an ancient and stately structure in the decorated English style, of remarkably light and elegant design. There are chapels at Thorp and Tur Langton, and a place of worship for Independents. A school, endowed with £60 per annum, has lately been opened; and there is also a school for the townships of East and West Langton, supported by a rent-charge on land bequeathed by three ladies. The Rev. William Hanbury, for many years incumbent of the parish, and remarkable for his benevolence, and his taste for the cultivation of trees, of which he had extensive plantations, in 1767 bequeathed the profits arising from his nurseries at different periods, to trustees, for the erection of a splendid church in the parish, and for the endowment of colleges, schools, hospitals, and literary and charitable institutions of every description; it being expressly ordered that the funds should be suffered to accumulate till they amounted to £10,000 or £12,000 per annum. In 1837, the funds had realized £6421. 10. 10., and the annual income was £574. Previously to the foundation of the school above noticed, the only branch of the bequest that had come into operation, was, a gift of beef to the parish, which has been continued since the year 1773, and is distributed annually among the poor of the several townships. The accumulation is still in progress.